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Old 03-24-2011, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
39,151 posts, read 48,120,470 times
Reputation: 66640

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As I said last year, I was a successful gardener in the NE, but am continually frustrated by failure down south. I,too, yearn to have flowers tumbling from window boxes and abundant pots of flowers around my yard, but nothing much that I'm used to can survive the heat of summer.
I don't give up easily, though. This spring I am planting some perennials which thrive in full sun and don't require much water. I go to sunbaked parking lots to see what is able to thrive on neglect, and then go home and plant it.
So far, Knockout roses are thriving, and I'm about to plant a Meyer Lemon, licorice plants, echinacea, and a butterfly bush.
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Old 03-24-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,760 posts, read 42,398,782 times
Reputation: 9297
The Southern Bulb Co. specializes in hardy heirloom flower bulbs that do well in the south and bloom reliably year after year. Check them out at: Texas Grown Heirloom Flower Bulbs - The Southern Bulb Company

Gardening is a very popular activity here in Central Texas. And there are many resources dedicated to helping people learn about gardening with hardy, drought tolerant, native plants.

City of Austin Grow Green plant guides: http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/growgreen/garden_basics.htm

Central Texas Gardener: http://www.klru.org/ctg/

Flame proof plants: http://mytexasgarden.com/index.php/c...me-like-it-hot

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center http://www.wildflower.org/

Native Plant Information Network: http://www.wildflower.org/explore/

Last edited by CptnRn; 03-24-2011 at 10:44 AM..
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Old 03-24-2011, 12:52 PM
 
1,759 posts, read 1,802,575 times
Reputation: 947
I too love a gorgeous red pot (or many!) of geraniums!
How about a beautiful red/orange lantana? They thrive on sun and heat, and the butterflies and hummingbirds love them.
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Old 03-24-2011, 01:01 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 13,327,361 times
Reputation: 3987
Quote:
Originally Posted by graceangela9 View Post
According to me south people keep them busy in technologies or their area of interest is taste.But north people are mostly nature loving therefore they are much intersted in gardening .
Beats me, how in the world you arrived at that conclusion. Aside from all the flowers, flowering trees, fruit trees, and shrubs, I also have a quarter acre Veggie garden, in these parts this is considered normal.
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 13,327,361 times
Reputation: 3987
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
As I said last year, I was a successful gardener in the NE, but am continually frustrated by failure down south. I,too, yearn to have flowers tumbling from window boxes and abundant pots of flowers around my yard, but nothing much that I'm used to can survive the heat of summer.
I don't give up easily, though. This spring I am planting some perennials which thrive in full sun and don't require much water. I go to sunbaked parking lots to see what is able to thrive on neglect, and then go home and plant it.
So far, Knockout roses are thriving, and I'm about to plant a Meyer Lemon, licorice plants, echinacea, and a butterfly bush.
I don't know where you are but, every fall I trim my butterfly bushes (2) back to about 7 ft tall, in the summer they grow back, at least as tall as the house.
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 13,327,361 times
Reputation: 3987
Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
The Southern Bulb Co. specializes in hardy heirloom flower bulbs that do well in the south and bloom reliably year after year. Check them out at: Texas Grown Heirloom Flower Bulbs - The Southern Bulb Company

Gardening is a very popular activity here in Central Texas. And there are many resources dedicated to helping people learn about gardening with hardy, drought tolerant, native plants.

City of Austin Grow Green plant guides: City of Austin - City of Austin - Grow Green

Central Texas Gardener: Central Texas Gardener

Flame proof plants: Some Like it Hot |

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin

Native Plant Information Network: Native Plant Information Network
Well.....here in N.C. a garden is what we do when it is not BASKETBALL season.
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,360,765 times
Reputation: 6451
LOL Guys I would agree a little with the OP. I don't live in the South, but I think the same non-gardening disease seems to be pretty widespread. At least in Maryland, New York, Florida, Pennsylvania and California LOL of the states I have visited in the US.

