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Old 08-14-2017, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,473,019 times
Reputation: 5596

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Quote:
Originally Posted by abcdefg567 View Post
Various calculators and other websites not, "tuned," for Jewish DNA typically think that our Ashkenazi portion is from West Asian, the Middle East, or Mediterranean. Or some combination of various regions. I'm not so sure that they are genetically European. Classically Caucasian, yes, but maybe not quite European.

My Dad's paternal haplogroup is J1E which many Arabic and Ashkenazi Jewish men have. Based on appearance of my ancestor and others, I'd really guess that many were more Middle Eastern rather than Europe.

Although I guess no one quite knows for sure!
I was going to mention haplogroups but that doesn't go over well in this forum. 23andMe doesn't go over well in general...


Anything telling me 50% plus on a calculator can get my attention.
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:47 PM
 
2,132 posts, read 1,165,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
I'm 44% 'European Jewish' and the balance is Great Britain, Ireland and Western Europe. This makes perfect sense as my father was Jewish and I knew that my Great Grandparents had left Lithuania (which was part of Russia then) around 1880. My mother was English and I have traced her family back to around 1700 in the Midlands and the North of England.

Between 1860 and 1910 round three million jews fled persecution in Eastern Europe, mainly the Russian Empire. Most went to the USA and around 20% ended up in Western Europe. European Jews can be defined as an ethnicity due to the extent of inter-marriage and inter-breeding*.

With 50% European Jewish, chances are that one of your parents is Jewish.

* Watch out for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and heart disease.
Also consider being tested for the Tay-Sachs gene.
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Old 08-15-2017, 01:40 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,516 posts, read 30,220,413 times
Reputation: 31693
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
I was going to mention haplogroups but that doesn't go over well in this forum. 23andMe doesn't go over well in general...


Anything telling me 50% plus on a calculator can get my attention.
How do haplogroups not "go over well" here? It has been difficult to explain to some people what information can and cannot be gained from them. Haplogroups tell about deep genetic history; they are not very useful in isolation in helping to identify near relatives. People can have the same haplotype and not be close relatives at all. With regard to Y-DNA, closely related men will have the same haplotype.

I have tested with 23AndMe and transferred my results to Family Tree DNA. I have spent several days looking at trees there and contacting matches to ask them if they have trees elsewhere. I have been able to confirm some really distant connections because my match and I have extensive trees. My matches at 23AndMe still have a very disappointing response rate. If you are interested in genealogy - and this is a genealogy forum - you will get more data from FTDNA than 23AndMe. I have not tested with Ancestry.com and do not have a tree there. I do have one at GEDmatch.

Anyone hoping to find close relatives should have autosomal testing. Men should also do Y-DNA with FTDNA. The autosomal testing can find matches from parents to siblings to cousins and aunts and uncles - if they have also tested. Y-DNA can perhaps find a man's father's surname. In the OP's situation, if his Jewish ancestry is paternal, his Y-DNA might find a Jewish surname.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,092 posts, read 6,382,772 times
Reputation: 9923
Your Jewish ancestors could have come from Spain by way of Italy and had Ashkenazi blood. A neighbor had a VERY Italian family but her research showed they were Jewish, in part. The rest of her family angrily rejected that hypothesis. This was long before DNA analysis.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor..._Jews_in_Spain

Q: What's the difference between a horoscope and a DNA analysis?
A: A horoscope is free.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,252 posts, read 17,336,615 times
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You say that you do not know your parents. Why is that? If you are adopted many states will now open adoption records for adults.

Let me guess that you are adopted. Your birth certificate will still give you the date and place of your birth. Assuming you want to explore your Ashkenazi heritage I would contact Synagogues in the metro area where you were born. Ask the Rabbi if s/he can help you find your birth parent. They may know of an 'untimely' pregnancy among their congregation families and reach out to them to see if there is a match. Also, there may be newspapers and magazines targeting the Ashkenazi where you could publish your desire to contact your birth parents, include the date and place of your birth.
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Old 08-15-2017, 08:58 PM
 
