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Old 07-27-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: out standing in my field
1,033 posts, read 1,572,302 times
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No benefits unless you meet tribal enrollment requirements and to my knowledge NO tribe accepts DNA results, as DNA results cannot specify a tribe. To enroll as Cherokee you need a bombproof paper trail of birth certificates back to an ancestor who was counted on the Dawes enrollment.
No federally recognized tribe will enroll a mixed blood candidate on the basis of grandpa's say-so or other family myth.

My wife has a 4/4 blood quantum certificate, she's full blooded Hopi Indian and is enrolled in her tribe. We ran her DNA on a lark, I told her "I bet we can find a Spaniard in the woodpile", which she didn't believe. Sure enough, she tested 0.17% Iberian and the rest native American. She's more Spanish than you are indian by a factor of 2. I wonder why it hasn't occurred to her to apply for Spanish citizenship?? She is descended on one side from a village that was occupied in the early 1700s by the Spanish and ultimately destroyed by nearby Hopi villages to drive the Spanish out. These Spanish soldiers didn't bring any women with them, so....
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Old 07-27-2017, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 539,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaparrito View Post
No benefits unless you meet tribal enrollment requirements and to my knowledge NO tribe accepts DNA results, as DNA results cannot specify a tribe. To enroll as Cherokee you need a bombproof paper trail of birth certificates back to an ancestor who was counted on the Dawes enrollment.
No federally recognized tribe will enroll a mixed blood candidate on the basis of grandpa's say-so or other family myth.

My wife has a 4/4 blood quantum certificate, she's full blooded Hopi Indian and is enrolled in her tribe. We ran her DNA on a lark, I told her "I bet we can find a Spaniard in the woodpile", which she didn't believe. Sure enough, she tested 0.17% Iberian and the rest native American. She's more Spanish than you are indian by a factor of 2. I wonder why it hasn't occurred to her to apply for Spanish citizenship?? She is descended on one side from a village that was occupied in the early 1700s by the Spanish and ultimately destroyed by nearby Hopi villages to drive the Spanish out. These Spanish soldiers didn't bring any women with them, so....
The Spaniards created families with the Native Americans, while the British didn't
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Old 08-01-2017, 11:27 PM
 
Location: TX
3,952 posts, read 4,867,116 times
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Not entirely true. A number of British men had children with Native American women...some even settled down with them. But yeah, it was definitely not accepted by the other British people!
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Old 08-02-2017, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 539,735 times
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Originally Posted by Lee W. View Post
Not entirely true. A number of British men had children with Native American women...some even settled down with them. But yeah, it was definitely not accepted by the other British people!
The Trail of Tears and the Sand Creek Massacre, tells me otherwise...
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Old 08-02-2017, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,974 posts, read 5,456,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawnbeth View Post
I have my 23and me data results, It shows broadley european, no surprise, and .08 native american, gramps told me this was cherokee. What year would this make my native american relatives, I am quite sure this is too low to get schooling benefits correct?
There seems to be confusion over your use of .08. Are you 0.08 native American out of 1.00, i.e. 8%? Or are you 0.08%? Or is it 0.08%, i.e. 8 parts in 10,000, 8/10000?

--------
Taking a step back.

The key formula for the ancestral tree is 2^n where n=number of generations from you
Start with n=0

2^0 = 1 That is you! You are your generation.
2^1 = 2 Your parents, one generation away from you
2^2= 4 Your grandparents, two generations away from you.
2^3 = 8 Your great-grandparents, two generations away from you.

Now for percentages, you take the inverse of 2^n or 1/2^n.

Example #1: three of your grandparents are 100% pure Japanese and one is 100% pure Native Australian.

Then you are 1/2^n --> 1/2^2 = 1/4 ==.25 == 25% Native Australian
Also you are 3/2^n --> 3/2^2 = 3/4 ==.75 == 75% Japanese
_____
As to schooling benefits, the responses you are likely getting is based on your self-defined identity. Do you identify with being Native American? Has that identity shaped your life? If the answer to both is "yes," then checking the box has a rationale.

At the same time, universities are desperate for representation. So behind closed doors they are likely to encourage anyone with 1/32 or 1/64 blood and almost no identification to check the box.

The problem is there is a conflict between the intent and the convenience to the school. If you check the box , then your name goes on a list for student groups. If you have less than 1/32 or less and without any affinity to Native culture, then your strategic play may back fire socially or worse.

As you can see, the self-identification approach is problematic.

I write this as a person of 7-15% of Native Blood via DNA testing, but it is a recent understanding and I did not grow up self-identifying as Native. Were I apply today, I could not morally or ethically check the box. Say I did a ton more ancestral research and I got in touch with those roots and those roots became a big part of my identity, I would check the box with great pride. Today? I feel i would be exploiting the situation and taking the place of another.

