U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-12-2018, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
630 posts, read 250,990 times
Reputation: 406

Advertisements

So me, my dad, my brother, and my paternal grandfather were all planning on taking a Y-DNA Test to see where our direct Male ancestors come from. Would we all be the same haplogroup? Or could we have different areas? It is confirmed that we all all related through AncestryDNA, we just wanted to test the male line.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-12-2018, 10:23 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
8,185 posts, read 4,476,416 times
Reputation: 15458
Unless there is some non-parental fluke the male paternal line should have the same haplogroup. You already documented that you are related so I would think that one test would be sufficient. Did AncestryDNA identify your paternal haplogroup?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2018, 04:07 PM
 
3,494 posts, read 5,154,299 times
Reputation: 5206
Then your grandfather is the only one you should test. You won't gain anything new by testing his descendants. Take the Family Tree DNA Y-37 test for starters. That will give you a haplogroup for ancient ancestry, and can be used to match to other people who have tested who may be related to you with the same surname. Depending on those results you may want to upgrade to higher markers. But by all means don't waste the money on testing yourself, your brother or your father. Always test the person from the earliest generation still living.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2018, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 540,843 times
Reputation: 787
You are testing your great grandpa, and his great grandpa as well all the way to 1,000 years/
Remember this.
My Y-DNA is: R1b1b2a1a2f*
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2018, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,267 posts, read 14,330,048 times
Reputation: 12085
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boss1234 View Post
So me, my dad, my brother, and my paternal grandfather were all planning on taking a Y-DNA Test to see where our direct Male ancestors come from. Would we all be the same haplogroup? Or could we have different areas? It is confirmed that we all all related through AncestryDNA, we just wanted to test the male line.
There is generally no point in more than one male (in the same direct paternal line) in the immediate family taking the Y-DNA test. Mutations only happen every so often so it's unlikely there was a mutation within the three generations you're thinking about testing. So not only would you all have the same haplogroup but you will likely all have the same Y matches too. Basically, unless there was a mutation within those three generations (which is possible, but not likely), you will all get the exact same results, and considering how expensive the Y-DNA test is, that would be a big waste of money to test all four of you. I would test your paternal grandfather, and that should be sufficient. If you're really concerned there could have been a recent mutation, test your grandfather and yourself but I wouldn't spend more than that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2018, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
630 posts, read 250,990 times
Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Then your grandfather is the only one you should test. You won't gain anything new by testing his descendants. Take the Family Tree DNA Y-37 test for starters. That will give you a haplogroup for ancient ancestry, and can be used to match to other people who have tested who may be related to you with the same surname. Depending on those results you may want to upgrade to higher markers. But by all means don't waste the money on testing yourself, your brother or your father. Always test the person from the earliest generation still living.
Well, the reason we want to test, is cause my paternal grandfather's biological father, my great grandfather who would also be on the Y-Chromosome Line died when my paternal grandfather was 5 years old, and my great grandma got remarried and they changed my grandpa's surname, so we know absolutely nothing about that side of the family other than the matches from that side on ancestry, but we wanted to see where the Male side on that line comes from.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2018, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,267 posts, read 14,330,048 times
Reputation: 12085
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boss1234 View Post
Well, the reason we want to test, is cause my paternal grandfather's biological father, my great grandfather who would also be on the Y-Chromosome Line died when my paternal grandfather was 5 years old, and my great grandma got remarried and they changed my grandpa's surname, so we know absolutely nothing about that side of the family other than the matches from that side on ancestry, but we wanted to see where the Male side on that line comes from.
Then having your paternal grandfather take the Y-DNA test alone will be fine. Testing the rest of you won't benefit you in this regard at all, and would be a huge waste of money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2018, 12:01 PM
 
3,494 posts, read 5,154,299 times
Reputation: 5206
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Then having your paternal grandfather take the Y-DNA test alone will be fine. Testing the rest of you won't benefit you in this regard at all, and would be a huge waste of money.
Agreed. The grandfather's Y chromosome is passed down to his sons and their sons so you would all have the same one with the same haplogroup inherited from his biological father's line. There is no advantage to testing your grandfather's sons/grandsons. You will be using your grandfather's Y to match to people with his original surname.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2018, 06:52 AM
 
9,296 posts, read 5,541,547 times
Reputation: 9554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boss1234 View Post
Well, the reason we want to test, is cause my paternal grandfather's biological father, my great grandfather who would also be on the Y-Chromosome Line died when my paternal grandfather was 5 years old, and my great grandma got remarried and they changed my grandpa's surname, so we know absolutely nothing about that side of the family other than the matches from that side on ancestry, but we wanted to see where the Male side on that line comes from.

but all the results going to be identical, it be like taking six test paying for six test with a sheet of carbon paper. the only different going be the id at top of page

you dont have to test your grandfather, any of the males going be the same
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2018, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,267 posts, read 14,330,048 times
Reputation: 12085
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownbagg View Post
you dont have to test your grandfather, any of the males going be the same
Well, not necessarily. All of the males are likely to have the same Y-DNA unchanged, but there is a small chance a mutation happened in one of the more recent generations. It is not likely to have happened, but it could have - I recently saw a case where a son had a more specific haplogroup sub-clade than his father, because there was a new mutation with the son that the father didn't have. It can happen at any time, in any generation.

So if the grandfather is willing and able to do the test, I would recommend testing him. Only if it's going to be a inconvenience to test him or something would I consider testing his son instead. Even if there is a new mutation with the son, you can still make use of it - it would just mean the son would have a greater genetic distance with the Y matches than the father would.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:41 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top