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Old 08-03-2017, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,464,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alandros View Post
The Y DNA haplogroup gets assigned via the Y DNA results... which means it's only a single ancestral line. There are no autosomal haplogroups, you get percentages for that since it represents multiple lines.

The Y DNA haplogroup only represents the ancestor of that paternal line.
I hereby assign this project to you.

You are the real MVP.
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Old 08-03-2017, 10:47 PM
 
Location: CA--> NEK VT--> Pitt Co, NC
379 posts, read 313,497 times
Reputation: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
It doesn't. I am unsure why you feel that way. He has autosomal info to consider.

I think that for a basic DNA test, you are overthinking this. Again, do you understand haplogroups? Is there something missing or misunderstood in your test ?

Haplogroups are passed down, unbroken and unchanged. Never, ever changes. Look to your autosomal info, outside of special circumstances.
Ok. Well first off, 23 & Me has mixed up tests and had other errors, so while I get it that the DNA doesn't change, the people working it do. Not that I really believe they mixed his test with anyone else's...just saying...there is an inherent margin of error.

Secondly, we all know the autosomal DNA tests only go back 10-12 generations so it in itself can't provide a complete picture of the haplogroup. It can only give you what is available within the inherent limitations of the test.

Sure. My dad's male progenitor could be Greystoke, but color me skeptical (understandably).
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Old 08-03-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,464,880 times
Reputation: 5596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alandros View Post
The Y DNA haplogroup gets assigned via the Y DNA results... which means it's only a single ancestral line. There are no autosomal haplogroups, you get percentages for that since it represents multiple lines.

The Y DNA haplogroup only represents the ancestor of that paternal line.
LOL, maybe I can take this one over.

You STILL have autosomal DNA. Your dad's line could be one thing. But you have a mom, too. And she has a mom and father.


To explain haplogroups. Your mom could be A on her maternal line and B on her father's line. Your dad is C on his maternal line and D on his paternal line. You are a male child to A mother and D father. You get your mom's A and your dad's D. This is haplogroups.

Your mom checked your dad's mom at the door. No C for you. And no B for you paternally.

This is a very western manner of explaining DNA haplogroups but true. Your people are still your people.
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Old 08-03-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
8,138 posts, read 4,444,408 times
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Your dad's paternal line can be 80% SSA going back 6 or 8 generations or more but at some point there is a European male. All of his downstream male descendants will carry that ancestor's Y haplogroup. There's no mystery to it...that's how it works. That is such a tiny and limited piece of the DNA picture that it essentially is a novelty. People latch on to it as if it was the key to their ancestry. It simply points to some primitive group of guys sitting around a campfire several thousand years ago. Somebody sitting there had a slight accidental mutation that was carried forward. Maybe that was in Asia or Europe or Africa.

You have only two haplogroups, one from your direct paternal line and one from your direct maternal line. Your mom's dad's Y haplogroup was not passed on to you or your siblings but it would be in your mom's brother's DNA and any of his direct male descendants. You got some of his autosomal DNA -- maybe 25% -- but not his Y haplogroup. You might test male cousins if you have the continued interest.
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Old 08-03-2017, 10:57 PM
 
877 posts, read 892,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naadarien View Post
Ok. Well first off, 23 & Me has mixed up tests and had other errors, so while I get it that the DNA doesn't change, the people working it do. Not that I really believe they mixed his test with anyone else's...just saying...there is an inherent margin of error.

Secondly, we all know the autosomal DNA tests only go back 10-12 generations so it in itself can't provide a complete picture of the haplogroup. It can only give you what is available within the inherent limitations of the test.

Sure. My dad's male progenitor could be Greystoke, but color me skeptical (understandably).
So autosomal DNA doesn't have haplogroups, they summarize the results there by assigned ethnic percentages.

Haplogroups are simply the way they summarize what Y DNA, paternal only DNA, matches in relation to the rest of the world. Since it only represents one line they don't do percentages, they do designations. Also because of the limitations you point out regarding autosomal DNA since it is a mixed bag of all your DNA it can't tell you too much detail further back except rough ethnic groups you likely match. Y DNA can match any other male around the world at some level, whether 200 years ago or 10,000 years ago.

Because your dad was assigned to Haplogroup L-21 that only applies to his paternal Y DNA, it does not apply to the autosomal DNA results. That means that paternally you and he descend from a European male, L21 being the "Atlantic Celtic" haplgroup, the most common in Ireland, Scotland, and England... but found at lower levels outside of it such as France or Germany.

So again L21 only applies to the Y DNA, no other part of the DNA and it is not a summary for all your DNA results.
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Old 08-03-2017, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,464,880 times
Reputation: 5596
Quote:
Originally Posted by naadarien View Post
Ok. Well first off, 23 & Me has mixed up tests and had other errors, so while I get it that the DNA doesn't change, the people working it do. Not that I really believe they mixed his test with anyone else's...just saying...there is an inherent margin of error.

Secondly, we all know the autosomal DNA tests only go back 10-12 generations so it in itself can't provide a complete picture of the haplogroup. It can only give you what is available within the inherent limitations of the test.

Sure. My dad's male progenitor could be Greystoke, but color me skeptical (understandably).
What, exactly, is your argument and source of irritation?

You share a common ancestor with someone, as a male, with each of your haplogroups.

This isn't hard.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:02 PM
 
Location: CA--> NEK VT--> Pitt Co, NC
379 posts, read 313,497 times
Reputation: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
LOL, maybe I can take this one over.

You STILL have autosomal DNA. Your dad's line could be one thing. But you have a mom, too. And she has a mom and father.


To explain haplogroups. Your mom could be A on her maternal line and B on her father's line. Your dad is C on his maternal line and D on his paternal line. You are a male child to A mother and D father. You get your mom's A and your dad's D. This is haplogroups.

Your mom checked your dad's mom at the door. No C for you. And no B for you paternally.

This is a very western manner of explaining DNA haplogroups but true. Your people are still your people.
I am asking about my dad's results, not mine.

So only the B...and whatever SNPs that make up the y-DNA of that B.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,464,880 times
Reputation: 5596
Quote:
Originally Posted by naadarien View Post
I am asking about my dad's results, not mine.

So only the B...and whatever SNPs that make up the y-DNA of that B.
The rule doesn't change.

Even if your dad is adopted and such. His haplogroup IS his haplogroup. And your haplogroup.

And regardless as if you are male of female, this is YOUR paternal haplogroup UNLESS you are also adopted or the child of another man.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:11 PM
 
Location: CA--> NEK VT--> Pitt Co, NC
379 posts, read 313,497 times
Reputation: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
What, exactly, is your argument and source of irritation?

You share a common ancestor with someone, as a male, with each of your haplogroups.

This isn't hard.
Right. So in 12 generations, we have 2048 xG-granparents. Half of those are male. 1024. Only half of those are his father's males. 512.

410 (80%) of those are from sub-saharan africa

102 (ish) of those are from europe.

How come the latter group mattered more? Why did their haplogroup supersede the former group?



Not hard at all...and still no one has answered how it worked out that way.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:12 PM
 
Location: CA--> NEK VT--> Pitt Co, NC
379 posts, read 313,497 times
Reputation: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
The rules doesn't change.

Even if your dad is adopted and such. His haplogroup IS his haplogroup.

And regardless as if you are male of female, this is YOUR paternal haplogroup UNLESS you are also adopted or the child of another man.
Cool. So how is that haplogroup determined?
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