U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-24-2011, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,784 posts, read 7,597,804 times
Reputation: 2840

Advertisements

As an African-American of many mixed bloods I found it truly daunting to cross the "slave record" wall while doing my genealogy searches. Lack of info and resources forced me to give up all inquiries and links occurring before 1860. Similar problems with documenting American Indian connections.
I know of my African-Scots-Irish-English-Cherokee-Choctaw-Jewish heritage from family stories, some census records, and views in the mirror.

Last edited by tcrackly; 10-24-2011 at 12:57 PM.. Reason: additions
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-24-2011, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 81,200,468 times
Reputation: 36420
I know that the will of a direct ancestor (confirmed by DNA) left about 20 slaves (I forgot the exact number). He settled in Virginia in about 1740.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2011, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Gone
1,011 posts, read 1,186,957 times
Reputation: 3589
No slaves.... But some of us were maids... And there is a huge love story about marrying over class limits, lol .... Yet they are terrified there was a lesbian, too
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2011, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Republic of New England
633 posts, read 1,508,295 times
Reputation: 194
Well you know what even white people slaved the whites and the blacks slaved the blacks.... it is fact that black did enslaved the whites, as well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2013, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
2 posts, read 1,620 times
Reputation: 18
Default Coming to the Table

Quote:
Originally Posted by STLCardsBlues1989 View Post
Do any of you have ancestors (slaves or slave owners) in your genealogy? Did it surprise you? Shock you? Did it make you feel anything?
You are not alone. Family history research is leading many to confront the historical legacy of slavery. Coming to the Table is an online community where descendants of slaves are coming into relationship with descendants of slave owners.

Suprised to discover another researcher looking into Squire Turner (1793-1871), I emailed a woman who had information. We corresponded for some time before I realized she was African-American, and her family lore had it that she was descended from Turner, a jurist and prominent property rights (pro-slavery) advocate in Kentucky's 1849 Constitutional Convention. As I descend from Turner's father, 'Trading Tom' Turner (1764-1847), I found it disconcerting to consider that I'd come into relationship with a family member who is a person of color. It while I was dealing with my consternation that someone local to me suggested I look into Coming to the Table.

I was fearful of my cousin's judgment; it was my counterpart's whole-hearted acceptance of me into her family that helped me get over false precepts that I was in any way responsible for the slave-rape or breeding program of my ancestors. Over the years, and following a visit to her home in Ohio, my cousin and I have developed a close, personal relationship. With my greater access to resources, we have proved her direct ancestor was owned by Squire when he enlisted in the Union Army.

I've been able to glimpse white privilege, by embracing family members who are so distinctly 'other.' I caught myself blogging that I'd invited her to my family, unconsciously confirming an idea that to do so represented a leg up for my cousin, for example. I no longer recoil in confusion when deeply pigmented colleagues speak of descendency from European noblemen.

Parts of this legacy remain troubling to me. My family has been consistently proud of the tremendous economic achievements by James Monroe Leer (1841-1894), known as 'the most successful breeder of jennets and jacks (mules) in the Mississipi Valley.' Now knowing my slave legacy, I am sure that ancestors propagated their human stock. I've considered the traits they likely bred for: strength, docility and low intelligence come to mind. I find it disturbing that slave masters purposely intruded on the gene pool, and am humbled by the ramifications. I also realize that every generation in my line, subsequent to the most successful slaveholders, left inheritances. Capital and the subsequent social opportunities of wealth - generated by slave labor - remains available to us desendants.

Squire Turner was the primary author in codifying all Kentucky law into a single text in 1850. I find it ironic that the papers of a prolific writer - who had occupied the national stage as a Whig - went missing a hundred years later. It is perhaps due to to shame for Turner's pro-slavery positions that academics failed to preserve them ... as the nation engaged in provision of civil rights for people of color. These papers had the potential to better inform my cousin of her heritage.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2013, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Southern California
393 posts, read 1,424,641 times
Reputation: 522
My Taino and African ancestors were enslaved at some point on Puerto Rico, and I can only assume that they were owned by my Spanish ancestors. Haven't found any written proof yet, but I'm still looking into it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2013, 08:31 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 7,644,207 times
Reputation: 4344
Quote:
Originally Posted by R D Hardesty View Post
You are not alone. Family history research is leading many to confront the historical legacy of slavery. Coming to the Table is an online community where descendants of slaves are coming into relationship with descendants of slave owners.
Interesting site; I just applied and am waiting on confirmation. I'm a descendant of slave holders, but also have a connection to people who worked the Underground Railroad.

I'm not sure what I'm looking for in working with that source; slavery is an ambivalent issue. It's a part of the history of my family lines, but it's not like a time machine exists that would enable me to go back and tell those people "you're going to be an embarrassment to future generations for doing this!" My initial reaction to seeing the slave schedules that are the part of many census renumerations involving ancestors was "oh, they did? Wow. *yech* There are going to be some BIG denials going on in my family when I tell them g-g-g-g-g grandpa Edmund Woodroof held slaves back in Virginny."

If I'm accepted, this may be a very interesting (and possibly uncomfortable) facet of family research.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top