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Old 04-06-2010, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,048 posts, read 11,048,813 times
Reputation: 1961

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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Yeah, I add wood ashes to my garden. Problem there is figuring out ratios. I trust my ashes because I know what I burn but I wouldn't necessarily trust my neighbors (treated wood being burned for one).
This is a good point. You don't want to add anything to a garden that would be toxic to your plants.
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Old 04-06-2010, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,048 posts, read 11,048,813 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by paperhouse View Post
In VA, Lime. You can start with 40lbs per 1000 sq ft, but a soil test would tell you just how much.
According to the book I have been reading (the Vegetable Gardener's Bible by Edward C. Smith), how much to add depends on soil pH and soil type. Based on what's in the book, 40 lbs. per 1000 square feet would be about right if your soil is a combination of sandy and loam.

The following recommendations are for raising the pH of 100 square feet of soil by one unit (for example going from a pH of 4.5 to 5.5). I believe this would be to treat the top six inches of soil.

Here are the basic recommendations:

For sandy soil, use 2.5 lbs of calcitic limestone, 2-3 lbs. of dolomitic limestone, or 3-4 lbs. of wood ashes.

For loam soil, use 6.5 lbs. of calcitic limestone, 6 lbs. of dolomitic limestone, or 8 lbs. of wood ashes.

For clay soil, use 9 lbs. calcitic limestone, 7-8 lbs. of dolomitic limestone, or 9-10.5 lbs. of wood ashes.
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Old 04-07-2010, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,513 posts, read 5,918,912 times
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Blueberries would do well if the ph is 4.5 or even a bit lower.
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Old 04-07-2010, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 13,451,665 times
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oooh, blueberries. That's a great idea for that space. And Camellia sasanqua. They can handle a little more sun than the Japonicas. And they bloom in the fall instead of spring.
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Old 04-07-2010, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 29,256,305 times
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Would blueberries attract critters? I'd like to plant some but wonder if I'll attract deer, rodents, foxes, etc.
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Old 04-07-2010, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 13,451,665 times
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Birds mostly. They love the fruit just before it's ripe. Deer may nibble the leaves and take the buds, but they rarely come back for the fruit. Rabbits love the foliage too. So toss seeds of red clover into your neighbor's yard.
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Old 04-10-2010, 08:51 AM
 
22,624 posts, read 20,523,106 times
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Holly trees give the look of pine trees and can be beautiful once they establish themselves in about 10 or 20 years. Instant Christmas card landscape. I see big holly trees, dense ones allowed to grow out and up, and they are something. Just remember to have a male( no berries) in with the females if you want berries.
Shrubs are nice, burning bush, boxwood, even arborvitae.
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Old 04-10-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 13,036,084 times
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If it was my property I would get the soil back to a acceptable ph level and then cover the entire hillside with a wildflower mix with a few smaller ornamental trees here and there.
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Old 04-10-2010, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
2,932 posts, read 7,389,370 times
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My dad cut all the trees in the back yard one year and then grounded the stumps. They left a lot of the wood chips in the lawn. The lumberjacks told us that it would be hard to grow grass the first couple years because the decaying wood will leach nitrogen out of the soil. Let the wood decay a couple years then plant grass. Or get rid of the chips?
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