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Old 10-16-2017, 08:14 AM
 
3,483 posts, read 5,139,862 times
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Because you made this statement which is false:

Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Saying they're not necessarily a match on your mother's side is a little misleading because it would lead most people to believe it means they could be a match on their father's side, which for men, is not possible.
This statement is misleading people to believe that the X-match ("they") cannot be related on the father's side. The X-DNA cannot come from a male's father, but usually it is noise on the X chromosome that causes FTDNA to label a match as an "X-match" when in fact they can just as well be related on the father's side through autosomal DNA because in most cases the shared X segment is noise.

Bottom line to the original question: DO NOT go by "X-Matches" in Family Finder (if you are male) to determine whether someone is a maternal relative. Most people think this is an easy way to find maternal relatives but they are wrong. Forget about "X-Matches" in Family Finder (FTDNA). In 99% of cases, the shared X-DNA with those matches is noise and not indicative of an actual relationship through the mother. If you find a segment of X-DNA over about 15 cM then it is more likely to be a real segment inherited from your mother. None of this suggests in any way that you could have inherited the X-DNA from your father which you cannot if you are male. It will be the autosomal DNA which determines the relationship.

23andMe is more responsible with its X matching. They use a higher threshold and will even count someone as a match who shares only X DNA with you (a significant amount) and no autosomal DNA. I was able to discover a relationship with one of these matches on both of our maternal sides following the X pattern of inheritance going back to an ancestor born in 1673.
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,298,122 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Because you made this statement which is false:

This statement is misleading people to believe that the X-match ("they") cannot be related on the father's side. The X-DNA cannot come from a male's father, but usually it is noise on the X chromosome that causes FTDNA to label a match as an "X-match" when in fact they can just as well be related on the father's side through autosomal DNA because in most cases the shared X segment is noise.

Bottom line to the original question: DO NOT go by "X-Matches" in Family Finder (if you are male) to determine whether someone is a maternal relative. Most people think this is an easy way to find maternal relatives but they are wrong. Forget about "X-Matches" in Family Finder (FTDNA). In 99% of cases, the shared X-DNA with those matches is noise and not indicative of an actual relationship through the mother. If you find a segment of X-DNA over about 15 cM then it is more likely to be a real segment inherited from your mother. None of this suggests in any way that you could have inherited the X-DNA from your father which you cannot if you are male. It will be the autosomal DNA which determines the relationship.

23andMe is more responsible with its X matching. They use a higher threshold and will even count someone as a match who shares only X DNA with you (a significant amount) and no autosomal DNA. I was able to discover a relationship with one of these matches on both of our maternal sides following the X pattern of inheritance going back to an ancestor born in 1673.
This has gone far beyond what the OP asked for or probably even understands. Serious, stop being so pedantic.

I'll say again: Shared DNA on the X chromosome CANNOT come from a male's father. The end.
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:22 AM
 
10,077 posts, read 5,195,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
This has gone far beyond what the OP asked for or probably even understands. Serious, stop being so pedantic.

I'll say again: Shared DNA on the X chromosome CANNOT come from a male's father. The end.
some men are xxy, stop talking like things are absolutes

they could test mitochonrial dna if they want to trace the mother's lineage
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,298,122 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
some men are xxy, stop talking like things are absolutes
That's a chromosomal disorder effecting approximately 0.1-0.2% of the male population, and we're not talking about rare chromosomal disorders. I think someone would know if they had Klinefelter syndrome and had to take that into consideration when comparing X-matches. That's NOT what the OP is asking about, stop derailing the topic.

Quote:
they could test mitochonrial dna if they want to trace the mother's lineage
That only includes their direct maternal line, not their entire maternal side. Furthermore, it tends not to be particularly useful for recent genealogy.
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Old 10-16-2017, 04:06 PM
 
3,483 posts, read 5,139,862 times
Reputation: 5192
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
This has gone far beyond what the OP asked for or probably even understands. Serious, stop being so pedantic.

I'll say again: Shared DNA on the X chromosome CANNOT come from a male's father. The end.
I never said that. Stop putting words in my mouth.

And I actually think you don't understand how it works. So stop misleading people.
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Old 10-16-2017, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,298,122 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I never said that. Stop putting words in my mouth.
I didn't say you did - I said your words were "a little misleading", not incorrect.

Quote:
And I actually think you don't understand how it works. So stop misleading people.
Then you're obviously not reading what I've said.
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Dalton Gardens
2,812 posts, read 5,717,925 times
Reputation: 1634
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I didn't say you did - I said your words were "a little misleading", not incorrect.



Then you're obviously not reading what I've said.
Since you seem to have a very good grasp of DNA results, just one question... should I ignore X-Matches at FTDNA? When it comes to research or photography I am very, very good, but I have really been struggling with DNA and matches.
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