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Old 11-17-2017, 02:13 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
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Many years ago I was acquainted with a gentleman whose ancestors were recipients of a "land grant" from the King of England. The property, in Virginia, was quite large and at the time I knew this man, was still intact.

Apparently, it was common for recipients of such land grants to be titled "Squire".
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Old 11-17-2017, 10:12 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX USA
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I always though a Squire was a Knights apprentice. An errend boy who carried the knights shield/weapons
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Old 11-17-2017, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Hill PA
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Is it possible it is a shortened form of Esquire, which was a title given to lawyers ? You mention that he did some duties in that realm.
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Old 11-17-2017, 10:54 AM
 
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^^^ Yes, to the above. Back in the day, people could "read law" rather than attend law school - they'd study with an established lawyer until they were able to practice themselves (not sure if any kind of bar exam was present). Henry Clay read law with George Wythe in Williamsburg (as had Thomas Jefferson), and was a highly respected lawyer all of his later life.

Notary publics could also be termed "squire". One of my late great uncles was a "squire" - he was not a lawyer, but could draw up deeds and handle other non-criminal legal affairs, and may have been able to conduct marriages and draw up wills. This would have been in post-Civil War NW Arkansas
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Old 11-17-2017, 11:10 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Me007gold View Post
I always though a Squire was a Knights apprentice. An errend boy who carried the knights shield/weapons
Yes, that was what a squire was in Medieval times. I guess enough squires got land given to them from their knights that they became landowners in later times! Anyway, the term has evolved to a landowner - in England - and probably just an honorific for someone well respected in the "New World."
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Old 11-17-2017, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Nope. He was a blacksmith.....


But I think he also served as the town's Justice of the Peace, and Postmaster......perhaps that's how he acquired the title "squire"
I think you've got it -- Apparently Justices of the Peace were given the title Squire in the past in this country:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squire#United_States
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Old 11-17-2017, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Well "Esquire" indicates a lawyer. Maybe just a short form of that title.
wiki sez:
"In contemporary American usage, squire is the title given to justices of the peace or similar local dignitaries."
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Old 11-17-2017, 10:28 PM
 
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Squire came from England, and meant a "Knights Companion". Kind of like a butler, or other person serving someone of higher status. Some people in this country, started adding it to their name, to make them sound more important, not realizing it really meant someones personal servant.

Squire - Name Meaning, What does Squire mean?
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Old 11-18-2017, 01:28 AM
 
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Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
Squire came from England, and meant a "Knights Companion". Kind of like a butler, or other person serving someone of higher status. Some people in this country, started adding it to their name, to make them sound more important, not realizing it really meant someones personal servant.

Squire - Name Meaning, What does Squire mean?
Well, my G-G GF was German.....it will be interesting to research just exactly how he acquired this "title", or maybe he just gave it to himself
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Old 11-18-2017, 02:14 AM
 
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I have a 19th century ancestor who held the title 'Squire. I found the mention in a newspaper, but not elsewhere in his paper trail. This particular ancestor was a farmer with lots of land in Virginia. He was also a judge within his district of his small regional town. I found that fact from another newspaper article mentioned his name along with his district which included officers, judges, and clerks who would monitor the polls on election day.

Although I have not researched it much, I had assumed that esquire was someone who owned land.
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