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Old 07-25-2009, 06:38 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,727,366 times
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I am ready to put some flowers in the soil after alot of work removing some old shrubs and trees. I would like to get some tall, colorful flowers like daisies, black-eyed susans, etc (think tall, country flowers). I do want them to just come back on their own next summer, and I dont want to spend a small fortune. What is the best way to go about this? Can I just buy the potted flowers now and put them in the soil, and they'll return next summer, or is it too late? Thanks. (When do flowers go on sale?)
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Old 07-25-2009, 08:39 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
38,431 posts, read 50,005,901 times
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Nurseries will start having sales now. I like Garden Phlox, it's tall and most are fragrant. I used to have a bunch but my then new neighbor hit it all with Round-up. Daylilies are nice. Coneflowers and Gallardia along with Coreopsis are good choices. Some Hosta adds variety.

phlox
HowStuffWorks "Garden Phlox: A Perennial Flower"




coneflower
Perennial Coneflower Pictures



Gaillardia
PLANTS Profile for Gaillardia aristata (common gaillardia) | USDA PLANTS


Coreopsis
Coreopsis 'Moonbeam' (Tickseed) - The Home Garden: Gardening in the Home Landscape




A word of warning, if you do a bulb bed, say for tulips, keep it segregated and don't let anyone, in my case my wife, decide to put perennials in it once the tulips are over. You lose your tulip bed that way.

Last edited by North Beach Person; 07-25-2009 at 09:52 AM.. Reason: spelling; additinal thought
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Old 07-25-2009, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,502 posts, read 49,361,728 times
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I've always considered tulips annuals anyway. But if you don't want anybody messing with your bed I understand your reasoning. the bad thing about mixing perennials with bulbs is that unless I mark my bulbs with golf tees or plastic spoons or something I end up chopping them in two when I go to plant perennials thinking I have some empty space. Then I get so mad at myself. You ever do that.? And of course I know not to remove foliage until they are brown and dead.
Regarding when to plant: things will go on sale soon or you can even find big box stores with racks of give aways which they think are dead but they aren't if they are perennials. As far as I'm concerned you can always plant perennials. You might not get much enjoyment out o them at the end of the season but if you plant right they will come back next year.
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Old 07-25-2009, 07:16 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
38,431 posts, read 50,005,901 times
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I hit the bulbs all the time. Where I am tulips will come back for several years, especially if you deep plant them from the getgo. Glads are good for several years here, too.
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Old 07-25-2009, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,502 posts, read 49,361,728 times
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In GA and NC we get glads to come back but no good with tulips. I've been tempted to try the "Southern Zones Reblooming Tulips" I've seen advertized but never have. Is that what you have.? Don't you find the blooms decrease in size each year, if they come up at all. What and where do you buy your reblooming tulips?
I've tried planing them 2 FEET deep...can you believe that trying to get them to come back. nothing seems to work. So I stick with lots of daffodils and fall blooming bulbs too. How do you mark your bulbs? With silly spoons? golf tees? hit and miss? There must be a better way than a stab(pardon the pun) in the dark.
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Old 07-26-2009, 01:36 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,727,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
In GA and NC we get glads to come back but no good with tulips. I've been tempted to try the "Southern Zones Reblooming Tulips" I've seen advertized but never have. Is that what you have.? Don't you find the blooms decrease in size each year, if they come up at all. What and where do you buy your reblooming tulips?
I've tried planing them 2 FEET deep...can you believe that trying to get them to come back. nothing seems to work. So I stick with lots of daffodils and fall blooming bulbs too. How do you mark your bulbs? With silly spoons? golf tees? hit and miss? There must be a better way than a stab(pardon the pun) in the dark.
Which fall blooming bulbs do you have?
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Old 07-26-2009, 01:37 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,727,366 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I've always considered tulips annuals anyway. But if you don't want anybody messing with your bed I understand your reasoning. the bad thing about mixing perennials with bulbs is that unless I mark my bulbs with golf tees or plastic spoons or something I end up chopping them in two when I go to plant perennials thinking I have some empty space. Then I get so mad at myself. You ever do that.? And of course I know not to remove foliage until they are brown and dead.
Regarding when to plant: things will go on sale soon or you can even find big box stores with racks of give aways which they think are dead but they aren't if they are perennials. As far as I'm concerned you can always plant perennials. You might not get much enjoyment out o them at the end of the season but if you plant right they will come back next year.
Awesome information - I will definitely have to browse around and see what I might find there!
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Old 07-26-2009, 01:38 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,727,366 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Nurseries will start having sales now. I like Garden Phlox, it's tall and most are fragrant. I used to have a bunch but my then new neighbor hit it all with Round-up. Daylilies are nice. Coneflowers and Gallardia along with Coreopsis are good choices. Some Hosta adds variety.

