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Old 06-06-2010, 10:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
We lived in Lewisville, from April on you could see people in their yards planting their annuals, trimming the crape Mertlys (spelling) and hanging baskets everywhere as well as planting some veggies. Of course much of Texas has families from all over the country, just like most parts of Atlanta.
Yes, I think it is too hot for geraniums but there are so many other annual and perenial flowers and trees. I have seen the same, by the way in the burbs, among the newer homes in Texas.

The Op might see some difference because of the weather in New England. The cooler temps can help some flowers flurish better than the heat in the south.
Yes, that's very true. And some flowers that we use as spring or winter flowers probably flourish all summer there. I know I get frustrated when i pick up a gardening mag and they're talking about doing summer containers or whatever and they throw in something like pansies. We grow those in the winter and replace them in spring!
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Old 06-06-2010, 10:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Dusty Rhodes View Post
Why no love of gardens among mainstream Southerners?..

Atlanta is not exactly a representative sampling of the south. Augusta does landscaping quite well, as does Richmond, Greensboro, Durham, Charleston, Memphis, New Orleans, Biloxi, Savanna, Nashville. As for Atlanta......Well.......ever since the Yankees burned it, it has never been the same.
That's what I thought too; but then again, we went through many places in the larger state of Georgia as well as Alabama and a bit of Tennessee- and I don't see much difference from your typical Atlanta suburb in the way of "flowers surrounding the house".

It must be the hot weather after all and people's disinclination to be outside and fuss over flower pots or what have you, when you deal with 90+ temperatures and high humidity. After all, I myself only tried flowers on the balcony only once when we were there and we managed to kill them in two weeks top. Never tried anything else ever since.
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Old 06-06-2010, 03:10 PM
 
Location: In the AC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
That's what I thought too; but then again, we went through many places in the larger state of Georgia as well as Alabama and a bit of Tennessee- and I don't see much difference from your typical Atlanta suburb in the way of "flowers surrounding the house".

It must be the hot weather after all and people's disinclination to be outside and fuss over flower pots or what have you, when you deal with 90+ temperatures and high humidity. After all, I myself only tried flowers on the balcony only once when we were there and we managed to kill them in two weeks top. Never tried anything else ever since.
This is a really weird thread.

Maybe you don't recognize plants that grow in the south? Looking out my window, every neighbor I see has annuals, perinneals and flowering shrubs and trees. The entrances to subdivisions are all lush. The medians are filled with crape myrtles, daylillies, abelias, and clarissa hollies.

Maybe you never got the chance to visit people's backyards where many people focus their gardening? Like many people, we landscape more formally in the front with a smaller variety of annuals, etc., and go wild in the backyard.
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Old 06-06-2010, 03:13 PM
 
Location: In the AC
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Originally Posted by sophialee View Post
Hey now, I have $2000 handbags and I get my hands dirty!
I don't have a $2,000 handbag (or even a $200 one) but thanks to my husband I have $2,000 worth of soil amendment and mulch in my backyard. Maybe I can make a moss purse...
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Old 06-06-2010, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
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Originally Posted by msm_teacher View Post
I don't have a $2,000 handbag (or even a $200 one) but thanks to my husband I have $2,000 worth of soil amendment and mulch in my backyard. Maybe I can make a moss purse...
Tuck some lady slipper orchids into it. Make it festive!
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Old 06-06-2010, 05:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by msm_teacher View Post
Maybe you never got the chance to visit people's backyards .
Maybe. After all, when I drive by through suburbs I don't get invited by everyone to visit their backyards. Those that I did visit didn't have anything in the back yard. That's just my experience.

It could be that I may have indeed focused on the larger Atlanta area where everyone is busy commuting 3 hours a day. Maybe in the larger South people's houses are more colorful.

I'll just end this with a shrug of the shoulders. I didn't find out anything conclusive.
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Old 06-06-2010, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
Yes, that's very true. And some flowers that we use as spring or winter flowers probably flourish all summer there. I know I get frustrated when i pick up a gardening mag and they're talking about doing summer containers or whatever and they throw in something like pansies. We grow those in the winter and replace them in spring!
yep, first sign of spring the wonderful and beautiful pansies go to sleep or maybe it is pansy heaven. Sort a like the Armadillos sleep by the side of the road with their legs straight up in the air.

Nita

ps: in So Calif we were told Pansies would bloom until the first of July. Well I know they can not really tell time, but almost every year, on exactly July 1st they died.
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Old 06-06-2010, 08:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by syracusa View Post

I'll just end this with a shrug of the shoulders. I didn't find out anything conclusive.
Well, you did ask if geraniums can be grown in the south, and the answer is "yes", with qualifications.

Referring to botanical names, true geraniums are a perennial and can be planted in the yard, and if I remember correctly from my reading, do fine in the south. But probably what you are referring to is pelargonium, and I believe those must be kept in pots in the south, but I don't know why. I've never cared much for them, so I've never grown any, but my mom has, and people all over the south grow them in pots.
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Old 06-06-2010, 09:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Luvvarkansas View Post
But probably what you are referring to is pelargonium, and I believe those must be kept in pots in the south
Yes, pelargoniums. I have read about pelargoniums being incorrectly called geraniums by the general public, so this is why I called them that way.

Either way, it is encouraging to hear that it CAN be done in the South - in case we move back, which we probably will, in a year or two top.

When I brought those three geranium (that is, pelargonium) cuttings from Europe, it was end of July in Atlanta; they bloomed soon but not much and the plants were thin and leggy. Not much foliage and modest blooms. But I was still glad I got a flower. T
Then they began getting some kind of spots on them and I knew something was going wrong. Finally, in December my husband drove them cross country to Massachusetts, forgot them in the car overnight somewhere on the way, and the northern winter took care of them in a few hours. Next day he found them frozen. Yey.

Spring came and I was so excited to see that all stores in Massachusetts, even grocery stores, were selling the geranium I had struggled to fly over the ocean and then move cross country in a car.
Final conclusion: what an idiot.
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Old 06-06-2010, 09:35 PM
 
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It use to be very common in the south even with those that tended them their selfs. But that was when most female tended them.Now days with two careers most choose more simple hedges because they do not have time to tend to a garden and the porper care that takes.Also people now days tend to do much more away from the home.But if yuou look the soputh has areas where garden are extensive because of course it year raround almost in most areas with the right plantings.Most of those have their own wells for watering in the south.The rich often have vast gardens in the south as its very popular in large tracts but usually in the rear and fenced for privacy.Also even small garden homes are popular especailly with the retired.Southern living is full of gardening and garden examples.Then of course many araes of Mansions of missippi and Louisana;new orleans charleston;savannah are where the rich europeans with vast homes settled and there are wanderful gardens much like english and french gardens.i alweays love to see the wanderful gardens with the huge live oaks with spanish moss when I visit Louisana.my wifes cousin has a liveoak that is around 450 years old and protected under louisana law as a example.

Last edited by texdav; 06-06-2010 at 09:45 PM..
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