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Old 08-20-2017, 08:53 PM
 
3,496 posts, read 5,156,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
Thanks for the comments everyone. I'm here soaking in all the information. I was linked to a first cousin on 23andMe and have narrowed this down that my father was 100% Ashkenazi. I am communicating with the person now I'm unsure how much they are going to share but at this point I'm 99% certain my father was the Ashekenazi part.
How did you arrive at the conclusion that your father was Ashkenazi and not your mother? I ask because often people base this on false assumptions of various kinds.

It may be that you found out this 1st cousin has one or more uncles and no aunts. That would be a good clue. But a better clue would come from your Ancestry Composition chromosome painting on the X chromosome. But a "1st cousin" match could also be something else, like a half-aunt or half-uncle, a half-niece or half-nephew.
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Old 08-25-2017, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Second, Ashkenazi Jews are generally from Germany.
I'm not sure about that... maybe if we traced ALL the way back, but most Ashkenazis (myself included) I know descend from Russia/Former Soviet Union, Poland, and thereabouts. I'm 93% Ashkenazi Jewish according to our 23andMe (brother did it), and most of our family comes from Russia/Ukraine and Poland.
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Old 08-25-2017, 06:50 PM
 
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The original homeland of Ashkenazi Jews is Germany. The population bottlenecked 600-800 years ago when the ancestral population dropped to about 350 people. All Ashkenazi Jews are no more than 30th cousins from each other. These genetic tests which search for family based on genetics are inherently unreliable for Ashkenazi Jews for this reason.
They moved east to Poland in about the 15th-16th century. Before that point, there is a good chance your family lived in Germany.
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Old 08-26-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,269 posts, read 14,335,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
I'm not sure about that... maybe if we traced ALL the way back, but most Ashkenazis (myself included) I know descend from Russia/Former Soviet Union, Poland, and thereabouts. I'm 93% Ashkenazi Jewish according to our 23andMe (brother did it), and most of our family comes from Russia/Ukraine and Poland.
They definitely spread out to other areas but originally settled along the Rhine River - the move eastward started in the late Middle Ages so it's likely this was too long ago for you to trace back that far: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashkenazi_Jews

"Ashkenazim originate from the Jews who settled along the Rhine River, in Western Germany and Northern France.[22] There they became a distinct diaspora community with a unique way of life that adapted traditions from Babylon, The Land of Israel, and the Western Mediterranean to their new environment.[23] The Ashkenazi religious rite developed in cities such as Mainz, Worms, and Troyes. The eminent French Rishon Rabbi Shlomo Itzhaki (Rashi) would have a significant impact on the Jewish religion.

In the late Middle Ages, the majority of the Ashkenazi population shifted steadily eastward,[24] moving out of the Holy Roman Empire into the areas later comprised in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (comprising parts of present-day Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine).[25][26] In the course of the late 18th and 19th centuries, those Jews who remained in or returned to the German lands experienced a cultural reorientation; under the influence of the Haskalah and the struggle for emancipation, as well as the intellectual and cultural ferment in urban centers, they gradually abandoned the use of Yiddish, while developing new forms of Jewish religious life and cultural identity.[27]"
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