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Old 05-31-2010, 07:40 PM
 
2,319 posts, read 4,200,174 times
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I meant "arrested". Oh well.

Your plants are very cool!
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Old 05-31-2010, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,498 posts, read 45,489,802 times
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I commend you on trying to learn about your garden. Alot of folks would just plow it under and put in rows of annuals. yuck---sounds like you have a great cottage garden going there. Surely hope somebody can help you with on site id and care.
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Old 05-31-2010, 09:32 PM
 
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I hope so, no kudzu. I will be posting on this forum, I'm sure. I am trying to learn. I hate annuals! I wouldn't waste my money. We lived in the Poconos for 6 years, and we couldn't have any sort of veggie garden or flower garden because the deer demolished everything. In fact, when we sold our house, the new owner said, "You did a great job on the inside, but the outside needs work." I thought, "You'll find out." I guess he did.

It's a lot of fun to learn about all these plants. I think they are pretty "standard" plants. It's just that I don't know anything about flowers. We had vegetables growing up so I know about tomatoes, okra, beans, corn, etc. However, poppies, clematis, and rose campion are new to me. Some of the flowers (irises, daffodils, tulips, day lilies) have to be moved. They are in a big mess. They are easier to deal with. The clematis is in a bad spot with a leaning trellis (it's about to fall). I need to and want to move it, but I'm afraid it will die. Ugh. No planning went into this garden. It's driving me nuts!
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Old 06-01-2010, 06:47 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
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If I lived near you I'd come over and help. And maybe take a few unwanted/excess plants.
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Old 06-01-2010, 07:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sophialee View Post
If I lived near you I'd come over and help. And maybe take a few unwanted/excess plants.
Ha ha! Me, too!

I wish I could grow poppies. They don't seem to do well in the heat here. I read once that Shirley poppies would grown in the deep South and I scattered some seeds, but nothing came up.
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Old 06-01-2010, 07:52 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,707,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sophialee View Post
If I lived near you I'd come over and help. And maybe take a few unwanted/excess plants.

LOL on that offer, wish I had made it first! I think I live closer, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peppermint View Post
I hope so, no kudzu. I will be posting on this forum, I'm sure. I am trying to learn. I hate annuals! I wouldn't waste my money. We lived in the Poconos for 6 years, and we couldn't have any sort of veggie garden or flower garden because the deer demolished everything. In fact, when we sold our house, the new owner said, "You did a great job on the inside, but the outside needs work." I thought, "You'll find out." I guess he did.
I use annuals to fill in spots for now and love to use them for accents and pots on the deck. They can give your garden a feeling of lushness and constant blooms while the perennials have their bursts. So I like annuals, too.

I'm sure the new owner will certainly be more educated in a couple of years. I lived in a similar area in NY where the deer problems were actually escalating over the years because the populations were increasing as their habitat was thinning. I think I tried just about every trick, yet every year they seem to find another 'deer resistant' plant that they could learn to like. It has been a joy to create a new garden from scratch without worrying about critters eating everything (well except for voles). I'm also learning all about gardening in full hot sun after working around mostly part shade to deep shade. If you must get rid of any of your plants keep me in mind! LOL

Quote:
Originally Posted by peppermint View Post
It's a lot of fun to learn about all these plants. I think they are pretty "standard" plants. It's just that I don't know anything about flowers. We had vegetables growing up so I know about tomatoes, okra, beans, corn, etc. However, poppies, clematis, and rose campion are new to me. Some of the flowers (irises, daffodils, tulips, day lilies) have to be moved. They are in a big mess. They are easier to deal with. The clematis is in a bad spot with a leaning trellis (it's about to fall). I need to and want to move it, but I'm afraid it will die. Ugh. No planning went into this garden. It's driving me nuts!

