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Human Ancestry: America, football, barbecue, immigrants, house.

 
Old 08-09-2012, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Arizona High Desert
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Oh, I love learning about my ancestors. If any of them were like I am, I'd love to have hung out with them. Just because we are related by genes doesn't mean we have to love them. I got along better with my Aunt better than my own mother. We all carry a store full of ancient memory genes. I think that explains deja vu. My ancestry lines are Scottish, Irish, German, and English. I'm attracted to Gothic stuff, but not modern times so much.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Peggy Anne View Post
Oh, I love learning about my ancestors. If any of them were like I am, I'd love to have hung out with them. Just because we are related by genes doesn't mean we have to love them. I got along better with my Aunt better than my own mother. We all carry a store full of ancient memory genes. I think that explains deja vu. My ancestry lines are Scottish, Irish, German, and English. I'm attracted to Gothic stuff, but not modern times so much.

I know what you mean, about the memory genes. At times I get an odd sense of deja vu when looking at old stuff, museums, etc. Especially old movies, around the '30's, I sometimes get an odd sense that I have been there. Well, that's when my parents grew up, so, perhaps it is a shared memory.
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Old 08-10-2012, 01:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Peggy Anne View Post
Oh, I love learning about my ancestors. If any of them were like I am, I'd love to have hung out with them. Just because we are related by genes doesn't mean we have to love them. ... We all carry a store full of ancient memory genes. I think that explains deja vu.
I also believe in memory genes. If we can inherit someone's nose, why can't we inherit their memories?

I have ancestors I'd have hung out with. All the rascals and scoundrels would be at the top of my list.

Good post!
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Old 08-10-2012, 02:22 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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The First Ward in Binghamton is still very Slovak, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian etc. North side of JC and Southside of Bing are around 40% Irish. Obviously Little Italy in Endicott is still heavily Italian. There are Russian churches, Greek churches, Polish community centers, Sons of Italy lodges, St. Anthony's church is very Italian dominant,
Wow...now I am interested in a side trip to Binhampton! I am going to be passing through on the freeway this fall but now I want to check out these areas....

@@@@

I think importance depends on region and the nationality. Ive noticed here in the Ohio Valley things are very diluted, but up in the Great Lakes area there is still a lot of what the posters said, residual holdovers and holdouts where old immigrant groups mantain a group identity or honor/celebrate their ancestry in various ways...including neighborhoods being intact for generations...
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Old 08-10-2012, 02:31 PM
 
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Some think there may be genetic memory genes, or a collective memory, memories that are encoded into an ethnic or national group over a period of hundreds of years or longer, but you can only inherit someone's memories in sci fi or fantasy.

I notice a lot of people are attracted to the rascals and scoundrels in their ancestry. You know, if you really met them, you probably wouldn't like them, and they'd most likely rob you blind. Robin Hood and dashing rakes with a hidden heart of gold exist in novels.
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Old 08-10-2012, 04:12 PM
 
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If you think of your family history as your people, those who went before, then it is not meaningless. If you have no sense of 'family' history then you may see it as meaningless.

AND even though my ancestors came from Scotland and Northern Ireland Scots in the 1600 and 1700s, we in the Appalachians have maintained some of the culture, language, dialect, music, food, etc that our ancestors brought with them. So the evidence of our ancestry is apparent daily. making it meaningful
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Old 08-11-2012, 08:02 AM
bjh
 
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Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I was born in Western New York, and from what I hear there are still neighborhoods, churches and schools that are predominantly certain ancestries.
That seems to dissipate the further west one goes. Possibly because those heading further west in the 1800s had been born in the US and didn't feel as many ties to the old country. But in the eastern states things remained clique-ish and do to this day in some places.

