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Old 08-20-2017, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
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Originally Posted by AFP View Post
I agree but in addition there is a Caucasus/Iranian component.
See: https://www.nature.com/news/farming-...eveals-1.20119

Quote:
Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran.
Quote:
The team found stark differences between the genomes of Neolithic individuals from the southern Levant region, including Israel and Jordan, and those living across the Zagros Mountains in western Iran. The Zagros early farmers were instead more closely related to nearby hunter-gatherers who lived in the region before the Neolithic.

This pattern of ancestry adds to the evidence that the hunter-gatherers in the southern Levant and Iran independently developed farming, says Roger Matthews, an archaeologist at the University of Reading, UK, who co-directs the Central Zagros Archaeological Project in Iran.

Quote:
The Zagros farmers domesticated goats as well as cereals such as emmer, whereas their counterparts to the west had their own crops, including barley and wheat. Around 9,500 years ago, these traditions began spreading around the Middle East, Rogers says, noting that the two populations of farmers may have mixed in eastern Turkey while seeking out sources of obsidian, which was useful for making tools. By the time farmers in present-day Turkey began migrating to Europe, they carried a 'Neolithic toolkit' that included crops, animals and tools from both farming traditions.
That could explain the Caucasus/Iranian component in the Minoan genomes. My guess would be that the Levant farmers made up the majority and the Iranian farmers made up the minority of the genetic heritage of farmers migrating into Europe, and that the mix was non-uniform, helping to explain why the Mycenaeans apparently lacked the Caucacus/Iranian component.
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Old 09-26-2017, 10:46 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
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My Big Y results came in I share the most Novel Variants 13 to be exact with a man from Chania, Crete and a man whose paternal line leads from Mount Sumac?, Syria. In addition I also share the most SNP's 26,688 with the man from Crete.
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Old 09-28-2017, 01:38 PM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
7,238 posts, read 4,702,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
My Big Y results came in I share the most Novel Variants 13 to be exact with a man from Chania, Crete and a man whose paternal line leads from Mount Sumac?, Syria. In addition I also share the most SNP's 26,688 with the man from Crete.
He is Druze which has been a closed society for about 1,000 years. One has to be born in that group to be part of it.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
7,172 posts, read 5,605,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyDonkey View Post
See: https://www.nature.com/news/farming-...eveals-1.20119

That could explain the Caucasus/Iranian component in the Minoan genomes. My guess would be that the Levant farmers made up the majority and the Iranian farmers made up the minority of the genetic heritage of farmers migrating into Europe, and that the mix was non-uniform, helping to explain why the Mycenaeans apparently lacked the Caucacus/Iranian component.
By "Mycenaeans" I mean the sub-population of "Pelasgian" farmers that predated the proto-Greek Indo-European influx that became the overlaying ruling class.
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