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Old 05-07-2010, 07:29 AM
 
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I was going to suggest Gardenias too. I love Camillas but they only last a short time. The hydrangas they have now are amazing. I have had good luck with Roses in this zone too although I have killed a few along the way.

Hellebores have a small flower and a low plant.
http://www.hellebores.org/sitebuilde...06-250x250.jpg

http://www.hellebores.org/

You can get hibiscus that will with stand the winter. They have them with 12" flowers
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Old 05-08-2010, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Floribama
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Dwarf Yaupon Holly is probably about the lowest maintenance one you can get, and it's native.
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Old 05-09-2010, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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Thanks for all the suggestions. I see many of them are grown up north too. My fear was that it was too hot for anything I'm familiar with and I'd need to start learning from scratch. I will enjoy prowling some garden centers and asking questions.
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Old 05-09-2010, 10:01 AM
 
Location: NC, USA
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favorite low shrub

cabbage, planted about 16 inches apart
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Old 05-09-2010, 10:16 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
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OK, OK, so ya don't like the cabbage idea, ......how about a row of tomato plants---decorative and utilitarian.
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Old 05-09-2010, 10:36 PM
 
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I live in Charleston, SC which I would describe as 95% similar to savannah's climate.

Asiatic jasmine (more of a thick ground cover) and boxwoods come to mind.

I think you should look at gumpo azealeas. They are naturally short so you don't have to prune them. Get white and they are less garish than the pinks.

I'm another person with cast iron plants facing east- they tend not to like the sun as much but do well in shade. And they easiest means of pruning is running over them with the lawnmower during the first moving every year.

I'd also think about loriope- it gets thick after a while and can grow to about a foot during the year. It is really a clumping grass and also recieves pruning via lawnmower at the start of spring. Skip variegated.

Another thing would be a dwarf gardenia. They tend to have darker foiliage than azaleas and look neater/cleaner on their own in my eyes.

The last thing I'll add is the shrub form of crepe myrtle. Haven't tried it myself but I've seen other people have luck with it. And the knockout roses are also very popular. I imagine they will stay short if you prune them back but cannot see them fitting in with an asian garden.
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Old 05-10-2010, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
39,151 posts, read 48,110,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrpeatie View Post
I live in Charleston, SC which I would describe as 95% similar to savannah's climate.

Asiatic jasmine (more of a thick ground cover) and boxwoods come to mind.

I think you should look at gumpo azealeas. They are naturally short so you don't have to prune them. Get white and they are less garish than the pinks.

I'm another person with cast iron plants facing east- they tend not to like the sun as much but do well in shade. And they easiest means of pruning is running over them with the lawnmower during the first moving every year.

I'd also think about loriope- it gets thick after a while and can grow to about a foot during the year. It is really a clumping grass and also recieves pruning via lawnmower at the start of spring. Skip variegated.

Another thing would be a dwarf gardenia. They tend to have darker foiliage than azaleas and look neater/cleaner on their own in my eyes.

The last thing I'll add is the shrub form of crepe myrtle. Haven't tried it myself but I've seen other people have luck with it. And the knockout roses are also very popular. I imagine they will stay short if you prune them back but cannot see them fitting in with an asian garden.
I think y'all must use the cast iron plant like we use hostas up north? They look kind of similar, but I wonder if hostas do well in the southern heat?
I have liriope here, so glad to know it grows there too.
Roses sound a bit more high maintenance than I'm shooting for.
I guess I'll do some snooping around once I get there and then plant in the fall. Someone suggested it's already a bit late to plant shrubs because of the heat.
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Old 05-10-2010, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I think y'all must use the cast iron plant like we use hostas up north? They look kind of similar, but I wonder if hostas do well in the southern heat?
I have liriope here, so glad to know it grows there too.
Roses sound a bit more high maintenance than I'm shooting for.
I guess I'll do some snooping around once I get there and then plant in the fall. Someone suggested it's already a bit late to plant shrubs because of the heat.
It's not too late to plant shrubs in the South. The high here in SC yesterday was around 70. We will be planting a few dozen shrubs this week, after planting that many last week, and we will continue to do so through much of the summer. Planting in the summer just requires more water and diligence. If a shrub can survive in a nursery in a black plastic container all summer, it can do well in the ground with adequate water and mulch after planting. The beauty of living here in the South is that you can plant and transplant all year round. I think that people take the "ideal planting time" thing too far because it is a little bit harder to care for a newly planted shrub in the heat. However, I would rather have that plant in the ground at my house where it can be enjoyed rather than at the nursery.
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Old 05-10-2010, 09:36 AM
 
9,431 posts, read 11,382,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I think y'all must use the cast iron plant like we use hostas up north? They look kind of similar, but I wonder if hostas do well in the southern heat?
I have liriope here, so glad to know it grows there too.
Roses sound a bit more high maintenance than I'm shooting for.
I guess I'll do some snooping around once I get there and then plant in the fall. Someone suggested it's already a bit late to plant shrubs because of the heat.
Knock-out roses are very low maintenance! Love these plants.
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Old 05-10-2010, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Floribama
15,881 posts, read 32,971,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I think y'all must use the cast iron plant like we use hostas up north? They look kind of similar, but I wonder if hostas do well in the southern heat?
Pretty much, but cast iron plants get much taller than hostas. I have some variegated hosta that does fine around a few of my trees, but they get shade most of the day.
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