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Old 04-30-2018, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,342 posts, read 2,987,690 times
Reputation: 5688

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmm0484 View Post
Why not just ask for search warrants when needing to review the DNA matching services, like for any other evidence? It is just a matter of setting up the procedure.

I am very happy that this reprehensible cretin was caught, mind you, but the method the police used needs to be vetted for privacy concerns.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_warrant
Second cousins share a great grandparent
Third cousins share a great great grandparent
Fourth cousins share a third great grandparent

From your link:
Quote:
A search warrant is a court order that a magistrate or judge issues to authorize law enforcement officers to conduct a search of a person, location, or vehicle for evidence of a crime and to confiscate any evidence they find.
What evidence of a crime would a search warrant of a residence of third or fourth cousin provide? I think a request for a search warrant would be laughed out of court. Plus, being a distant cousin isn’t a crime.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,309,458 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
This doesn't bother me. What does bother me is how easy it is to plant DNA evidence. We need to tread carefully here. I'm not against this in theory, or for privacy concerns, but strict oversight will be needed.
Physical DNA material (saliva, blood, etc) can't be created from the numerical raw DNA data we get from consumer DNA testing companies. For one thing, it doesn't contain the full genome, and even if it did, I am not sure physical material can be created from the numerical data unless maybe you're a scientist with highly specialized equipment.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,309,458 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
I was surprised that there were only about 100 distant relatives that matched and the nearest, genetically speaking, was possibly 3rd cousin. Did I understand that correctly?

Is that what most people are finding? I know that Gedmatch stops at 2000 matches, because those in my immediate family hit that ceiling.

Out of curiosity I checked FTDNA and saw my father had 4,938 matches, of which 476 were identified as 2nd-4th cousins.

I'm thinking if it took the investigators 4 months to work through 100 distant relatives, my family's distant relatives have plenty of time to start packing...
I didn't read the exact wording on that in the news, but it may have been that only about 100 had gedcoms/trees uploaded for them to work with. Relatives that don't have trees uploaded aren't of much use and in my experience, most people at Gedmatch don't upload a gedcom.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,309,458 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmm0484 View Post
Why not just ask for search warrants when needing to review the DNA matching services, like for any other evidence? It is just a matter of setting up the procedure.

I am very happy that this reprehensible cretin was caught, mind you, but the method the police used needs to be vetted for privacy concerns.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_warrant
Because it's a public database and therefore a search warrant isn't needed. I'm not even sure they can get a search warrant when it's not necessary. It would be a waste of the police's and court's time and resources.
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Old 04-30-2018, 12:40 PM
 
1,263 posts, read 1,122,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarknation View Post
Anyone can go to Gedmatch, upload a DNA file and find relatives....
I think cops are doing this very often.
Maybe they create fake profiles at Gedmatch, upload a file and they get what they are looking for
In order to upload the perpetrator's DNA into the site, the investigators had to agree that it was their own DNA sample or they had permission to do so from whoever it belonged to. That will be an interesting argument and ruling.
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Old 04-30-2018, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,255 posts, read 14,309,458 times
Reputation: 12070
Quote:
Originally Posted by j7r6s View Post
In order to upload the perpetrator's DNA into the site, the investigators had to agree that it was their own DNA sample or they had permission to do so from whoever it belonged to. That will be an interesting argument and ruling.
They just needed legal authority to use the DNA, which they had since it's evidence from a crime scene. Police compare DNA evidence from crime scenes to other DNA samples all the time because they have the authority to do so. The only difference is, it's normally compared to a criminal database, not a public one. But that doesn't mean they don't have the legal authority to use the DNA. And everyone in the public database has consented to have their DNA compared with other DNA, so they have the consent of the public database too.

This is the actual wording on Gedmatch: "Please acknowledge that any sample you submit is either your DNA or the DNA of a person for whom you are a legal guardian or have obtained authorization to upload their DNA to GEDmatch". They had authorization. It was not authorization from the person who the sample belonged to, but they had legal authorization, by law, to do so (not because they had a search warrant, but because it was evidence from a crime scene).
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Old 04-30-2018, 03:19 PM
 
26,008 posts, read 18,829,236 times
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I thought this was an interesting read: https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/healt...acy/index.html


This especially caught my eye:


"23andMe has ... suggested that its longer-range goal is to collect a massive biobank of genetic information that can be used and sold for medical research and could also lead to patentable discoveries," wrote George J. Annas, a legal scholar at Boston University School of Public Health, and Dr. Sherman Elias of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.
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Old 04-30-2018, 04:15 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
3,972 posts, read 1,946,053 times
Reputation: 9390
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I thought this was an interesting read: https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/healt...acy/index.html


This especially caught my eye:


"23andMe has ... suggested that its longer-range goal is to collect a massive biobank of genetic information that can be used and sold for medical research and could also lead to patentable discoveries," wrote George J. Annas, a legal scholar at Boston University School of Public Health, and Dr. Sherman Elias of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.
That is no surprise. When you sign up, they ask if you want to participate in research. If you want to, you can go through the gazillion questions they ask. I did this and only skipped a few questions that I didn't feel comfortable with. There were some sets of questions where they indicated what research group was using the data.
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Old 04-30-2018, 04:26 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
21,437 posts, read 20,443,579 times
Reputation: 37587
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I thought this was an interesting read: https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/healt...acy/index.html


This especially caught my eye:


"23andMe has ... suggested that its longer-range goal is to collect a massive biobank of genetic information that can be used and sold for medical research and could also lead to patentable discoveries," wrote George J. Annas, a legal scholar at Boston University School of Public Health, and Dr. Sherman Elias of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.
I read that when I got tested with 23andMe. In fact, that was one of the reasons I chose to go with them. I liked the idea of being able to contribute to medical science. I took quite a few of their little questionnaires that they indicated would be helpful in the database of information. This is nothing new.
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Last edited by in_newengland; 05-01-2018 at 11:33 AM..
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Old 04-30-2018, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,342 posts, read 2,987,690 times
Reputation: 5688
One of 23andMe’s main research focuses is Parkinson’s disease. The ex-husband of the head of 23andMe (divorced in 2015) is Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google. He carries one of the genetic mutations that increases the odds of developing Parkinson’s.

I too was happy to contribute personal medical information along with with genetic data, for both me and my mother. My mother had Lewy Body dementia.
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