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Old 10-15-2009, 11:27 AM
 
432 posts, read 3,517,224 times
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I bought a new house in January, and it came with an newly-planted oak tree that is about 8 feet tall. This past weekend i noticed a pile of acorns at the base of the tree, with some more growing on the tree itself. The acorns are green in color.

I thought oaks trees began to produce acorns when they are about 20 years old? I'm pretty sure this tree is much younger than that!
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Old 10-15-2009, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Fly-over country.
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Hunters will buy modified oaks that produce early. Perhaps you have an oak from a tree farm that employs grafting to get early acorn production? That's the only thing I could think of, and you're right, any googly search will say "20 years" or so. I wonder if stress on the tree could cause it? I kind of doubt it.
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Old 10-15-2009, 03:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caution View Post
Hunters will buy modified oaks that produce early. Perhaps you have an oak from a tree farm that employs grafting to get early acorn production? That's the only thing I could think of, and you're right, any googly search will say "20 years" or so. I wonder if stress on the tree could cause it? I kind of doubt it.
Well the weather basically changed from a historical drought to heavy rains almost instantly. Some other plants in the yard, as well as the grass, seem to be stressed by the sudden weather change. I wonder what effect that has.

Thanks for the info, i didn't know that such a thing as modified oaks existed.
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Old 10-15-2009, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Fly-over country.
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I didn't either really. I was curious since I'm a tree nut and started looking up things about oaks. I came across a white paper on grafting swamp white oaks. In recording various results, the author noted acorn production within 4-5 years. He commented that this could prove to be attractive to certain markets.

I also know a bunch of hunters who scout areas for various trees and plant specific trees to bring in wildlife. Some are obsessive about it, and it's spawned a "hunting crop" mini-industry.

That being said, I don't know much about oaks at all, except for the fact that Pin Oaks are over planted in new subdivisions. :-)
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Old 10-15-2009, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
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I'm not a big fan of oaks. They don't have nice fall color (brown) and they are a pain to clean up after. We have several older oak trees that drop what seems like thousands of acorns. We have to go around every spring and pull up all the seedlings from the acorns in our flower beds. Then there is the huge number of squirrels that now dig up the lawn burying acorns and then return to dig them up.
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Old 10-15-2009, 09:19 PM
 
432 posts, read 3,517,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
I'm not a big fan of oaks. They don't have nice fall color (brown) and they are a pain to clean up after. We have several older oak trees that drop what seems like thousands of acorns. We have to go around every spring and pull up all the seedlings from the acorns in our flower beds. Then there is the huge number of squirrels that now dig up the lawn burying acorns and then return to dig them up.
i guess here in SA we are more fond of them. Oaks are the predominant native species and they are pretty much all over the place.
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Old 10-16-2009, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
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Originally Posted by bjornb17 View Post
i guess here in SA we are more fond of them. Oaks are the predominant native species and they are pretty much all over the place.
They are everywhere in New England as well ,but they are more prized for firewood. Sugar Maples are the prefered trees around here. Spectacular reds, oranges and yellow leaves this time of year and then you can't beat the maple syrup come spring time.
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