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Old 05-14-2009, 09:15 PM
 
1,790 posts, read 6,491,777 times
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So I planted a dogwood a couple of months ago and lately it is not doing well. It first had droopy leaves and white stuff on the leaves so I bought some fungicide and sprayed it down. It seemed to do better and perked up. We have had a lot of rain and so a couple of days ago I noticed the droopy leaves again and some of the leaves turning white so I sprayed it again. Today although most of the leaves are green it is drooping and it makes for concern. Anyone have any suggestions?
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Old 05-14-2009, 09:37 PM
 
Location: rain city
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Wow, I don't know if your dogwood is needy or not--but quit spraying the poor thing.

It's just a baby, only been in the ground a month, still struggling to survive. You're stressing it needlessly by spraying it with who-knows-what, which it may or may not need.

Trees take time to become established. Sometimes they languish listlessly and perk up after after they're over the transplant shock, they might take a couple of years to become happy. They also can fail to root in and just deteriorate from the get go.

But whatever the deal is, spraying your baby tree is not likely a good idea. Leave it be for now.
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Old 05-15-2009, 11:25 PM
 
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Well, I learned something new today about my dogwood. I have one of those fake mulch rings around it and decided to remove it and inspect the soil under it. Even though it has been raining a lot the dirt under the ring was dry - very dry. I was amazed at how dry everything was. I watered the tree thoroughly and it seems to be doing well. Those rings are supposed to let water through but maybe it's just the slight incline at which the tree sits. I guess I will be watering this tree all summer to keep it alive or at least until it seems to be more established. Lesson learned!

Last edited by citydweller; 05-15-2009 at 11:25 PM.. Reason: edit
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Old 05-16-2009, 04:09 AM
 
Location: rain city
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Old 05-16-2009, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
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Newly planted trees do need regular watering while they are getting established. Established dogwoods will tolerate drought conditions, so don't water your tree too much. Interesting about those fake mulch rings - I've seen those in catalogs.
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Old 05-16-2009, 04:45 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,577,609 times
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Your dogwood should have come with directions. If not, here are some things the directions should have told you:

* Plant so that the root ball sits about 1 inch ABOVE the soil line. To plant the root ball under ground and them put more soil on top is just burying your tree. When you water it, you will drown it. Trees need air just as much as water and they breathe from the top of the root ball. (The mulch ring that you spoke of allows the tree to breathe - assuming that you didn't bury the whole root ball that came out of the pot)

* Thoroughly water the newly planted tree 2 or 3 times a day for the first week, then 1 or 2 times a day for the second week, then once per day for the next month to help it get established. After that, several times a week should suffice. Transplanting a tree is a shock to a tree or bush, but watering frequently for the first two weeks is the cure to a tree in shock.

I agree with the first poster who scolded you for spraying the poor thing. STOP THAT!

Now, put a teaspoon of epsom salt in a gallon of water and feed your tree with 2 cups of that, then water as usual.

Once you take off the extra dirt you piled on the root ball when you planted it, put the mulch ring back on and water it again. The mulch ring WILL let water through, but it needs more water than what a simple rain will provide. The ring will also protect the tops of the roots from too much sun hurting the tops of the roots.
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Old 05-18-2009, 06:49 PM
 
31,672 posts, read 40,901,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citydweller View Post
Well, I learned something new today about my dogwood. I have one of those fake mulch rings around it and decided to remove it and inspect the soil under it. Even though it has been raining a lot the dirt under the ring was dry - very dry. I was amazed at how dry everything was. I watered the tree thoroughly and it seems to be doing well. Those rings are supposed to let water through but maybe it's just the slight incline at which the tree sits. I guess I will be watering this tree all summer to keep it alive or at least until it seems to be more established. Lesson learned!
Those fake mulch rings are horrendous, just plain horrendous. I had the same problem with a Magnolia and when I removed the ring this year it is like magic. When I told the guys at Loews they were horrendous they agreed and said yup but they can't tell people that if they ask. The can agree if you bring it up however.
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Old 05-18-2009, 07:02 PM
 
1,790 posts, read 6,491,777 times
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You know I agree. I'm going to to have to buy a hoe (since I don't have one), remove the grass and put down the real mulch. I think the real mulch looks better anyways.
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Old 05-18-2009, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Floribama
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I've never had a problem with water getting through the mulch rings, but I have found that ants like to live under them.
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Old 05-18-2009, 08:54 PM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citydweller View Post
You know I agree. I'm going to to have to buy a hoe (since I don't have one), remove the grass and put down the real mulch. I think the real mulch looks better anyways.
I have a Dogwood, doing real good. Do not mulch right up to the bark as this could rot the bark. My wife did that and I pulled it away about 2" all around.
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