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Old 02-25-2018, 10:12 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
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In the past few years since so many people have had their DNA tested on Ancestry, 23&Me, etc., have the scientists done any updates to the origination locations and migration of haplogroups? When I search the subject online, I am not seeing anything recent.
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Old 02-25-2018, 11:04 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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I see research related to Bell Beaker migrations and other groups and some is recent but the testing companies are slow to react.

Ancient DNA tells tales of humans' migrant history | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past

The research and findings are interesting but I don’t follow haplogroups that much since they predate my interests by 4,000 years or more.
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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I know they periodically find new subclades - I don't know how much more research has been done on existing haplogroups, it probably varies depending on the haplogroup.
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Old 02-26-2018, 11:36 AM
AFP
 
7,334 posts, read 5,152,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
I see research related to Bell Beaker migrations and other groups and some is recent but the testing companies are slow to react.

Ancient DNA tells tales of humans' migrant history | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past

The research and findings are interesting but I don’t follow haplogroups that much since they predate my interests by 4,000 years or more.

Interesting findings. Regionalists will hate this "OUCH!" Wink


[SIZE=5]"When we look at the data, we see surprises again and again and again," says Reich.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=5]Together with his lab's previous work and that of other pioneers of ancient DNA, the Big Picture message is that our prehistoric ancestors were not nearly as homebound as once thought.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=5]"There was a view that migration is a very rare process in human evolution," Reich explains. Not so, says the ancient DNA. Actually, Reich says, "[/SIZE]
[SIZE=5]"the view that's emerging - for which David is an eloquent advocate - is that human populations are moving and mixing all the time," [/SIZE]
[SIZE=5][/SIZE]
[SIZE=5][/SIZE]
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