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Old 12-08-2022, 04:11 AM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,562 posts, read 12,360,802 times
Reputation: 31353

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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post

Do you know if any brassicas produce anti-freeze proteins? I'm guessing it's more cellular rearrangement for most varieties since they go limp in the cold and don't have the ability to survive extreme cold... but some varieties do have the ability to survive rather cold temperatures.

I'm surprised that my passiflora caerulea still has green leaves with the -8C temperatures we got considering it's native to the subtropics of South America which have very mild winters. My understanding is the leaves can survive to -10C and roots to -15C?
I recall reading something about it being produced in brussels sprouts if the sprouts are left to overwinter in place on the stalk, but they freeze readily once cut off the stalk, and it's also produced in some hardy ornamental flowering cabbage and kale varieties. But I don't recall what were the very lowest freezing temperatures they could endure.

Re: passiflora caerulea, it's a semi-evergreen but I don't know if it produces anti-freeze proteins. I understand if it has very deep, long roots that go beyond 3 or 4 feet deep it's been known to survive in frozen ground temperatures down to -15C below the surface. The above surface vegetation may freeze and rupture and rot off but the root will produce new shoots after the ground thaws. Evergreen varieties of clematis plants will do the same thing if the roots go really deep even though above ground temperatures can destroy all of the above ground parts of the plants.

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Old 12-19-2022, 09:55 AM
 
2,020 posts, read 1,597,148 times
Reputation: 2094
We pulled up our turnip greens and we had enough turnips for one mess of turnip backbone stew. We also had enough greens to freeze two bags.
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Old 12-31-2022, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,383 posts, read 20,103,785 times
Reputation: 19944
We're getting a steady stream of seed catalogs.. My wife will be planning soon.
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Old 12-31-2022, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Covington County, Alabama
259,024 posts, read 87,066,280 times
Reputation: 138455
I just gifted my daughter with a stack of 2023 seed catalogs. I can get any seed I need now from our local farmer's co-op.
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Oakville, ON
3,919 posts, read 4,752,018 times
Reputation: 2254
Currently trying to pick varieties of fig cuttings from some other hobbyists. Next will be picking out some pepper seeds.
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Old 01-01-2023, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
80,549 posts, read 68,608,138 times
Reputation: 15535
Can't believe its January already! Feels like I just cleaned up the garden beds.


Pepper seed starting starts in 2 months.
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Old 01-01-2023, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Covington County, Alabama
259,024 posts, read 87,066,280 times
Reputation: 138455
At least this year fertilizer will not be an expense with upwards of 200 chickens pumping out 1-2-1 several times a day. That combined with pine shavings for more potassium and organic matter I think I'm all set with a little lime as needed.
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Old 01-01-2023, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,383 posts, read 20,103,785 times
Reputation: 19944
We're only planting in 1/2 of the garden this year. The other half will be cover. The corn patch will be a mix of buckwheat and some legume. Haven't decided on the other plot cover yet.

My wife's canned pepperoncini has been a huge hit. We have at least a half dozen people asking her to make some for them. They are awesome on top of a pulled pork BBQ sandwich or roast beef sandwich (or great snacking). I think we're going to drop jalapeno and banana peppers and grow a big patch of pepperoncini. No green beans this year- we have a lot canned. Same with tomatoes. Going to be a light garden this year.

Hopefully our new fruit plants start to produce. Haskaps will have been in the ground for the third year which should start to produce. We will plant more ground cherry and hopefully the raspberry bushes produce more this year.
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Old 01-05-2023, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
80,549 posts, read 68,608,138 times
Reputation: 15535
Tis the season!... Too soon?




I plan on doing a test, see which company is better. I always had success with Burpee.

And I like the attention grabber "Italy seeds". Wonder how much truth there is in that.

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Old 01-05-2023, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Capital Region, NY
1,988 posts, read 1,035,995 times
Reputation: 2697
I think I may try some black eyed peas (beans) this year. I’ll have basil, cilantro, chives, oregano; tomatoes, peppers, and the beans. Planning on moving my shed some time this year. If I can I will use the area to build another planter or two. The only issue is it has become even more expensive! I have farm stands down our street; not sure why I go through the trouble except for the fact that I actually enjoy having the garden!
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