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Old 03-25-2018, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 538,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by settled00 View Post
thank you OzarkNation. This is helpful! I'll put my order in the coming days and will report back then.
You are welcome!
I have seen 23andMe kits for sale at Wal-Mart, they are located near the Pharmacy.

And by the way, I have CLOVIS ancestry as well, take a look at this test from Gedmatch:
//www.city-data.com/forum/membe...archaicdna.gif
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Old 03-26-2018, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
10,014 posts, read 15,521,748 times
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Very interesting. Your people went from what is now Hungary, across Russia to Siberia and probably walked across what is now the Bering Strait and down to Oregon/Washington.
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Old 03-26-2018, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,309,458 times
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I really don't think the archaic test comparison at Gedmatch means very much. Pretty much everyone matches each of the archaic test kits - at least, everyone of European descent seems to.
Attached Thumbnails
Ethnicity Results from DNA Test-archaic_a209135_eb4566-point5cm.gif  
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Old 03-26-2018, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 538,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I really don't think the archaic test comparison at Gedmatch means very much. Pretty much everyone matches each of the archaic test kits - at least, everyone of European descent seems to.
Is weird that I have a lot of CLOVIS and almost zero of Kennewick
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Old 03-26-2018, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 538,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Very interesting. Your people went from what is now Hungary, across Russia to Siberia and probably walked across what is now the Bering Strait and down to Oregon/Washington.
Apparently Native Americans also crossed the ocean to Iceland. People from Iceland are MtDna C1, which is Native American
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Old 03-26-2018, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Ohio
21,300 posts, read 15,086,092 times
Reputation: 17731
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
I have 1.3% Balkan but I have no known Balkan ancestors.
People migrate.

My Y-DNA Haplogroup is J2, which is Trans-Caucus/Middle East, yet my paternal line stems from the United Kingdom. The most reasonable explanation is that an ancestor from one of the Middle Eastern Roman Provinces was a legionnaire who ended up in Britain with a Roman Legion and either remained after the Romans withdrew or his children remained.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
The ISOGG site gives Ancestry a low rating for it ethnicity report, a 4.5 on a scale of 1-10, and says this about it:

"Overall rating: 4.5
The Genetic Ethnicity Summary consistently overestimates the Central European and Scandinavian ancestral components for people whose ancestors were from the British Isles. The ancestral component from the British Isles is overestimated for people whose ancestors were from continental Europe. Overall, the European ancestry predictions tend to be inaccurate."
My ethnicity report has been 100% spot on.

It shows 5% Scandinavian, and I have distant cousins living in present-day Scandinavia. For the Western European component, I can trace ancestors back to France, Germany and the Netherlands, going back as far as my 16th great-grandfather.
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Old 03-27-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,536 posts, read 40,015,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
But because inheritance and recombination is random, siblings do not get the same DNA or the same amounts of DNA from each ancestor.

Here's an example. Let's say you had one grandparent from Italy, one from Britain, one from China, and one from India.

That doesn't mean you should expect your DNA ethnicity report to be exactly 25% Italian, 25% Britain, 25% Chinese, and 25% Indian, because although we inherit 50% from each parent, we do not inherit exactly 25% from each grandparent.

So the 50% you got from your dad may have included:
32% from your Italian paternal grandmother
18% from your British paternal grandfather

And the 50% from your mother:
20% from your Chinese maternal grandmother
30% from your Indian maternal grandfather

Meanwhile, your sibling might have got:
24% from your Italian paternal grandmother
26% from your British paternal grandfather
34% from your Chinese maternal grandmother
16% from your Indian maternal grandfather

The further back your last "full blooded" ancestor was on your tree, the more these amounts can vary. Sometimes you can inherit nothing from one 3rd great grandparent, for example, yet inherit a solid 8% from another 3rd great grandparent. Meanwhile, your sibling could have inherited from that 3rd great grandparent that you didn't, meaning your sibling got a DNA result in a category you didn't.

It's true the DNA ethnicity report is also an estimate, and on a sub-continental level, is not necessarily accurate because people within continents share so much DNA. That does play into the varying reports for siblings too. But even if this wasn't an issue and the reports were totally accurate, siblings would still expect to have different percentages for the same categories, and even sometimes find one sibling has small results in a category the other doesn't.

Also, DNA ethnicity reports are much more accurate on a continental level. And since we do inherit 50% from each parent, using the above example, both siblings could reasonably expect to be 50% European and 50% Asian.



Yes, ethnicity is not defined by DNA alone. And it's true that companies heavily market the ethnicity part of the DNA test even though it's only an estimate. But it can still be very interesting with the understanding of how it works.
Yeppers.

I KNOW that a big chunk of my ancestry is German - and I even know they are from southern Germany and Switzerland. But it just didn't show up in my DNA other than vaguely "northern European" with 6 percent "French or German." Yes, well I also have a big chunk of French ancestry - but apparently not a big chunk of French or German DNA.

However, I inherited a huge chunk (about 70 percent) of my DNA from my British Isles ancestors - English, Scottish, and Irish in that order. Then surprisingly, I got a big chunk from one or two Scandinavian and Finnish ancestors from many generations back. Heck, I didn't even know about them. Without exception that we know of, my ancestors have been in the US since the 1600s and 1700s. So wow.

Interestingly (to me, anyway) in spite of my very German maiden name, I've always been drawn to and very interested in British history, art, literature, music, etc. I think it has something to do with my DNA. And I have a very typical "English rose" complexion.

My brother, on the other hand, looks more German. His coloring is more southern German. Not only that, he loves German history. He is really "into" all things German. He hasn't had his DNA tested but I am willing to bet that he got a much bigger chunk of German ancestry than I did.

I am so curious about that that I'm willing to pay for him to get tested. But I think he's paranoid about it.
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Old 03-27-2018, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,309,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
People migrate.

My Y-DNA Haplogroup is J2, which is Trans-Caucus/Middle East, yet my paternal line stems from the United Kingdom. The most reasonable explanation is that an ancestor from one of the Middle Eastern Roman Provinces was a legionnaire who ended up in Britain with a Roman Legion and either remained after the Romans withdrew or his children remained.
J2 is from 18,500 years ago (+/- 3,500 years), so this is prehistoric, from the Upper Paleolithic period. Your lineage could have migrated to Europe and into the UK many millennia before the Roman Empire, so I would not make such assumptions.
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Old 03-27-2018, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
5,263 posts, read 8,468,361 times
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In case anyone is wondering. Those numbers to the left of the archaic samples are kit numbers that can be entered into the GEDmatch utilities like any other kit number. For fun, try entering La Brana man into the eye color utility, or run an admix test with Oracle and watch them match themselves!

My guess is that if you are into running Tier One utilities, these ancient populations could be useful in IDing small SNPs that folks have in common because of preseved archaic segments rather than recent modern ancestors. That said, I think you would have to trying to ID some pretty short segments for the archaic matches to come into play.
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 538,888 times
Reputation: 787
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
In case anyone is wondering. Those numbers to the left of the archaic samples are kit numbers that can be entered into the GEDmatch utilities like any other kit number. For fun, try entering La Brana man into the eye color utility, or run an admix test with Oracle and watch them match themselves!

My guess is that if you are into running Tier One utilities, these ancient populations could be useful in IDing small SNPs that folks have in common because of preseved archaic segments rather than recent modern ancestors. That said, I think you would have to trying to ID some pretty short segments for the archaic matches to come into play.
So, those people were our Grandparents thousand of years ago?
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