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Old 10-21-2017, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,267 posts, read 14,330,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
No.

I don't like going to funerals and seeing the guest of honor "laid out" for people to gawk at.
Um, it's not to gawk at, it's so people can say goodbye. Some people feel it's easier to do that when they can see the person.

Quote:
When having to attend such events, I try to immediately determine the location of the deceased and keep my back to them.
That seems pretty disrespectful, if you ask me.
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Old 10-21-2017, 08:10 PM
 
9,968 posts, read 16,597,497 times
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I'd like to point out there is a difference between post-mortem photos, and pictures of the deceased.


In the Victorian/Edwardian post-mortem photos, the deceased was posed as though still living. He might be posed as playing with toys, sitting with other family members, etc.


A picture of the deceased, as many do today, is a picture of the deceased, laid out in their casket, ready for burial, and clearly dead. I still have some photos of my grandmother in her casket, shortly before her burial I'd rather not have them and would like to throw them away, but I don't feel quite right about doing so. The pictures were taken to send to family members who couldn't attend the funeral.


PM pictures were oftentimes the only picture ever taken of the deceased, and effort was taken to make them appear living, to have some sort of memento, and so descendants could have an image of their likeness.
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Old 10-22-2017, 07:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post



That seems pretty disrespectful, if you ask me.

While you're welcome to make the statement, you most certainly were NOT asked.
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Old 10-22-2017, 11:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
While you're welcome to make the statement, you most certainly were NOT asked.
Come on, folks! Can't we get back on-topic?
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Old 10-22-2017, 12:25 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
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One of the main reasons post mortem photos were so popular was the high mortality rate among children in that era. Grieving parents wanted a remembrance of a family member who passed at such a young age. Some of the photos of adults would be considered bizarre by today's sensibilities. Folks were dressed up and put in an erect position and held up by concealed stands with family members. To make the photos as realistic as possible pupils were carefully drawn over the closed eyelids of the deceased.
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Old 10-22-2017, 02:21 PM
 
9,968 posts, read 16,597,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
One of the main reasons post mortem photos were so popular was the high mortality rate among children in that era. Grieving parents wanted a remembrance of a family member who passed at such a young age. Some of the photos of adults would be considered bizarre by today's sensibilities. Folks were dressed up and put in an erect position and held up by concealed stands with family members. To make the photos as realistic as possible pupils were carefully drawn over the closed eyelids of the deceased.


Like I said earlier, I inherited an album with two post-mortem photos. It took awhile to realize what they were. I just don't know what to do with them when I'm gone, I'm the last of the line. Perhaps I could donate the album to a museum. They were from New Castle, PA, and a local museum would like pictures of actual people from that time, not just pictures of buildings, statues, etc. I might go ahead and donate it soon, after making copies for myself. I just couldn't bear the thought of them being gawked at online or in a flea market.
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Old 10-22-2017, 04:11 PM
 
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Brrrr, creepy subject. I don't believe we have any such photos in our family, thankfully. When my mother passed away, several relatives tried to "convince" (more like force) me to look at her body, even going so far as to tell me I would deeply regret it if I didn't. I continually refused and they finally gave up. Almost 20 years later, I have not regretted it for a second and am still very glad I did not cave.
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Old 10-22-2017, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,267 posts, read 14,330,048 times
Reputation: 12085
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
While you're welcome to make the statement, you most certainly were NOT asked.
And you weren't asked about how you behave at open casket funerals either, but you felt the need to share the somewhat off topic information to begin with.

Anyway, to get back on topic... in history, people took post-mortem photos because often, the deceased was never photographed and this was the family's only chance to have a photo to remember them by. To me, that's understandable. I don't really see why someone would want to take a photo of the deceased today.
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