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Old 05-23-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: ST paul MN
622 posts, read 1,468,985 times
Reputation: 334

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true. sadly now there are so many invasiove plants i think the natives dont really have much of a future outside of homeowners now.
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Old 05-23-2010, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 14,360,586 times
Reputation: 32952
I have something like a creeping charlie that comes back every year. It's one of the few things that does well in the shade but the seeds scatter everywhere and come up all over the place. Here it is growing in the crotch of a tree....

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g146/seagrape/garden/creepingcharlie.jpg (broken link)
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Old 05-23-2010, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Long Island
9,337 posts, read 19,750,281 times
Reputation: 5066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cunucu Beach View Post
I have something like a creeping charlie that comes back every year. It's one of the few things that does well in the shade but the seeds scatter everywhere and come up all over the place. Here it is growing in the crotch of a tree....
Hmmm, looks like something I know - you should be getting pretty little blue flowers soon :-)
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Old 05-23-2010, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 14,360,586 times
Reputation: 32952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elke Mariotti View Post
Hmmm, looks like something I know - you should be getting pretty little blue flowers soon :-)
Yes, you are right. It will be having little blue flowers in a few more weeks.
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Old 05-23-2010, 10:20 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 11,559,179 times
Reputation: 4916
Looks like a variety of wandering jew.
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Old 07-03-2010, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,106,289 times
Reputation: 1236
Quote:
Originally Posted by lllowe View Post
Please stop planting exotic invasive plants. Bamboo, mimosa, chinese wisteria, privet, english ivy, japanese honeysuckle...Please oh please read about invasive plants and stop planting them, especially near property lines where neighbors inevitably have to deal with them. There are plenty of non-aggressive, easy care, and BEAUTIFUL native species to plant. Thank you for your consideration.
Add hardy kiwi fruit (baby kiwi), maypops (hardy passionfruit), honey mesquite and honey locust to your list. They all have their virtues - edible fruit from all of them. But boy howdy can they spread if you are very careful with them.

Baby kiwis have started to become a problem in Connecticut, according to the CT DOT, who has cleared 100' vines from a few roadsides in the state.
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Old 07-03-2010, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Funky Town
15,927 posts, read 7,320,094 times
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It's funny you mention mimosas, as I have tried to get mine to grow for the past 4 years. I guess it's getting too much sun and not enough water, and the hard freeze we had this past winter, didn't help too much either.

I also planted a wysteria in a bed this year before reading this thread, and am wondering if I should move it, as it has attached it's trendils to several other plants in the flower bed.

Is Japanese honeysuckle the same thing as purple honey suckle? If so, I have it growning on my wrought iron arbor for the past 10 years. I trim it back every few years, so it's under control.

This forum is really helpful and informative. I only wish I had read it sooner.

As for invasive plants I've come accross are the tall katy petunias, obediant plants, and morning glories. I can't seem to keep they're seeds from spreading!
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Old 07-03-2010, 07:18 AM
 
1,442 posts, read 2,283,596 times
Reputation: 915
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetie Pie View Post
It's funny you mention mimosas, as I have tried to get mine to grow for the past 4 years. I guess it's getting too much sun and not enough water, and the hard freeze we had this past winter, didn't help too much either.

I also planted a wysteria in a bed this year before reading this thread, and am wondering if I should move it, as it has attached it's trendils to several other plants in the flower bed.

Is Japanese honeysuckle the same thing as purple honey suckle? If so, I have it growning on my wrought iron arbor for the past 10 years. I trim it back every few years, so it's under control.

This forum is really helpful and informative. I only wish I had read it sooner.

As for invasive plants I've come accross are the tall katy petunias, obediant plants, and morning glories. I can't seem to keep they're seeds from spreading!
For me, the mimosa is a major pest - no large one's anywhere near, but they pop up everywhere/anywhere. Worse was Roanoke where not only did we have a mimosa problem, but worse were tree of heaven, locust, and kudzu (there were no kudzu areas within a mille, yet the stuff was popping up everywhere in the non-grass wooded areas of the yard, and it grows a foot a day it seems - part time job killing this stuff)
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Old 07-04-2010, 08:47 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
433 posts, read 1,021,032 times
Reputation: 610
One plant that I've learned I can't stand is morning glories. When we lived in Illinois we had a privacy fence around the patio of the house we bought. When they came up I thought how lovely. Then they spread to the yard, the garden, and any other place that you didn't want them. I learned that I didn't like them so much anymore.
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Old 07-04-2010, 09:49 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 37,835,456 times
Reputation: 20198
I don't think I've seen any mimosas around here, but I've seen a few silk trees, and they are sometimes called mimosa (even though they're not mimosa). I always thought they were awesome and wished there were more of them around. Their crisp but sweet scent can be smelled a block away downwind and make it a delight to ride a bike past.
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