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Old 06-03-2010, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 14,381,028 times
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I transplanted half a dozen small cabbage plants into the ground less than a week ago and already the leaves are getting eaten. This is the first year I have tried cabbage. I hear it is hard to grow because of the various cabbage caterpillars but I wasn't expecting it to start so soon. I'm not opposed to "non-organic" methods of pest control so I would like to hear from both organic and non-organic gardeners, please.
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Old 06-03-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Sevin dust or there is an organic form of bacteria that kills cabbage loopers. Can't remember the name only that it starts with a "T".
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Old 06-03-2010, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Sevin dust or there is an organic form of bacteria that kills cabbage loopers. Can't remember the name only that it starts with a "T".
Bacillus thurigiensis, I think it's called. Bt. I used it on my tomatoes when I lived in CA. Worked great on horn worms, which always plagued my tomato plants in CA but, so far, I have not had them here in NE.

I didn't see any of the cabbage loopers on them and since the plants have been in the ground less than a week, I really doubt if it could be that this early. It has barely warmed up here. However, we do have grasshoppers already. Maybe it's those pesky critters.

Thanks for the quick reply. I'll get some Sevin and start dusting.
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Old 06-03-2010, 09:39 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
433 posts, read 1,021,772 times
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I have used Bt on cabbage for loopers and also for some grasshoppers. Hand picking and squashing is also a way to get rid of them. You can also cover the plants when you plant them with lightweight row covers or individual hats to prevent the cabbage moths from laying their eggs.
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Old 06-03-2010, 10:08 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
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Take one bulb of Garlic, break it all apart and remove the outer skin of the individual pieces. With a sharp knife, cut the garlic pieces into very small slices, mince, then...put all of the pieces in a squirt bottle, 12 oz. or there abouts. Fill with warmish water and let set for two days. then, spray the plants you wish to protect.
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Old 06-04-2010, 07:20 AM
 
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I give my cabbage plants a light dusting of self-rising flour (the kind you use to make bisculit). The offending bugs/worms can't digest it and they die.
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Old 06-04-2010, 09:39 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hey teach View Post
I give my cabbage plants a light dusting of self-rising flour (the kind you use to make bisculit). The offending bugs/worms can't digest it and they die.
That's is way cool. I'll have to try that !
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Old 06-04-2010, 01:32 PM
 
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Never heard of the flour thing. Sevin works, row covers work, and a bait plant of brussel sprouts or broccoli helps.
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Old 06-04-2010, 01:40 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Never heard of the flour thing. Sevin works, row covers work, and a bait plant of brussel sprouts or broccoli helps.
Maybe the self-rising flour rises in their stomachs and they explode....
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Old 06-04-2010, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 14,381,028 times
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I got some Sevin today when I was in town. We have lots of grasshoppers here so I don't think the self-rising flour would work on them. Don't know if the Sevin will either but will give it a try. Will dust them tomorrow and see if the damage stops. Thanks, everyone, for the fine suggestions.
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