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Old 08-13-2009, 12:01 PM
 
3 posts, read 20,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandinmyshoes View Post
it was,...weird,scary,very intense and left me in awe once i realized it wasn't an alien cartoon character ready to drill a hole in my head.I will elaborate soon.
This is my first time posting, hope attachments will work. But what I am going to attempt to post are three views I took 10pm last night (in Colorado) of the strange, alien-looking, sort-of-hummingbird-but-not-really, big-eyed, creature flying around my newly planted Columbine. I hoped my digital camera would capture the image with only the flash so that I could see it enlarged on my computer; imagine my excitement to come away with these. I actually saw a hummingbird the other day late afternoon, and within a minute I saw this guy on some other flowers. Its total presence is so close to the hummingbird b/c of the wingspan and incredibly fast wing movement; the body itself is much smaller than a hummingbird, but several times bigger than a bumble bee. I have not found these exact markings during my research last night, but am pretty certain it is one of the Sphinx variety (Family Sphingidae). And yes, sandinmyshoes, I think this guy's ancestors starred in the kind of science fiction movies that aired on Saturday mornings in the 1960s. Really cool. Hope you enjoy the photos.
Attached Thumbnails
Hummingbird Moth-sphinx_top-side-views.jpg   Hummingbird Moth-sphinx_side-view.jpg   Hummingbird Moth-sphinx_front-view.jpg  
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Old 08-14-2009, 09:05 AM
 
3,748 posts, read 12,402,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Camper1 View Post
Wow! I wish we got those here in Texas.
We DO get them in Texas! At least here in the Houston area. Plant a Butterfly Bush it seems to really draw them in!
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Old 08-14-2009, 11:38 AM
 
28,803 posts, read 47,686,482 times
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At our first house we saw them all the time, mostly because of the flowers we grew there.

Biennial Dianthus, Columbine, Lupine, etc. They are attracted to the same flowers as a Hummingbird because they have a long tongue that reaches the nectar at the base of the flower. They are beautiful, but will give you a start the first time you see one.

If you have Columbine in bloom look at the "pointy" end at the back of the flower. See that little bulb? Pick one and bite that off. Mmmmmmm, sweet! That where the nectar is stored and that's what Hummingbirds and Hawks Moths go after.

Lupine. A bit picky about where it grows. Ours did well on the east side in very good Iowa Black dirt and pea gravel for drainage. Actually everything did well there....

lupine flower - Google Images

Go through a couple of pages if you're interested. You will see the wide variety of colors. They smell, well, like candy!
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Old 08-17-2009, 10:59 AM
 
Location: NJ
23,541 posts, read 17,216,356 times
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Default monarch and moth

These guys showed up on the same flower
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Old 08-18-2009, 12:21 PM
 
Location: St Augustine
604 posts, read 4,621,119 times
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we get them in NE Florida at dusk on the yellow lantana each night in the summer.
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Old 08-18-2009, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Maine
6,631 posts, read 13,539,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cunucu Beach View Post
I may be mistaken about this moth being the adult stage of the tomato horn worm. There are several "hummingbird" type moths and among their larval stages are both the tobacco and tomato worms. At any rate, this moth, while beautiful, probably had a larval stage that chomped down on someone's carefully tended summer garden.
You're correct!
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Old 08-18-2009, 04:07 PM
 
3 posts, read 20,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kracer View Post
These guys showed up on the same flower
On the same flower AND at the same time AND you happened to have your camera handy - how fortuitous is that!
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Old 08-19-2009, 02:06 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
20,460 posts, read 26,324,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandinmyshoes View Post
Has anyone experienced one of these.I did and it was,...weird,scary,very intense and left me in awe once i realized it wasn't an alien cartoon character ready to drill a hole in my head.I will elaborate soon.
Yup.
Saw one one evening in Benson Arizona. It was flitting from flower to flower sipping nectar just like a hummingbird (and roughly the same size). At first I thought it WAS a hummingbird but the sound of wings seemed more "leathery" - and then when I saw it's proboscis unfirl so it could drink I was blown away (clearly it was NOT a hummingbird - but I had no idea WHAT it was). I'd never heard of such a thing. It wasn't until I returned home from the trip and went online to look it up did I even have an idea what it was.

They are very, very cool.

Ken
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Old 08-23-2009, 09:08 AM
 
2 posts, read 13,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Camper1 View Post
Wow! I wish we got those here in Texas.
Very late reply, but Oh we do get those Hummingbird Moths in Texas.
I never actually see any in action but for some reason they do like to come to the side of our driveway to die. I never knew what they were called, interesting...
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 7,545 times
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Default Thank You

I just found one of these in my garden but wasn't sure what it was. I have searched for nearly 20 minutes - thanks so much!!

I don't have a website that I can upload the photo to in order to show you and since this is a public forum I'm not comfortable posting the one I just placed on Facebook but I am almost sure it's the same thing!
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