U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-02-2009, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
Reputation: 17322

Advertisements

I am interested in planting a number of fruit trees every spring for the next several years. I can only plant so many on my own postage stamp piece of property and then will have to either lease land or get permission from other landowners to continue with my fruit growing endeavor. Does anyone have any personal experience growing fruit or vegetables on property you don't own?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-02-2009, 09:51 AM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
41,005 posts, read 53,248,569 times
Reputation: 54943
It's called tenant farming. Just kidding.
I would imagine if the property owners don't mind, and you later don't try to take the property through adverse possession, it would be ok. Just bear in mind that they could come in and cut down your very expensive in time and money trees at any time.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2009, 10:00 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,857 posts, read 33,625,750 times
Reputation: 22632
Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
I am interested in planting a number of fruit trees every spring for the next several years. I can only plant so many on my own postage stamp piece of property and then will have to either lease land or get permission from other landowners to continue with my fruit growing endeavor. Does anyone have any personal experience growing fruit or vegetables on property you don't own?
In order to protect yourself as much as possible I would certainly have any agreement drawn up by an attorney so as to cover all contingencies. You will also want to make certain that the land owner has liability insurance in the event you or a guest is injuried while on his property.

I agree with North Beach Person in that you will have very little rights in the event that the owner of the property decides to "change his mind" and gets rid of the trees. Property rights are pretty much sacrosanct. Have you considered buying an lot near your home? Also, if you have not already checked into it, I suggest you take a look at Starkbros.com where they sell very good dwarf varieties of fruit trees. By planting dwarfs you can get A LOT more trees in a small area.

20yrsinBranson
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2009, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
Reputation: 17322
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Also, if you have not already checked into it, I suggest you take a look at Starkbros.com where they sell very good dwarf varieties of fruit trees. By planting dwarfs you can get A LOT more trees in a small area.

20yrsinBranson
Dwarf trees are not a viable option.

I am leaning more toward leasing property for the purpose rather than on a next door neighbor's property kind of deal.

Last edited by AliceT; 03-02-2009 at 01:22 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2009, 01:53 PM
 
37 posts, read 102,347 times
Reputation: 31
Other options are plant your property border. My first guess would have been do dwarfs since if you need to move them - they can be dug up in early spring of late fall. Using containers with dwarfs would work too but they need more care.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2009, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
Reputation: 17322
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latania View Post
Other options are plant your property border.
Already did that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Latania View Post
My first guess would have been do dwarfs since if you need to move them - they can be dug up in early spring of late fall. Using containers with dwarfs would work too but they need more care.
Like I said previously, dwarfs are not a viable option.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2009, 01:28 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,857 posts, read 33,625,750 times
Reputation: 22632
Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
Already did that.

Like I said previously, dwarfs are not a viable option.
I'm really curious as to why this is. Are you growing them for commercial purposes?

20yrsinBranson
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2009, 01:37 PM
 
5,065 posts, read 15,220,835 times
Reputation: 3553
You can actually lease property to plant trees where you live? I have heard of leasing small plots for gardens, but never for trees. I would double-check with whoever you lease your plot from first, to make sure trees are allowed. It would be a terrible waste of time and money if you had to dig it all up. But if it's allowed and you can afford it, why not.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2009, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,254,122 times
Reputation: 17322
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I'm really curious as to why this is. Are you growing them for commercial purposes?

20yrsinBranson
I have deer in the area and they would make short work of not only the fruit but the trees in very short order. And to an extent, yes, I intend to make and sell jams, jellies and wine on a relatively large scale - as well as selling the fruit at a local market. well, the wine is mostly for me and to give as gifts. But when I start canning or processing, I do it like I am preparing for an army. It's the only way to do things.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2009, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
16,913 posts, read 19,659,001 times
Reputation: 19065
Sure you can lease land for crops. You need to execute a lease for the appropriate maturity of the trees you're growing, but yes it is done all the time.

In the Eastern Panhandle apple growers used to be a main cash crop, and the practice was quite common. the landowner may require you to submit an annual fertilizer and pesticide plan for their review, or ensure you are not contaminated their soils..

Check with the local Ag extension office, they can help you Alice.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top