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Old 09-02-2009, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Lynbrook
517 posts, read 2,391,305 times
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I'm trying to use these to screen the yard from a business behind us. I wanted to know how far from the fence I need to plant it. The little plastic info card that came with it said to plant them 3 feet apart - does that mean 3 feet from the fence is appropriate? Can I get away with closer?

Thanks,
Karen
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Old 09-02-2009, 10:04 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 12,114,727 times
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Of course you can plant them any way you want to.

Rose of Sharon get big, this is a large shrub. If you were to plant them 3 feet apart you're still only leaving 1 1/2 ft. spread per plant. Even that really isn't enough room I don't think.

And I'm thinking this plant isn't going to be a good screen from the neighbor you don't want. They are a deciduous shrub--they go leafless in the winter. You're in Brooklyn where winters are long and where it may be just too cold for them to thrive anyway. They're listed as a zone 5-9 plant but as a member of the hibiscus family, Rose of Sharon naturally prefers a warm climate.

As a living fence, which is what you really want, you'll be much better off with some kind of evergreen. Juniper, spruce, pine, fir, there are many sizes and varieties to choose from.
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Old 09-02-2009, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Long Island
9,668 posts, read 21,295,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azoria View Post

And I'm thinking this plant isn't going to be a good screen from the neighbor you don't want. They are a deciduous shrub--they go leafless in the winter. You're in Brooklyn where winters are long and where it may be just too cold for them to thrive anyway. They're listed as a zone 5-9 plant but as a member of the hibiscus family, Rose of Sharon naturally prefers a warm climate.

As a living fence, which is what you really want, you'll be much better off with some kind of evergreen. Juniper, spruce, pine, fir, there are many sizes and varieties to choose from.
I agree, as a screen, it doesn't work very well.

If you like the look of a deciduous plant, but want green year round as a "living fence", why not euonymous? Euonymous japonica (or another variety) can easily be trimmed to the desired shape, is basically maintenance free, has insignificant small flowers that turn into red berries (bird food!) and thrives in zones 6-9. It's also easy to propagate.
Many gardeners would be more than willing to share, I'm sure (myself included ).
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 13,436,018 times
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Perhaps a mix of ROS and evergreens would be nice too.

I planted mine 4' on center with the hopes that they will grow together. Mine have grown up more than out in the past two years, but some judicious pruning this fall should change that next year.
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Rocket City, U.S.A.
1,806 posts, read 5,412,096 times
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Euonymous Japonica.

Liking the variegated variety, had not seen this one before...(I have another kind of hardy Japonica, spotted leaf.)

OP

The problem with Rose of Sharon so far north is that you'll not have any coverage for much of the year...great for a few months and then...bare. Have them here in zone 7b, grow very well even in clay, but I only have green for...4 months? Flowers for two?
Nice accent, but I'd go with the other recommendations that you find something evergreen.
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Lynbrook
517 posts, read 2,391,305 times
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Euonymous Japonica sounds nice. My DH was thinking about Arborvitae but I like something with a little more color. Is it okay to plant them now or is it better to wait until Spring so they
ll have more time to establish roots before it gets cold?
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Long Island
9,668 posts, read 21,295,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenBo View Post
Euonymous Japonica sounds nice. My DH was thinking about Arborvitae but I like something with a little more color. Is it okay to plant them now or is it better to wait until Spring so they
ll have more time to establish roots before it gets cold?
If it were me, I'd plant them now; they'll have time to get "settled in" before Winter and come next Spring, you'll get the first new growth :-)

Whatever you decide - good luck!
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Old 09-04-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 13,436,018 times
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Go ahead and plant now, especially evergreens. Just don't wait much longer in your zone.
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Old 09-09-2009, 01:58 PM
 
Location: ROTTWEILER & LAB LAND (HEAVEN)
2,406 posts, read 5,906,489 times
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Ours are a foot away from fence & 3-4 feet apart. We planted them 13 years ago. They look great & we love them. We transplant the seedlings if we like the color. We have several different varieties.
Can't go wrong for privacy hedges.
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Old 09-09-2009, 02:44 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,776 posts, read 60,540,243 times
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Why not Crepe Myrtle?? My experience with Rose of Sharon is it doesn't like runoff from a shingle roof. I've had many die from getting runoff from our shingle roof. Thought our big dog was rubbing against them busting the roots. But, no had to be petroleum leaching from shingles. Yes, Rose of Sharon grows long and falls over almost needs binding to stand upright.
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