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Old 07-03-2018, 12:57 AM
 
25,375 posts, read 18,886,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
Not looking to do so and most indgenous people get no benefits for being native.



These are myths. I'm black and people like to think us black people get "benefits" and free college and other "stuff" as well that is not true.



I was just happy that his results confirmed my research of his family back to the 1600s and due to his results, I believe that he has more indigenous ancestors than what I initially thought he had. The community where his 2nd great grandparents were/are from has a lot of "tri-racial" families and it makes me believe that he also has some indigenous ancestors on his 2nd great grandfather's family - I already had researched and known about the 2nd great grandmother but feel the grandfather may have some indigenous ancestry as well so am reviewing that side of the family based on his results showing nearly 2% NA.
Those who are members of federally recognized tribes do.

https://www.benefits.gov/benefits/br...ry/category/61

Those are the various benefits they get. It includes various scholarships, home loans, etc.

This isn't what most people think, there's factual and direct evidence from this.

Of course, it takes a lot of paperwork to pull this off, and each tribe has it's own requirements in terms of percentage of Native ancestry and the documentation required to be accepted.

Jewish people also get certain benefits, such as four countries in European having a right to return for Jewish people and of course the Israeli right to return. There are also a lot of organizations that assist Jewish people. I personally know this because I, who am part Jewish am in Spain due to the Jewish right to return laws passed three years ago.
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Old 07-03-2018, 04:48 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
3,847 posts, read 1,906,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Jewish people also get certain benefits, such as four countries in European having a right to return for Jewish people and of course the Israeli right to return. There are also a lot of organizations that assist Jewish people. I personally know this because I, who am part Jewish am in Spain due to the Jewish right to return laws passed three years ago.
So just out of curiosity, what are the other 3 European countries who allow right of return for Jews? After my grandparents and their siblings fled areas now in modern day Belarus and Ukraine, I have no desire to go there. Not even to visit.

Added for context: all 4 of my grandparents came through Ellis Island in the early 1900s. All were Ashkenazi Jews.
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Old 07-04-2018, 12:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
So just out of curiosity, what are the other 3 European countries who allow right of return for Jews? After my grandparents and their siblings fled areas now in modern day Belarus and Ukraine, I have no desire to go there. Not even to visit.

Added for context: all 4 of my grandparents came through Ellis Island in the early 1900s. All were Ashkenazi Jews.
Germany and Poland allow the descendants of people who fled due to the Holocaust to return. A person doesn't have to be religiously Jewish, just a descendent from someone whose citizenship was stripped or fled due to the Holocaust.

Spain and Portugal have a right of return for the descendants of Sephardic Jews expelled due to the Spanish Inquisition. One does not have to be religiously Jewish for this either, just a descendent of Sephardim. North and South America have 100 million Crypto-Jews, people partially descended from Jews but whose families did not maintain Judaism.

Spain, Portugal, Germany, and Poland are EU countries, so someone with citizenship in an EU nation has the right to work and live anywhere in the EU. That has substantial benefits in business/career, so a lot of people are applying for citizenship in these countries.
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Old 07-27-2018, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Ohio
21,264 posts, read 15,049,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Those are the various benefits they get. It includes various scholarships, home loans, etc.
And free healthcare. Look at the budget and you'll see a line-item for the Indian Health Bureau.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Spain, Portugal, Germany, and Poland are EU countries, so someone with citizenship in an EU nation has the right to work and live anywhere in the EU. That has substantial benefits in business/career, so a lot of people are applying for citizenship in these countries.
And legal issues.

When I was working as a consultant on a documentary in London, the producer asked me, "What happens if the American government comes after you?" I told him I already had it figured out. First they'll have to find me, and they'll find me in the State of Rhineland-Pfalz, Germany. The people of Rhineland-Pfalz aren't anti-American, but they are anti-American government, and in particular, anti-American military. There isn't a judge anywhere in Rhineland-Pfalz that would grant an extradition request, and once it's denied, it's binding on all EU member-States, so I can come back to London and flip off the American embassy without any consequences. I own a house and lots of land in Romania, so I can always stay there, and I'm retiring there anyway.
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Old 07-29-2018, 12:39 AM
 
16,208 posts, read 8,476,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Those who are members of federally recognized tribes do.

https://www.benefits.gov/benefits/br...ry/category/61

Those are the various benefits they get. It includes various scholarships, home loans, etc.

This isn't what most people think, there's factual and direct evidence from this.

Of course, it takes a lot of paperwork to pull this off, and each tribe has it's own requirements in terms of percentage of Native ancestry and the documentation required to be accepted.

Jewish people also get certain benefits, such as four countries in European having a right to return for Jewish people and of course the Israeli right to return. There are also a lot of organizations that assist Jewish people. I personally know this because I, who am part Jewish am in Spain due to the Jewish right to return laws passed three years ago.

The tribe my grandfather descends from was recently recognized - Nansemond of VA.

