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Old 11-08-2009, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Sequoyah County USA
141 posts, read 309,324 times
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I would like to transplant honeysuckle along a fence line in my front yard. I have never done anything like this and have no clue where to begin. I basically have a brown thumb and need some knowledge from people who actually know what they're talking about.

Any help would be great.
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Old 11-08-2009, 04:44 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,569 posts, read 17,076,386 times
Reputation: 16676
There are approximately 180 varieties of honeysuckle and some are non-native - and invasive. I sure hope if you plan to transplant it that the location you move it to is one that you want that honeysuckle there forever and that you want nothing else to grow. Honeysuckle vines can kill trees. Did you do a google search on how to propagate?
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Old 11-09-2009, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Newport, NC
956 posts, read 3,901,602 times
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Honeysuckles generally are pretty tough plants. As long as the ones you intend to move are not too large, you can just bareroot them. Drive a shovel into the ground all around the plant - the smaller the plant the closer to the main stem(s). Then just pry it out, shake off the dirt, and put it in the new location. I would suggest a minimum of 6 inches all around the plant unless it is quite small. Don't replant any deeper than the plant was in the ground originally. Water.
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Old 11-09-2009, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 13,561,157 times
Reputation: 1509
Now is the perfect time to do this. Even a small piece of root left will become a new plant. If you'd rather not move one, you can take cuttings in February. Make sure there are a couple leaf nodes below the soil you stick them in. Water and place in a shady spot until mid June or so. Those that root should show lots of new growth. Those that didn't will be dead twigs. This is one of the easiest plants to propagate using hardwood cuttings. Just be sure you want a LOT of honeysuckle. Given free range on a fence, they can take over in a matter of a year.
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Old 11-09-2009, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Vermont, grew up in Colorado and California
5,296 posts, read 6,830,580 times
Reputation: 9233
I want to get some, I think Hummingbirds love them.
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Old 11-10-2009, 08:53 AM
 
4,906 posts, read 8,026,985 times
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If y'all want honeysuckle that won't eat your fence or house and that hummingbirds really love, plant coral honeysuckle:

Floridata: Lonicera sempervirens

I have a couple that I dug out of a neighbor's yard along an unkempt fencerow....it's a native plant....they've done really well and are so beautiful when they're blooming, and evergreen, too.

I once saw one growing up into a small tree....that thing was spectacular when it bloomed, and it won't hurt the tree because it's not a rampant grower like Japanese honeysuckle (avoid this at all costs!). I am now training one of mine to go up into a nearby small saucer magnolia. And it can take a little shade and still bloom....both of mine are in partial shade and bloom....as a matter of fact, the one in more shade has grown and bloomed better than the one that gets more sun (this is in the deep South, though....this probably would not apply in the north.)
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
38,974 posts, read 69,288,051 times
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You can't kill honeysuckle, even if you try. Good luck!
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Old 11-11-2009, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,941,528 times
Reputation: 912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You can't kill honeysuckle, even if you try. Good luck!
You're not kidding! Its considered invasive here in Cincy.
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