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Old 05-10-2018, 06:18 AM
 
7,153 posts, read 3,976,367 times
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My Great-Grandma came to the US as a young girl. Her Dad became a citizen a few years after they arrived. Great-Grandpa (her husband) never did.

Doing research, I found in her Naturalization request that she claimed the above. She did this when she was an elderly Widow. Apparently, Great-Grandpa didn't want her either to become a citizen.

I never heard of such a thing using a naturalized parent to claim citizenship. Was this common for women back in the day (early 20th Century)? Interesting the things you find out doing genealogy!
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Old 05-10-2018, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Children were typically automatically naturalized if they were minors when their father naturalized, so yes, this was common for both men and women.
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Old 05-10-2018, 09:51 PM
 
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Prior to 1922 if a female (native born or naturalized) married a man who was not a citizen of the U.S. than the wife lost her U.S. citizenship upon marriage.

My hubby's grandmother was born in New York in 1884. She married grandfather (who was not a U.S. citizen.) In the 1930's she applied for U.S. citizenship, and her naturalization papers clearly state that she was born in New York City.

Also, prior to 1922, if a female non-citizen married a U.S. citizen than she automatically became a U.S. citizen without ever acquiring naturalization papers of her own.
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daliowa View Post
Prior to 1922 if a female (native born or naturalized) married a man who was not a citizen of the U.S. than the wife lost her U.S. citizenship upon marriage.
That was only marriages which took place between 1907 and 1922, not before 1922 entirely.

https://www.archives.gov/files/publi...itizenship.pdf
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Old 05-11-2018, 10:34 AM
 
768 posts, read 579,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daliowa View Post
Prior to 1922 if a female (native born or naturalized) married a man who was not a citizen of the U.S. than the wife lost her U.S. citizenship upon marriage.

My hubby's grandmother was born in New York in 1884. She married grandfather (who was not a U.S. citizen.) In the 1930's she applied for U.S. citizenship, and her naturalization papers clearly state that she was born in New York City.

Also, prior to 1922, if a female non-citizen married a U.S. citizen than she automatically became a U.S. citizen without ever acquiring naturalization papers of her own.
This.
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Old 05-11-2018, 11:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
That was only marriages which took place between 1907 and 1922, not before 1922 entirely.

https://www.archives.gov/files/publi...itizenship.pdf

Thanks!
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Old 05-13-2018, 12:53 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 1,246,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo48 View Post
My Great-Grandma came to the US as a young girl. Her Dad became a citizen a few years after they arrived. Great-Grandpa (her husband) never did.

Doing research, I found in her Naturalization request that she claimed the above. She did this when she was an elderly Widow. Apparently, Great-Grandpa didn't want her either to become a citizen.

I never heard of such a thing using a naturalized parent to claim citizenship. Was this common for women back in the day (early 20th Century)? Interesting the things you find out doing genealogy!
Genealogy is fun, educational, and teaches history.

What country did your family emigrate from?


Reasons for not naturalizing:
1. When applying for US naturalization British immigrants were forced to renounce their allegiance to the Queen. To a loyalist that is sacrilege. It is possible your great grandparents were of the kind.
2. After an immigrant pulls up stakes in their motherland and reach their new home
there is a homesickness that lasts a lifetime. Some folks cradle a dream to return to the old country when things get better over there. So they feel the need to hold on to their old country citizenship (passports) in case they would return to the old country some day. The homesickness I mention is called the Ulysses Syndrome and can be passed on to descendants through modeled behaviors. See quote below.

Wikipedia: [quote] Ulysses Syndrome (Immigrant Syndrome of Chronic and Multiple Stress) is an atypical set of depressive, anxious, dissociative, and somatoform symptoms that results from being exposed to extreme levels of stress unique to the process of modern migration.[1] Rather than a mental disorder, this syndrome is a natural reaction to toxic levels of stress seen in migrants who are otherwise in normal mental health [unquote]
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