S.
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Old 08-02-2017, 11:59 AM
 
341 posts, read 254,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawnbeth View Post
I have my 23and me data results, It shows broadley european, no surprise, and .08 native american, gramps told me this was cherokee. What year would this make my native american relatives, I am quite sure this is too low to get schooling benefits correct?
School benefits and scholarships for Native Americans have high standards. As someone else mentioned, you have to either meet a blood quantum or be enrolled in a Federally recognized tribe- or both. Some tribes will not enroll you as a member unless you meet their blood quantum requirements. The whole thing can be quite tricky. My daughter has my Osage blood and also her Dad's Muskogee Creek blood. She meets the requirements for both however, MC does not allow dual enrollment so she is enrolled in the Osage tribe.

For the poster who asked about NA adoption, you might want to look up the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). If you are looking to adopt a native child, your agency should have information regarding this.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:37 PM
 
9,063 posts, read 3,340,676 times
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Originally Posted by Sarahsez View Post
Another thing related to this something I've seen is with the adoptions. IMO, you lose choices with your children. I lived in Oklahoma for a while. It appeared that kids with NA ancestry were only allowed to be adopted by those with NA ancestry. If something happened to me that would affect my children, I'm not sure I would want that to be the route taken. It appeared kids were sometimes not placed with relatives over non relatives because the relatives on the other side of the family were not Native American. I may be wrong on that, but it was the impression I had. I know there were some kids in the system who couldn't be adopted outside of the various tribes, but I'm not sure if it mattered which tribe.

If a child is born with NA blood, or one of the parents have NA blood, legally, the tribe powers that be are supposed to be notified. They won't necessarily stop the adoption, but they WILL look to see if there are relatives or other NA willing to adopt.


It stems from back in the day, when NA children were taken away from, and kidnapped from NA parents, under the mistaken notion that heathens shouldn't be raising children.


A few years ago, there was a case where a woman wanted to give her child up for adoption, and the father who was part NA contested it, as he wanted to raise the child. The case dragged on for a long time, and the child was living with the adoptive parents the whole time...even though, the whole time, the father wanted custody. It was a mess. I don't remember how it ultimately turned out, but I remember the adoptive family making a huge stink when the child (who was like 3 or 4 at the time) was given to the father.
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:39 PM
 
3,990 posts, read 3,476,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
If a child is born with NA blood, or one of the parents have NA blood, legally, the tribe powers that be are supposed to be notified. They won't necessarily stop the adoption, but they WILL look to see if there are relatives or other NA willing to adopt.


It stems from back in the day, when NA children were taken away from, and kidnapped from NA parents, under the mistaken notion that heathens shouldn't be raising children.


A few years ago, there was a case where a woman wanted to give her child up for adoption, and the father who was part NA contested it, as he wanted to raise the child. The case dragged on for a long time, and the child was living with the adoptive parents the whole time...even though, the whole time, the father wanted custody. It was a mess. I don't remember how it ultimately turned out, but I remember the adoptive family making a huge stink when the child (who was like 3 or 4 at the time) was given to the father.
I think I know what case you are talking about. The father originally wanted nothing to do with the child. For some reason, I don't think the tribe really wanted to be involved. The father eventually gave the little girl back to the adoptive parents.
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Old 08-04-2017, 05:35 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,638 posts, read 22,581,050 times
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Baby Veronica Brown.
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Old 08-04-2017, 06:09 AM
 
Location: CA--> NEK VT--> Pitt Co, NC
379 posts, read 314,044 times
Reputation: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee W. View Post
Not entirely true. A number of British men had children with Native American women...some even settled down with them. But yeah, it was definitely not accepted by the other British people!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarknation View Post
The Trail of Tears and the Sand Creek Massacre, tells me otherwise...
There are, of course, always exceptions. The British tended to not prefer any kind of mixing but colonial america is filled with colony marriages or bondings or common law marriages of Brits and POCs. It happened. It didn't become outlawed in most places for another good 100 years, and even then, all one did was move out into the frontier where there were no nosy busy bodies meddling in your affairs.

Smoky Mountain Kin is a website involving the cousin branches of my mom's dad's family and there is all kinds of stuff posted there about the native american marriages/alliances made in that part of the family. They are cousins so, alas, we don't get to claim any NA heritage (and our DNA tests proved that as well), but some of those cousin descendants were keen on proving their ancestry...and they did.

That being said...this is one of the biggest familial lies ever told in America (the next biggest is that we descend from kings/queens...SMH), but everyone has to figure this out on their own. Sometimes they luck out and it is true, but most times, it was just wishful thinking...or people not grasping that their French Mediterranean grandmother from La Cote d'Azur tans really well not because she was part native, but because of the long standing mixing of Mediterranean peoples...including Africans. :-D
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