That "style" of gardening seems to be quite popular in these parts with older homes. A lovely very elderly lady a few doors down from me has got all kinds of plants growing all over in little clumps and tangles and unplanned bunches. I'm constantly eyeballing the latest thing to pop out and bloom as I walk by. She has things for cutting (she makes little bouquets) and knows the names, but doesn't seem to put much effort into the garden, the effort I mean: mulch, divide and replant older perennials and weed. Several farm houses around here have similar looking gardens and one of my close by neighbors who is younger seems to be on the same trac as she keeps adding new plants and little decorative statues all over the place!

Friends just purchased a home a couple of miles away and will be renovating it piece by piece. She loves gardening and is excited by what is there... but dreading getting it organized. It was an incredible overgrown tangled and intertwined mess when we surveyed before she headed back to KY to sell her old place. Not much in the way of weeds, and the soil was obviously enriched and very good, so someone obviously cared and could garden, but absolutely no "plan" was visible!! I'm not sure that even "cottage garden" describes the randomness. It's as if a plant lover got and bought plants and then just stuck them in the first empty spot they could find. Small plants hidden behind larger ones, clashing colors and all. Totally random! I will say after being around one too many suburban landscapes with lined up bushes and no flowers that the messy gardens have more appeal.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:27 AM
 
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J&Em, absolutely! Thanks for posting this. I think you're right. I think the previous owner's wife just liked flowers and when she thought a spot was empty, she would plant something new. Fortunately, most of the plants are bulbs and can be moved without killing them. We don't want to kill anything, but as we reslope the yard (for drainage reasons), some plants will have to be moved. I'm in the same boat with your friends, except there are weeds and poison ivy in my beds. YIKES!
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
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What kind of clematis is it? Does it have large flowers, about 4-6 inches across? If so, you can cut it to the ground and move it. It will regrow from the roots. That type actually benefits from being cut back hard. BUT, if it's a trumpet shaped flower, you need to prune it after flowering because it only grows new flowers on this year's wood. Post a picture. We'll at least know the type if not the name.

The plants you have do sound fairly common. That's not a bad thing at all. I grow the standards myself. Shasta daisies, Black Eyed Susans, Bee Balm, etc.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,498 posts, read 45,489,802 times
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Although I earned my living as a professional landscape designer for many years in Atlanta, I grew to hate "planned" gardens with the hired gardener kind of look. Row upon row of begonias, cockscomb, etc. Houses began to look like apartment complexes and shopping centers. It drove me to distraction and I started getting really into plant collecting. I always bought at least 3 of everything but didn't always plant them close to each other.

English cottage gardens can look messy to some but it takes quite a bit of work to get that look!

I always plant my perennials much closer than the tags say and I do so to shade out weeds. And yes I do go to the nursery and buy what I like and stand around in the garden with a shovel in one hand and the pot in the other and say.

"Ummmm now where will I put this".

I know the sun, moisture requirements of most so there is some semi plan going on. But I have been married to an engineer for more than 30 years and his obsessive planning and studying has driven me nuts. I call it analysis paralysis. I guess my garden is my own world of rebelion. It's the only thing that has some spontenaity in my life.

And I'm glad I am not the only one coveting peppermints unknown treasures. I even dreamed about it last night. I told her all the things I wanted were yucky weeds and then snuck in the night to dig them all up and take home......ahhhh I hated to wake up.

BTW I have stopped by "wild" gardens in the past and offered to divide perennials if I could take some with me. Most people are happpy to share and have somebody do the hard work for them.

Peppermint-don't move anything till fall or winter. They just won't make it in the summer except maybe iris which are almost impossible to kill. Just lay them on top of the ground and away they go.
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Old 06-01-2010, 10:54 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
11,626 posts, read 15,255,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
They just won't make it in the summer except maybe iris which are almost impossible to kill. Just lay them on top of the ground and away they go.
I just discovered this is quite literally true. Last fall a friend give me some plants and I overlooked a bag of Iris rhizomes. It overwintered in a plastic bag in a corner of my driveway. I was totally amazed to see it take off and bloom earlier this year, just growing out of whatever scant amount of soil was in the bag!
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