I have DNA cousins who are members of the tribe. They don't get anything from it. I don't plan on becoming a member since I am not culturally a native American and don't see a need to join a tribe.
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Old 08-02-2018, 11:55 AM
 
4,263 posts, read 10,025,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Anyone with a parent or grandparent from whatever European nation can get citizenship, provide one is able to produce the relevant documents.

So genealogy does have tangible applications to our lives. Someone with citizenship in one European Union nation is eligible to work in any European nation.
3 of my 4 grandparents are documented but most of that documentation is related to naturalization as US citizens. During naturalization they renounced citizenship specifically in the Republic of Poland. As far as I can tell that disqualifies me from claiming Polish citizenship. Also 2 out of the 3 came over prior to 1920, and the post-1920 emigrant for some reason was then in Czechoslovakia (and renounced that, too).

The 4th grandparent was born in USA to immigrants, her father (my great-grandfather) twice filed "declarations of intention" during both WW1 and WW2 but never finished naturalization.

I don't think that's quite enough for me to get an EU passport, is it?
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Old 08-03-2018, 04:49 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,545 posts, read 22,525,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
3 of my 4 grandparents are documented but most of that documentation is related to naturalization as US citizens. During naturalization they renounced citizenship specifically in the Republic of Poland. As far as I can tell that disqualifies me from claiming Polish citizenship. Also 2 out of the 3 came over prior to 1920, and the post-1920 emigrant for some reason was then in Czechoslovakia (and renounced that, too).

The 4th grandparent was born in USA to immigrants, her father (my great-grandfather) twice filed "declarations of intention" during both WW1 and WW2 but never finished naturalization.

I don't think that's quite enough for me to get an EU passport, is it?
I've been trying to get more involved in the Europe section; so far I'm reading that you have to have at least grandparent ties to various EU countries. My parents came over from Hungary in the late 50's, I'm not sure what was involved with them being citizens but both were; my dad is deceased.

I would think they would have had to denounce where they came from in order to qualify here at least in the late 1800's to early 1900's.

I have a Hungarian neighbor that translates for me with my Hungarian cousin and uncle. She came over in the 80's. I told her we could pack up and move back if we wanted, she told me her 80 year old mother was thinking of filing dual citizenship. I haven't asked why yet; but it's not something I had seen mentioned.

There are a lot of threads having to do with Americans moving to Europe. Not hard to find with a search.
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Old 09-20-2018, 01:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
3 of my 4 grandparents are documented but most of that documentation is related to naturalization as US citizens. During naturalization they renounced citizenship specifically in the Republic of Poland. As far as I can tell that disqualifies me from claiming Polish citizenship. Also 2 out of the 3 came over prior to 1920, and the post-1920 emigrant for some reason was then in Czechoslovakia (and renounced that, too).

The 4th grandparent was born in USA to immigrants, her father (my great-grandfather) twice filed "declarations of intention" during both WW1 and WW2 but never finished naturalization.

I don't think that's quite enough for me to get an EU passport, is it?
You should contact the Polish consulate or a Polish citizenship lawyer to be sure. But having a Polish grandparent alone probably qualifies you as most EU nations will grand citizenship to the grandchildren of citizens.
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Old 09-20-2018, 01:20 AM
 
25,375 posts, read 18,886,582 times
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Ancestry.com just updated it's results and boy are they widely different from what they were before. You can see lots of comments on this.

Re: research, I was able to trace the Jewish lines of my family further back to the 1600s. Essentially after being thrown out of Spain due to the Inquisition, they went to England. And then to American.

In the early 1800s, my African ancestors were listed by numbers of males and females, and by ages. Slaves weren't referred to by name. So that's a brick wall that it is simply impossible to get around really. I've done research on the countries of origin in terms of what countries supplied large numbers of slaves to the states my family was living in the 1700s and so.

I'd say MyHeritage, DNA.Land, and FTDNA all do better jobs of correlating the paper trail I found.
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Old 09-20-2018, 01:33 AM
 
4,152 posts, read 2,291,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
In the early 1800s, my African ancestors were listed by numbers of males and females, and by ages. Slaves weren't referred to by name. So that's a brick wall that it is simply impossible to get around really.

Lucky for me, one of my black ancestors fought in the Civil War. This person COMPLETELY spoiled me, because it really wasn't that hard to find them (in that it didn't take me years LOL). The other branches haven't been as successful, but it's going to take some time. You have to do a lot more detective work. If you have been primarily doing direct line, you need to start making note of siblings. Look to see who else lived in the area. See if there were white families near those ancestors. You will likely have to figure out who those people are. One of my ancestors from MS got sent to a convict farm after slavery was abolished. I looked up the person who owned the farm. Turns out this person owned lots of land in the area...I'm sure there are bills of sale and deeds galore. I haven't started looking into that person because it's going to be overwhelming. You'll have to get creative to break those walls, but it's possible. Hopefully your ancestors were not from the worst slave states. I hate when something takes me back to Mississippi , but there is rich history there. I just have to do a lot more work to find it. The state of NC has excellent online tools. I love them! If you're from the east coast you probably have ancestors from that area. And hopefully Virginia. Virginians did not play about their documentation. Good luck! I'll offer help when I can, but I'm still very new to this.
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