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Old 03-04-2009, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
Sure you can lease land for crops. You need to execute a lease for the appropriate maturity of the trees you're growing, but yes it is done all the time.

In the Eastern Panhandle apple growers used to be a main cash crop, and the practice was quite common. the landowner may require you to submit an annual fertilizer and pesticide plan for their review, or ensure you are not contaminated their soils..

Check with the local Ag extension office, they can help you Alice.
Thank you, Threerun.
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Old 03-04-2009, 11:08 AM
 
8,647 posts, read 16,590,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
I have deer in the area and they would make short work of not only the fruit but the trees in very short order. And to an extent, yes, I intend to make and sell jams, jellies and wine on a relatively large scale - as well as selling the fruit at a local market. well, the wine is mostly for me and to give as gifts. But when I start canning or processing, I do it like I am preparing for an army. It's the only way to do things.
I'll take two jars of peach jam.....
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Old 03-04-2009, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Texas
8,062 posts, read 17,333,145 times
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Hmmm, if you bought or leased, you could claim agricultural use of the land and probably get tax benefits, maybe even subsidies.
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Old 03-04-2009, 06:54 PM
 
8,975 posts, read 15,904,448 times
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In Northern California there are a NUMBER of people doing this. Generally a fairly intimidating-looking group, (tatoos, pony tails, motorcycles), these guys often buy drip irrigation tubing by the quarter-mile, and do their growing on public land (Bureau of Land Management; US Forest Service, etc.) What do they grow, exactly? They're pretty evasive, and I've never been able to get close enough to their gardens to see.

But they're growing SOMETHING, and it's not on their land...
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Old 03-04-2009, 07:12 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
10,008 posts, read 15,711,274 times
Reputation: 40415
My parents are in their 80s and miss gardening. They have a friend with some land outside of town that fixed up a couple acres for a co-op garden. He gets the ground all ready and lets you know so you can go plant your part of it. My dad and another friend went in together, His part is mainly tomatoes. They got a good laugh out of it a few years ago. There are quite a few contract chicken houses in the area. My dad knows a man who has one. He asked him if he could get maybe a couple 5 gallon buckets of cured chicken manure to put around the tomato plants. His chicken friend drove a HUGE farm truck and dumped several TONS of chicken manure! Daddy said there was enough to bury the whole garden! lol They passed the word along to any other gardeners who needed manure to come and help themselves!
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Old 03-05-2009, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
My parents are in their 80s and miss gardening. They have a friend with some land outside of town that fixed up a couple acres for a co-op garden. He gets the ground all ready and lets you know so you can go plant your part of it. My dad and another friend went in together, His part is mainly tomatoes. They got a good laugh out of it a few years ago. There are quite a few contract chicken houses in the area. My dad knows a man who has one. He asked him if he could get maybe a couple 5 gallon buckets of cured chicken manure to put around the tomato plants. His chicken friend drove a HUGE farm truck and dumped several TONS of chicken manure! Daddy said there was enough to bury the whole garden! lol They passed the word along to any other gardeners who needed manure to come and help themselves!
That's the nice thing about poultry farmers - so willing to share
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Old 03-06-2009, 09:56 AM
 
5,760 posts, read 10,987,497 times
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Alice, I have done variations of Crop Share where I supplied none/some/or all of the equipment and others owned the land. That was usually Corn, Wheat and Soybeans -- which are considered Commodity Cash Crops.

I would caution against trees, as the life cycle and return tends to be across many years, and if the owner dies or the property is sold, or gets liens, these can all harm your businesses arrangement with limited recourse for you.

We are doing Veggie Crop Sharing this year with family that has a fallow farm site in East Texas.

As another caution once you wander outside of the industry, Internet Idiot folks get sort of nutty about Crop Share or Share Crop discussions -- thinking about 100 years out-of-date that the discussion is about some Post US Civil War thing.

Here is a thread on the topic on another site -- I am the starting poster, name of Phildo. As a caution, that site -- LATOC -- has a fair amount of nutcases.

Share Cropping

That discussion covers details of modern methods, sample leases, and links to various ag sites. If you would like to background yourself, use the search-term Crop Share on google, yahoo, or whatever, and you will find all the info you need.
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Old 03-06-2009, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip T View Post
Great info, thanks.
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Old 03-08-2009, 09:24 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
10,008 posts, read 15,711,274 times
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Somebody left me a rep and said chicken manure is a disease carrier and not approved for commercial sale. I knew this was wrong but wanted proof in writing.
True Organic Fertilizer: Manure and Muck (http://ezinearticles.com/?True-Organic-Fertilizer:-Manure-and-Muck&id=247229 - broken link)
Poultry Litter as a Fertilizer and Soil Amendment (http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/poultry/424-034/424-034.html - broken link)
I could probably show you 20 or so more sites that talk about how good chicken manure is. What my dad got a truckload of was some that was cured, or had been left alone for over a year to dry out. Won't burn the plants as bad. These contract chicken farmers sell that manure to be used in fertilizers. What else are they going to do with all that stuff?
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Old 03-08-2009, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
Reputation: 17322
Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
Somebody left me a rep and said chicken manure is a disease carrier and not approved for commercial sale.
That same bozo left me the same rep. People who leave such messages without signing their names or handles know they are wrong and the rest of us know they are just ignorant. I don't need to look it up. I know it's hogwash of an imbecile. Nice to get 5 rep points though.

I was a poultry farmer for years and the manure is an excellent plant food. I gave bags of it to city friends for their gardens and used it in my own gardens.

Bad information is not information.
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