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Old 05-08-2018, 01:15 PM
 
Location: the heart is!
4,635 posts, read 4,023,803 times
Reputation: 10120

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Not only am I just getting seriously started and 'dabbling' during my research, I'm not informed enough to know how many people are still using the internet and paper trails (if they can find them) as opposed to the multitude of DNA tests offered by a variety of genealogic sites (or all of the above) but I came across this and thought it could be helpful for some (for colonial ancestors and perhaps men who served in the Revolutionary War).

Perhaps other states held a similar view and the same criteria would apply.

It was not only helpful to me but revealing as to the fact that whether applying widows received pensions or not their information was maintained regardless.

Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution

The 1840 List is especially interesting to researchers as it includes many widows' applications. Widows were required to prove marriage, names of children, etc., data not demanded of soldiers who had only to prove service and eligibility. Widows' applications are, therefore, genealogical gold mines. Even those widows who could not prove marriage and consequently failed to secure pensions----there are many such papers because it was difficult to find proof of marriage which occurred sometimes sixty years earlier in war torn land----gave data which are valuable now to descendants who can frequently in the light of later knowledge, give proof of marriage ceremony.

The List of 1840 is so called because Congress authorized the Census of 1840 to include all pensioners. The list was published therefore as an appendix to the Census of that year. Soldiers and widows who applied too late to be included in the census report of 1840 are listed as of that time although they do not appear on the printed lists.

Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution
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Old 05-08-2018, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
1,037 posts, read 589,660 times
Reputation: 3052
Can't depend solely upon DNA -- it doesn't tell the real story of that person, just the genetic codes. Paper trails, via actual visits to repositories or via internet, remain the single most important means of properly documenting your ancestors.

One eternal source of amusement for me are the census records. Seems my ancestors told some real whoppers in between being semi-factual, and the poor census taker either believed them, misheard them, or just didn't care enough to put it down correctly.

But it sure makes for interesting reading and family genealogy arguments.
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Old 05-09-2018, 07:20 PM
 
Location: the heart is!
4,635 posts, read 4,023,803 times
Reputation: 10120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
Can't depend solely upon DNA -- it doesn't tell the real story of that person, just the genetic codes. Paper trails, via actual visits to repositories or via internet, remain the single most important means of properly documenting your ancestors.

One eternal source of amusement for me are the census records. Seems my ancestors told some real whoppers in between being semi-factual, and the poor census taker either believed them, misheard them, or just didn't care enough to put it down correctly.

But it sure makes for interesting reading and family genealogy arguments.
Thanks for the reply, good to know and as I said I am just getting serious in my efforts and I think it is good to chase paper trails and use the internet.

And yes, I have come across ancestors living in two different states during the same time frame so I am still 'chasing' down the discrepancy in that one.
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Old 05-09-2018, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,242 posts, read 30,096,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeIsWhere... View Post
Thanks for the reply, good to know and as I said I am just getting serious in my efforts and I think it is good to chase paper trails and use the internet.

And yes, I have come across ancestors living in two different states during the same time frame so I am still 'chasing' down the discrepancy in that one.
Keep in mind that borders move. If the states are contiguous, your ancestors may have stayed put but the state boundaries changed.
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Old 05-10-2018, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
1,037 posts, read 589,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Keep in mind that borders move. If the states are contiguous, your ancestors may have stayed put but the state boundaries changed.
And county names changed, county boundaries moved. Several of my ancestors lived on the same farm for generations, but the place names are different.
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Old 05-12-2018, 01:04 AM
 
25,440 posts, read 18,925,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
Can't depend solely upon DNA -- it doesn't tell the real story of that person, just the genetic codes. Paper trails, via actual visits to repositories or via internet, remain the single most important means of properly documenting your ancestors.

One eternal source of amusement for me are the census records. Seems my ancestors told some real whoppers in between being semi-factual, and the poor census taker either believed them, misheard them, or just didn't care enough to put it down correctly.

But it sure makes for interesting reading and family genealogy arguments.
You can depend solely on DNA, depending on what is you're trying to achieve. Of course, documentation is required for certain purposes, like if you're trying to establish citizenship. If records uncover Native American ancestry, one may be eligible for federal tribal membership and one can get financial aid and certain other benefits. Those with Jewish ancestors can get German, Polish, Portuguese, or Spanish citizenship.