Further, from what I understand if an outsider moved into one of those eastern neighborhoods, like got a job in the area, there would be some with the attitude of "What are they doing here?" So also some territorial issues going on.
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Old 08-11-2012, 08:27 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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I grew up in an area that was isolated enough that almost everyone had a similar background. They had English, German, and Irish backgrounds. I had always thought that was American. I was an adult before I had ever met a black person to know them enough to know their name. I don't think I have ever met many Italians, Polish, etc. I knew a couple of people from Korea or Japan when neighbors brought them home with them from the war.

We did not as a rule think of or celebrate anything but being American.

I had always thought of myself as being an American with an English background. Upon doing genealogy, I have discovered that we lived mostly as Germans. Our meals were mostly German. Our religion was German, etc. I had to change my way of thinking. Germans were thought to be bad in WWII. I lived around very hard-working, loving, kind people.

Then a cousin from my mother's side married a cousin from my father's side and started doing genealogy. They told us our ancestors go back to the English Royal family. They even went to England to finish the research. Our ancestors go back to the brother of Anne Bolyen, the second wife of Henry VIII. No wonder my mother did not like Catholics. Queen Elizabeth who gave the money to start the first colony in North Carolina was my ancestors niece. Yes, I have deep roots in the settling of America. An ancestor was given a land grant by King George. But I am an American.
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Old 08-11-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by bjh View Post
That seems to dissipate the further west one goes. Possibly because those heading further west in the 1800s had been born in the US and didn't feel as many ties to the old country. But in the eastern states things remained clique-ish and do to this day in some places.

Further, from what I understand if an outsider moved into one of those eastern neighborhoods, like got a job in the area, there would be some with the attitude of "What are they doing here?" So also some territorial issues going on.
I think this is the essense of it. There are people who will stick to the familiar no matter the problems or what else is out there because its familiar, and safe and filled with those who are family or found family. When you read about the forced relocations in Scotland and Ireland, the last to go were these people who hung on until they couldn't. And as many ended up in the Kentucky/WVirgina/Tennessee coordor where most passed through in a generation or so, these were likely the ones that planted themselves and stayed.

Before the far west was the place to go, Iowa/Missouri/Kansas was 'the west'. It's interesting that some of my family (who both sides took very similar roots on mom's side and both ended up in Iowa and are still there) did move on. But in clumps. Not just a few members but a small branch went to California between 1900 and 1910. The ties were not cut, either. I've never been to Iowa, but have to go now that I know its family central, but had friends who's parents moved out later. There is a lot of similarity in background and outlook, even origion though its not ethnically motivated. People even when they wander like to find like.

I think we produce a large number of stay behinds with varying degrees of flexability. A few very firm, most sticking as long as they can. And a smaller number of wanderers who want to see what's over that next horizon. The places settled and recieving the wanderers, especially the far west, are different and not so pinned down precisely because of the people who made the first societys there.

Interestingly, there is a migration out of some areas, especially California, of multi generation natives who don't recognize the place and one of the primary areas to come *to* is the midwest/upper south.

What was so strange to me was on my first trip to Kansas and here in Oklahoma, as a third generation Califonia native, that I felt so *comfortable* and at home. Its like this is the place I remembered, and not what 'home' is now. I see that in a lot of posts. But I guess I have enough wanderer in me that once I set out to leave I was determined, and once I got to my new home, I don't want to leave.

Talk about repeating the journey of your ancestors.
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Old 08-11-2012, 08:42 PM
bjh
 
60,079 posts, read 30,382,128 times
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Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
...What was so strange to me was on my first trip to Kansas and here in Oklahoma, as a third generation Califonia native, that I felt so *comfortable* and at home. Its like this is the place I remembered, and not what 'home' is now. I see that in a lot of posts. But I guess I have enough wanderer in me that once I set out to leave I was determined, and once I got to my new home, I don't want to leave.

Talk about repeating the journey of your ancestors.
I found the same thing about Tennessee, where I feel very at home. After moving up in 2008 I discovered some of my ancestors lived in Memphis as early as the 1870s before moving to DFW in the early 1900s where I grew up. Weird, but in a good way.
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