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Old 04-29-2010, 10:40 AM
 
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I intensively graze over 50 acres in Minnesota.

Grass will grow on low ph soils
Legumes ( alfalfa and clover need a higher ph than grass)

Also, it takes abour a ton per acre of lime to raise the ph just .1 higher.

Grazers to the north of me can still grow grass, but their soil has such a low ph ( 5.5) that it would be cost prohibitive to lime it to 6,7 for optimol ph for alfalfa.

What I'm saying is if you have problems growing grass, the reasons won't be addressed by just adding lime.

I have seen lush, lowland, meadows that are very acidic.
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
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take a small jar of your dirt to the closest Southern States, the co-op, ask them what you need. These people are very helpful.
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Old 04-30-2010, 11:14 AM
 
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Thanks everyone.

I think the best thing we can do is to get a soil test.
Grass is growing anyway and looks at lot better than this time last year when we weren't living here, which is a bonus.
I wanted to try and get it beefed up before it gets really hot to try and keep it alive.

I wish we only had a postage stamp size lawn-would far rather look after beds, shrubs or woodland garden than lawn in this climate!


The co-operative extension site looks great, lots of really useful information.

Susan
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Old 05-02-2010, 01:50 PM
 
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Try under buckets.
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Old 05-02-2010, 01:51 PM
 
523 posts, read 839,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susan42 View Post
Thanks everyone.

I think the best thing we can do is to get a soil test.
Grass is growing anyway and looks at lot better than this time last year when we weren't living here, which is a bonus.
I wanted to try and get it beefed up before it gets really hot to try and keep it alive.

I wish we only had a postage stamp size lawn-would far rather look after beds, shrubs or woodland garden than lawn in this climate!


The co-operative extension site looks great, lots of really useful information.

Susan
Good idea on the soil test.
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Old 05-03-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Where the real happy cows reside!
4,281 posts, read 9,627,528 times
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Bare patches in the lawn could also be due to White Grubs (Japanese Beetle larvae). The nasties live in the dirt and like to eat the roots. You can get pesticides to kill them, but would recommend Milky Spores. It's all natural and gets stronger and more effective over time.

Good luck with the turf!
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Old 05-03-2010, 06:00 PM
 
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If you use fetizer on your lawn its likely acidic after a time. I often spread pelletised lime on my lawn at the start of winter so it will dissolve slowly when it rains.The pellets spread easy with a spreader .
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Old 05-03-2010, 06:37 PM
 
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Even with similar soil tests, type of soil plays a big difference.

Sandy or clay soil can be quite challenging compared to soil that is a black loam.
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Old 05-05-2010, 09:57 AM
 
111 posts, read 288,558 times
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I have a beautiful green lawn, and I have acid, shady, poor and compact soil... I have a moss lawn! No mowing, beautiful, don't have to water, no chemicals. It is more rewarding (and easier) to find out what kind of soil you have and plant what likes it there, rather than try to change nature. Your wild strawberry is a great native groundcover plant.
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