phlox
HowStuffWorks "Garden Phlox: A Perennial Flower"




coneflower
Perennial Coneflower Pictures



Gaillardia
PLANTS Profile for Gaillardia aristata (common gaillardia) | USDA PLANTS


Coreopsis
Coreopsis 'Moonbeam' (Tickseed) - The Home Garden: Gardening in the Home Landscape




A word of warning, if you do a bulb bed, say for tulips, keep it segregated and don't let anyone, in my case my wife, decide to put perennials in it once the tulips are over. You lose your tulip bed that way.
Thanks so much. I love these flowers and thanks for the pics. I will see if I can find them.
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Old 07-26-2009, 03:20 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
38,431 posts, read 50,005,901 times
Reputation: 50728
No Kudzu, I get tulips from mail order, usually get a catalogue about now. Now that you mention it I haven't seen it yet. Your problem with tulips may be lack of enough winter chill, most of them need a certain number of hours of below 35 degree weather. I'll put them in at 8 or 10 inches. I'm lazy so I don't really mark them with anything.
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Old 07-26-2009, 08:33 AM
 
2,466 posts, read 4,579,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jctx View Post
I am ready to put some flowers in the soil after alot of work removing some old shrubs and trees. I would like to get some tall, colorful flowers like daisies, black-eyed susans, etc (think tall, country flowers). I do want them to just come back on their own next summer, and I dont want to spend a small fortune. What is the best way to go about this? Can I just buy the potted flowers now and put them in the soil, and they'll return next summer, or is it too late? Thanks. (When do flowers go on sale?)
You could do both. Late summer early fall is an excellent time to plant certain bulbs like irises, tulips daffodils, and crocuses. Late summer early fall is also a good time to plant peonies which are also a rhizome/bulb plant. Just remember if you plant irises you just barely want to cover the bulbs with soil and you want to plant any peonies with only about 2 inches of soil covering the rhizome.

As far as daisies, coneflowers, gaillardia, black-eyed susans, and most other country looking flowers go, you just need to make sure you plant them in the evening or early morning so the heat of the day doesn't shock them any further. They may look a bit wilted for a day or two after planting them this time of year, but as long as you keep them properly watered they should snap out of it. You just want to make sure that you give them enough time to root down good before winter hits. If they have a good root system going before it gets cold they have a great chance of coming back nest spring. A good way to ensure that they get a good root system going is cut off any blooms or buds right after you plant them. This way the plant won't be focusing it's energy on the flowers but on the roots instead.

Mums and asters can be planted in the mid to late summer as well and they don't need thier blooms cut off. In fact you will probably be finding quite a few of them available really soon in the nurseries. Just make sure that you are getting the garden variety mums (they usually have smmaller blooms) or asters for cool climates if you want them to come back if you live in a cooler zone.

Bulb plants like lilies, dahlias and glads are better planted in the spring and glads and dahlias usually have to be dug up in the fall and replanted in the spring in cooler zones. Plants like geraniums can be dug up in the fall, put over into pots and brought indoors and watered occasionally over the winter and then replanted in the spring back outdoors.
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