These things change, there maybe other benefits from the documentation.
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Old 05-18-2018, 07:06 AM
 
9,286 posts, read 5,525,997 times
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DNS only associate you with some else that is living, due to privacy a lot of the marches don't want anything to do with you in helping. So now you just have a bunch of numbers
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Old 05-18-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
8,138 posts, read 4,450,018 times
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It does depend a lot on what you want to acheive. If your goal is to identify Revolutionary War soldiers or the first and earliest ancestor in the US, the DNA approach won't help. Instead I'd suggest a subscription to something like Ancestry.com or maybe your local library has a subscription account to a similar service. A ninty-day subscription with some search effort would move your family history a long way...probably 150 years in this country. I would recommend doing that before you turn to DNA testing.

If you want to know what part of the world your ancestors came from but don't care much about details or family stories or experiences, the basic DNA test will give you that information. Don't go into it with high expectations because it won't give you detail other than what region your ancestors came from. Keep in mind that different testing companies provide different results based on how they process your DNA sample. I have results from two companies and they are quite different.

DNA test companies will give you hundreds of names of DNA relatives but most will be distant cousins. If you and they have done a basic family history you can often see how you are related but most people don't do the basic research, or at least don't bother to post information like surnames and locations. I have about 3000 DNA relatives but I actually know solid family connections to less than ten. I have a strong indication of connections in another half dozen.

The benefit of having 3000 DNA relatives is the information they are willing to share. If they supply ancestral surnames and locations this will become a valuable genealogical tool. In my case I'm having to search Irish parish records and I might have three or four possible matches with the main ancestral line. I can do a search of my 3000 relatives to see which of the three or four possible maiden names pop up as names supplied by DNA relatives. If I have none or if I have six or seven of one name that is a useful piece of information. I may not have the individuals pinned down but I have more confidence in searching one direction rather than another.

Some researchers won't have an opportunity to do even the most basic research. I have a number of adoptees among my DNA relatives who have little or no information. As a male, I can at least tell them if they match my X chromosome and are related to me through my mother (females can't). In that case I can supply maternal family names that might help.
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Old 05-19-2018, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,242 posts, read 30,096,296 times
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I have two lines that I am hoping YDNA will eventually help with brick walls. One of those is very likely a nonpaternal event.

Ysearch at least provided a list of people known to be related in those lines, though just how has not yet been demonstrable by comparing paper trails. I will just print out the info so I can have it, even though finding new YDNA matches will be more cumbersome.
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Old 05-19-2018, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Ohio
21,281 posts, read 15,078,410 times
Reputation: 17713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
One eternal source of amusement for me are the census records. Seems my ancestors told some real whoppers in between being semi-factual, and the poor census taker either believed them, misheard them, or just didn't care enough to put it down correctly.

If you examine census forms from 1850 onward, there's usually a mark that identifies the respondent. Often it is an "X" in a circle. Then as now, respondents are supposed to be 16 years or older.


Don't forget that many people were uneducated or received little education and so couldn't even spell their own names. That's especially true of women, who were overwhelmingly most likely to be the respondents.


Even in the 1930s women were married at age 14 or 15, and only went to school as far as the 4th or maybe 6th Grade, before staying home to help with the farm or run the household.


Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeIsWhere... View Post
And yes, I have come across ancestors living in two different states during the same time frame so I am still 'chasing' down the discrepancy in that one.

Genealogy requires you to learn some history and geography.


Some States were created out of other States, like Tennessee out of North Carolina, and West Virginia and Kentucky out of Virginia. I have ancestors born in that part of Virginia that later became Kentucky.


North Carolina and South Carolina had a history of animosity, and their borders changed several times before being permanently established.


Some States permitted the creation of new counties from existing counties, and that's especially true for Virginia and Kentucky.



It's also quite possible you're chasing two different people. A birth date is your best friend, and that's person's mother is your second best friend.


It's very rare for two people with the same name to have identical birth dates.


Also, up through the 1970s, it wasn't uncommon for people in the South to travel to Ohio or Michigan for work. They would maintain a home in Tennessee or Kentucky, then work for a year or two in Ohio or Michigan, often in the auto industry and then go home and live off that money for 5 or 6 years.
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