In England I think people who are lucky enough to have yards generally garden pretty seriously. Here in the US, even people with pretty large properties don't seem to garden as intensively. Maybe there's a flower patch here and there, or some plantings around the house, but most of the yard is usually a lawn. Even the backyard.

And yes, I am also kind of disappointed with newer developments, too. Maybe the people who moved in couldn't afford plants? But it's not uncommon to see a bunch of new houses in some areas with what looks like 2 or three sticks planted in the front yard and then....well grass.

Also, I didn't read the rest of the posts, but I think veggie gardens are OK (and becoming more popular, right?), but the kind of gardening that seems to be missing is ornamental gardening. I guess it's the American thing to like having a lawn instead of some sort of geometric (or organic) layout of flowers, trees and shrubs in beautiful arrangements around the house.

It also seems that a lot of people in my location tend to think you need a "landscaper" to have a nice garden, or they substitute some sort of "landscaping" for gardening. But my mom has a beautiful back garden and she created it all by herself.

While there are undoubtedly some awesome gardeners in the US (not to mention here on CD), I still contend that with the amount of garden-able land that we have, most Americans (not just the South IMO) still tend to prefer grass-covered lawns or limited foundation plantings.
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,417 posts, read 32,649,897 times
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^^^Let me assure you, the art of ornamental gardening is alive and well in Florida.
One can only surmise that you were in the more urban (read; touristy) areas.
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,360,765 times
Reputation: 6451
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
^^^Let me assure you, the art of ornamental gardening is alive and well in Florida.
One can only surmise that you were in the more urban (read; touristy) areas.
I've been to Florida as a visitor and on home-buying trips. Pretty much all over the state: Miami, Tampa, Places in Northern Florida (I can't remember the names, but there were lots of trailers...not much landscaping. We did go to visit friends who lived in a subdivision. You got me pegged for a vacationer, because we went mainly for the canoeing and the awesome clear springs.), Sanibel Island, Cape Canaveral, Dunedin, Orlando, Key Biscayne, Cape Coral, Ft Lauderdale... Pretty much all over your luscious and beautiful state. Maybe I wasn't in very old residential areas?

Which reminds me you're in Florida. Have you seen the new Salvador Dali Museum? I'm a BIG fan of his, and I visited the Espace Dali in Paris and the US-based museum in Ft. Lauderdale many years ago. Although it was not fancy, I loved it. Dali's a genius. Apparently the new one is more modern and avant garde.

But back on topic, where in Florida can I see residential neighborhoods with gardens?
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,417 posts, read 32,649,897 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
I've been to Florida as a visitor and on home-buying trips. Pretty much all over the state: Miami, Tampa, Places in Northern Florida (I can't remember the names, but there were lots of trailers...not much landscaping. We did go to visit friends who lived in a subdivision. You got me pegged for a vacationer, because we went mainly for the canoeing and the awesome clear springs.), Sanibel Island, Cape Canaveral, Dunedin, Orlando, Key Biscayne, Cape Coral, Ft Lauderdale... Pretty much all over your luscious and beautiful state. Maybe I wasn't in very old residential areas?

Which reminds me you're in Florida. Have you seen the new Salvador Dali Museum? I'm a BIG fan of his, and I visited the Espace Dali in Paris and the US-based museum in Ft. Lauderdale many years ago. Although it was not fancy, I loved it. Dali's a genius. Apparently the new one is more modern and avant garde.

But back on topic, where in Florida can I see residential neighborhoods with gardens?
Yes, I've been to the new Dali , as well as the Ringling estate and its fabulous museum, theres an example of wonderful ornamental gardens.
As far as ornamental gardens, you're right, any older residential community is stuffed full of them, they're all over the state.
I can think of a dozen wonderful examples within a 5 mile radius of me.
Which leads me to ask where you're from, as the idea of ornamental gardens can vary greatly from location to location.
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