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Old 07-25-2017, 09:28 AM
 
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In my own family, most of my emotions are with rather recent relatives.

My paternal grandmother died when she was only 35. My dad and his sisters were aged 6-19 when their mom died and her death had a huge effect on their lives. They still are coming to grips with her death back in the early 1970s. I wish I would have gotten to know her.

I have a cousin who is over 100 years old who is still alive. I found an article about how she was driving in the 1960s and a child rode a bike out in front of her car. The child was killed and my cousin passed out in grief at the scene according to the newspaper. She was not charged but that story made me sad for my cousin. I 'd never bring it up to her today. I can't imaging killing a child. It is like the stuff of nightmares to me.
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Old 07-25-2017, 09:34 AM
 
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Reading about the measures my great great great grandmother took to protect her younger sons from union soldiers and pin Cherokee, during the civil war, and after. She died for the effort, in a prison, from pneumonia. She was only 42.


It made me sad, but it also made me proud, that THIS is the stock I come from. She was brave and smart and she kept her kids safe to the best of her ability.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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My father (and for that matter, my mother) are both from Taiwan. I was born and grew up in the US. A couple of years ago I started to research my father's side of the family more and their genealogy. I knew my father's biological mother died when he was 2 or 3 years old. So, my father was mostly raised by his grandmother (or my great grandmother). My paternal grandfather remarried my biological grandother's younger sister and they had 3 more kids. I knew very little about my biological grandmother and never knew what she looked like. Then, about 5 years ago my step grandmother passed away at age 104. So my father went back to Taiwan to attend her funeral. When he came back to the US, he came back with a black and white photo of a younger looking lady. I asked my father who that lady was and he told me that was his biological mother. When I looked closer it was shocking that I actually bear a resemblance to her. Oddly, it was emotional seeing that. And while doing more research about my paternal grandmother (I got the information through relatives including my uncle and cousin), that my paternal grandmother had 4 younger siblings (3 sisters and 1 brother)- her 2 youngest sisters were given up for adoption. I heard in those days in many parts of East Asia that was common. But, the good thing was that both my biological grandmother and step grandmother kept in touch with their younger sisters.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:40 AM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
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My wife became thoroughly smitten with her 3-great grandfather when we discovered that, in 1825 in eastern Kentucky, he became a Methodist minister and received a court order manumitting his slaves and giving them the last name of his mother. Within a couple of years, the family and all of the former slaves left in a wagon train for Edgar County, Illinois where they all settled. Subsequent censuses identified the former slaves as free people of color.
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Old 07-25-2017, 05:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Did your mother resent you growing up? Did you wish you were put for adoption? I can relate.

Resentment would be an understatement, & yes, I wished I had been placed for adoption.
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Old 07-27-2017, 12:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twnxn View Post
My father (and for that matter, my mother) are both from Taiwan. I was born and grew up in the US. A couple of years ago I started to research my father's side of the family more and their genealogy. I knew my father's biological mother died when he was 2 or 3 years old. So, my father was mostly raised by his grandmother (or my great grandmother). My paternal grandfather remarried my biological grandother's younger sister and they had 3 more kids. I knew very little about my biological grandmother and never knew what she looked like. Then, about 5 years ago my step grandmother passed away at age 104. So my father went back to Taiwan to attend her funeral. When he came back to the US, he came back with a black and white photo of a younger looking lady. I asked my father who that lady was and he told me that was his biological mother. When I looked closer it was shocking that I actually bear a resemblance to her. Oddly, it was emotional seeing that. And while doing more research about my paternal grandmother (I got the information through relatives including my uncle and cousin), that my paternal grandmother had 4 younger siblings (3 sisters and 1 brother)- her 2 youngest sisters were given up for adoption. I heard in those days in many parts of East Asia that was common. But, the good thing was that both my biological grandmother and step grandmother kept in touch with their younger sisters.


This kind of reminds me of the premise of The Joy Luck Club.
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Old 08-20-2017, 09:13 AM
 
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I was upset to learn my great great great great grandfather was killed in Germany
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Old 08-20-2017, 01:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiminnm View Post
My wife became thoroughly smitten with her 3-great grandfather when we discovered that, in 1825 in eastern Kentucky, he became a Methodist minister and received a court order manumitting his slaves and giving them the last name of his mother. Within a couple of years, the family and all of the former slaves left in a wagon train for Edgar County, Illinois where they all settled. Subsequent censuses identified the former slaves as free people of color.
I had to look up what "manumitting" meant. Apparently, someone in my line had to do the same. He may have originally been a Baptist preacher who became a Methodist preacher. Apparently, my guy was a fanatic and later had his license as 'exhorter' revoked when he threatened to kill a man.
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Old 08-21-2017, 06:59 AM
 
Location: CA--> NEK VT--> Pitt Co, NC
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Not sure how emotional I get, but the story that pulls me in the most is the mysterious death of my great grandfather.

Newspapers originally claimed his death was a murder. It says police investigated it as such. There were indications that he was being chased and he either ran or was pushed in front of a train.

Then a few days later, the papers said it was a suicide, but explained nothing further, not even to deny previous eyewitness accounts. Just a couple of sentences that the investigation would stop and the funeral would happen on x day.

No one ever talked about him within the family so I have no idea which to believe. I would love to find out if there are any police notes extant on the "investigation."

I'd also really love to know whether or not he really had any issues that would prompt him to take his life. He had a child who died at child birth years before (a twin that didn't make it), but otherwise, the story is anyway, that nothing else eventful happened.

His death, however, left a gaping hole in that family which rippled through the next 2 generations. My great grandmother kind of withdrew and needed the help of her family to raise her two sons until one of them (my grandfather) got sick and needed her constant attention pretty much into his adulthood, to the exclusion of the older son. Man...the rift that caused. SMH.

I guess it just would be nice to know why the damage had to happen at all.
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Old 09-14-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: NC
4,534 posts, read 7,532,471 times
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The first was reading a book online that mentioned my grandfather being shot by a sniper during crossfire between the IRA and Brit troops (black and tans). He was on his way home from work - the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast (makers of the Titanic). He lingered in hospital for a few days and then died, leaving behind a young family. His wife died two years later. My dad was orphaned at age 3.


The most recent was when I stumbled across some archives with links to slave narratives. I was fascinated. I stayed up very late reading them. It broke my heart to read about how families were broken up, and how demeaned many slaves were. Their experience simply cannot be explained here in a few words. Yet, reading their stories, I could sense the beautiful and forgiving spirit of some of the women and men in their narrative. I think they must be beyond proud to be looking down to see what their families have achieved because of their sacrifices. I also read that some were treated very well by their owners, they went to church together, their owner built a school for them. it was so weird to understand that they had no problem with how their lives had been. Slavery in reprehensible and inhumane, yet for them, and their owners, it was what it was, some did not question it. I am glad I took the time to learn about this. I now see that the issue was far more complex than I ever imagined. And, being a Brit, I thought this was an American issue, America's shame. Life has a way of showing that there is no reason to feel cocky! I learned that Britain was as culpable. My own ancestors used to travel to Virginia to buy American cotton. Other of my ancestors worked in the cotton mills in England in pretty harsh conditions. Life almost came full circle.
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