3,496 posts, read 5,156,728 times
Reputation: 5206
It means one of your parents has 100% European Jewish ancestry. Ashkenazi Jews are genetically distinct from other Jewish populations including Israeli Jews who would usually be "Middle Eastern" in a DNA test. If you are male, look at your X chromosome which came from your mother. If it is labeled "Ashkenazi" then you know your mother was Jewish. If it is non-Ashkenazi European, then it is likely your father was Jewish and not your mother. 23andMe is the only test that uses the X chromosome in their ethnicity calculation.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:24 PM
 
5,035 posts, read 4,358,148 times
Reputation: 14527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
I did a 23andme test last year and do not know my parents. Long story short is that my results show me as 50% Jewish and the other 50% European (mix of east/west/south/north). It said that a parent or grandparent most likely was Jewish (it said 1-2 generations), while the other 50% European show origins of like 6+ generations. Googling showed me this particular Jewish variant (Ashk.) are Jewish people who eventually settled in Eastern Europe.

I'm just a bit confused by the whole thing. I've done some research since getting the results but I'm having a hard time figuring out exactly what this means. I read how this particular group keeps to themselves and that's how DNA tests like this are able to identify me as 50% Jewish.

I'm just confused how all my DNA is seemingly European yet 50% of it is somehow European and Jewish. Does this mean if I go back far enough my ancestors on the 50% Jewish side all came from the Israel region? Just trying to soak this all in and find out what it means/where I'm from.

Thank you all in advance!
You're half Ashkenazi Jewish (a distinct ethnic group), according to the test. That means that your chromosomes carry markers that identify you as likely having had one parent that was Ashkenazi Jewish. Ashkenazi Jews are Jews who settled in Central and Eastern Europe many generations ago, as opposed to Sephardic Jews, who were expelled from the Iberian peninsula over 500 years ago, or Arab Jews who lived in the Arab world, or Persian Jews, or Ethiopian Jews, or other Jewish populations from other areas of the world.

Most Ashkenazi Jews in the US have forbears who immigrated to the US in the late 19th and early 20th century. So your parent was likely US born, probably the grandparents, too. Most likely scenario is that one parent was Ashkenazi Jewish, and the other parent was the child of non-Jewish European immigrants.

I'm assuming that you are adopted, and are trying to learn more about your biological background. I'm curious, did the test reveal any possible relatives, who might be able to give you more personal information about your background?
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,473,019 times
Reputation: 5596
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
How do haplogroups not "go over well" here? It has been difficult to explain to some people what information can and cannot be gained from them. Haplogroups tell about deep genetic history; they are not very useful in isolation in helping to identify near relatives. People can have the same haplotype and not be close relatives at all. With regard to Y-DNA, closely related men will have the same haplotype.

I have tested with 23AndMe and transferred my results to Family Tree DNA. I have spent several days looking at trees there and contacting matches to ask them if they have trees elsewhere. I have been able to confirm some really distant connections because my match and I have extensive trees. My matches at 23AndMe still have a very disappointing response rate. If you are interested in genealogy - and this is a genealogy forum - you will get more data from FTDNA than 23AndMe. I have not tested with Ancestry.com and do not have a tree there. I do have one at GEDmatch.

Anyone hoping to find close relatives should have autosomal testing. Men should also do Y-DNA with FTDNA. The autosomal testing can find matches from parents to siblings to cousins and aunts and uncles - if they have also tested. Y-DNA can perhaps find a man's father's surname. In the OP's situation, if his Jewish ancestry is paternal, his Y-DNA might find a Jewish surname
.
Oh....

And not to be quaint. But just oh.

50% results mean something to me...
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:25 PM
 
473 posts, read 355,876 times
Reputation: 324
These tests show MRS. Obama was 75% caucasian...Is bogus fad to have these home DNA tests run...Save your money...Can only tell if DNA is match enough to parent/siblings/maybe grands, rest is just overstated advertisement lies.
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Old 08-16-2017, 11:24 AM
 
3,496 posts, read 5,156,728 times
Reputation: 5206
Quote:
Originally Posted by cattalk1 View Post
These tests show MRS. Obama was 75% caucasian...Is bogus fad to have these home DNA tests run...Save your money...Can only tell if DNA is match enough to parent/siblings/maybe grands, rest is just overstated advertisement lies.
Either you are horribly misinformed, or you are deliberately spreading misinformation. In either case you should refrain from giving an opinion on something you know nothing about.
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