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Thread summary:

Human Ancestry: America, football, barbecue, immigrants, house.

 
Old 08-18-2012, 03:12 PM
 
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My ancestors included:

-German immigrants from Alsace and Luxembourg
-a German-Swiss marriage on my paternal grandfather's side
-an English family from Nebraska whose daughter married a German farmer from Kansas., my great-grandfather (on my paternal grandmother's side)
-English/Scottish immigrants to Virginia, whose descendants settled in Philadelphia (this is my maternal grandfather's side)
-a Chicago City Attorney and Whig Party orator, who came from said Philadelphia line
-Irish Catholics, especially on my maternal grandmother's side (who was born in Peabody, Massachusetts) but also my great-grandmother on my maternal grandfather's side was from an Irish Catholic family

Overall, my ancestry is a fairly standard mix of Northern and Western Europeans. I don't particularly identify with one ancestry though.
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Old 08-22-2012, 04:41 AM
 
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I don't think my search for my ancestry ever had anything to do with finding a cultural identity. I am glad to be who I am but there is a part of me wants to know how I ended up here. I scarcely knew my grandparents and it seemed almost a history lesson as much as a ancestral search. Some of the things I've learned haven't made me happy, but that is as it is.
I do think a feeling of the past makes one aware of how important it is to move forward.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:45 AM
 
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Back to the OP "Ancestry in America: Meaningless?" does that mean to others/society at large? Well, yes, it's pretty meaningless. To individuals? As in all things, that depends. Personally, my "ancestry" has about 0.0% impact on my daily life, so I really don't care.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:51 AM
 
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If ancestry was meaningless in the US, then why does Ancestry.com have have over 2 million subscribers and over 38 million family trees? I guess none of them are Americans except me? Many Americans find ancestry & family history immensely meaningful.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:46 AM
 
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I did not say that the discussions & amature sleuthing were not very popular in many parts of the country, just that based on the OP, my view, based on business & travel in other parts of the world, is that in comparison Americans, unlike some in other parts of the world, tend not to bring their specific ancestry into most aspects of their lives.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:58 AM
 
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But keep in mind that the OP decided to post this question in a forum populated mostly by people who are actively engaged in ancestry research. So to propose that it's "meaningless" here is almost tryign to set up an argument. then the thread got into people's ideas about how their national origins affect them today.

But I think most of us read the initial post and concluded that by "ancestry" the OP meant "family history" and not "the nationalities of our distant ancestors." The former is very, very important to many of us. The latter, maybe not so much.
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Old 08-22-2012, 10:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
But keep in mind that the OP decided to post this question in a forum populated mostly by people who are actively engaged in ancestry research. So to propose that it's "meaningless" here is almost tryign to set up an argument. then the thread got into people's ideas about how their national origins affect them today.

But I think most of us read the initial post and concluded that by "ancestry" the OP meant "family history" and not "the nationalities of our distant ancestors." The former is very, very important to many of us. The latter, maybe not so much.
Excellent points & well taken.
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayess1 View Post
I did not say that the discussions & amature sleuthing were not very popular in many parts of the country,
I never thought that about interest in genealogy skewing geographically but it's an interesting question. Perhaps it's less popular in places with a high proportion of transplants? Or where there are fewer older people?
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Old 09-04-2012, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Where the heart is...
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Default I have seen it most in the Greek community...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Maybe it's different where you live. I live in Chicago, and most of my friends are very aware of what ancestry they are, and everyone they know knows who they are as well. I'm Swedish, and I grew up in a family that very much embrased that heritage. I have a few friends who are Polish and a few that are Italian, and they also talk about it and totally associate with their past. The Irish in Chicago are also extremely proud of their heritage.

Same with the Greeks, but I see it most in the Polish and Italians in Chicago.
The Greeks in Chicago (as well as other areas of the U.S.) embrace and celebrate their Greek culture and Eastern Orthodox religion. They raise their children in the culture and time honored traditions of their particular regional area where they come from. They name their children after their parents and they baptize them into the Greek Orthodox faith. Because education is VERY important to the people of Hellas they typically send their children to Greek classes to formally learn the Greek language although the parents LEARN AND SPEAK English, as do their children, they insist that the children learn to read, write, and speak proper Greek. They also learn Greek customs and traditions, culture (traditional Greek dances as well as recitations of poetry and singing of songs) and the rich and glorious history of Greece.

The parents will then attend performances where the children dress in traditional Greek costumes and showcase everything they have learned during the school year. This school year runs in tangent with the school year of the community they live in and the children usually attend two nights a week (sometimes three) and are expected to do homework as well.

The immigrnats from Greece do not expect the school system or the local government to provide them with translators to interpret either in speech or in writing what is going on in their home communities, business communities or schools. They are proud to be Americans and assimilate graciously to the American way of life in word and deed, as well as maintaining their proud Greek culture and traditions at no cost in any manner to their new homeland.
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Old 09-05-2012, 04:46 AM
bjh
 
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"Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it."

Know yourself and where your people came from, genealogy or not, and you'll understand the world a great deal better.
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