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Old 05-18-2018, 05:31 AM
 
635 posts, read 434,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZgarden View Post
Wondering if this is true? Why should I keep looking for my ancestor who came from England in the volumes of naturalization records then?
I read on a Philadelphia website that Brits were subjects of the King and they were going to the King's land (America) so no naturalization was necessary. Really????

You're obviously researching pre-1776. No one was nationalized or given immigration papers, including people who were not British. We had free and open borders. In fact, some members of my family border-hopped back and forth between the US and Canada in the 1600's and 1700s. A few branches of my family are still in Canada to this day, but the majority of us became Americans.
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Old 05-18-2018, 07:46 AM
 
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Naturalization wasn't really common until the 1900s.

I have some English ancestors who came to America in the 1870s. I've never found any naturalization paperwork, but I have some immigration info on them in regards to the ship they came over on and the ship's manifest.

I also had a group of ancestors who moved to Canada between 1840-1860 most of them and/or their descendants came back after the Civil War and they never had to be naturalized either. Some came back in the 1890s and some - cousins who were born in the 1900s came to America with extended family in the 1920s and I've never found anything about them being naturalized either. But not totally sure on if that was required for Canadians either. Many of my newfound cousins (we talk on social media) - their grandparents were born in Canada and moved to the US between 1920 and 1940.
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Old 05-18-2018, 10:44 AM
 
5,216 posts, read 4,521,924 times
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Oaths of allegiance (loyalty oaths made by men) were recorded after the revolutionary war & civil war. The ones I've seen were state records. Maybe they were recorded as polling records at other times. Look for them at state record depositories.
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:45 AM
 
Location: London
4,480 posts, read 3,887,999 times
Reputation: 2093
Interesting:
"In 1783, the Paris peace treaty was signed. This treaty identifies the King of England as the prince of the United States contradicting the belief that America won the war of independence. And although King George III of England gave up most claims over his American colonies, he kept his right to continue receiving payments for his business ventures of colonizing America. If America won the war of independence, why would the agree to pay reparations to the king."

When the 13th amendment to the constitution was passed, the U.S. president was made subservient to the King of England. The 13th Amendment (the title of nobility amendment) forbids U.S. officials from using royal titles like king, or prince. For some strange reason though, the 13th amendment which was ratified in 1810 no longer appears in current copies of the U.S. constitution.

https://mainerepublicemailalert.com/...-roman-empire/

Last edited by John-UK; 07-10-2018 at 11:08 AM..
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
5,259 posts, read 8,462,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
"In 1783, the Paris peace treaty was signed. This treaty identifies the King of England as the prince of the United States contradicting the belief that America won the war of independence. And although King George III of England gave up most claims over his American colonies, he kept his right to continue receiving payments for his business ventures of colonizing America. If America won the war of independence, why would the agree to pay reparations to the king."
https://mainerepublicemailalert.com/...-roman-empire/
https://www.quora.com/Why-was-King-G...reaty-of-Paris
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Old 07-11-2018, 03:35 AM
 
Location: London
4,480 posts, read 3,887,999 times
Reputation: 2093
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
That guy answering wrote; "The Federal Reserve System and its member banks are owned entirely by the government of the United States.". Which is wrong. The Fed is a private bank.
The Federal Reserve Banks are not a part of the federal government, but they exist because of an act of Congress. ... While the Board of Governors is an independent government agency, the Federal Reserve Banks are set up like private corporations. Member banks hold stock in the Federal Reserve Banks and earn dividends.
https://www.stlouisfed.org/in-plain-...-reserve-banks

So all the rest I believe? Nah.

Last edited by John-UK; 07-11-2018 at 04:19 AM..
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,766 posts, read 8,399,066 times
Reputation: 13723
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
Interesting:
"In 1783, the Paris peace treaty was signed. This treaty identifies the King of England as the prince of the United States contradicting the belief that America won the war of independence. And although King George III of England gave up most claims over his American colonies, he kept his right to continue receiving payments for his business ventures of colonizing America. If America won the war of independence, why would the agree to pay reparations to the king."

When the 13th amendment to the constitution was passed, the U.S. president was made subservient to the King of England. The 13th Amendment (the title of nobility amendment) forbids U.S. officials from using royal titles like king, or prince. For some strange reason though, the 13th amendment which was ratified in 1810 no longer appears in current copies of the U.S. constitution.

https://mainerepublicemailalert.com/...-roman-empire/

The copy of The Constitution that I have in hand has an Amendment XIII, ratified December 6, 1865, that outlaws slavery and "involuntary servitude" except as punishment for crime, when duly convicted.


The 1917 edition of Marshall's Handy Manual has the same Amendment, word for word.


I used to have an American History textbook dated 1868 (IIRC). If I can find it, I'll see what it has for an Amendment XIII.
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:51 AM
 
16,209 posts, read 8,497,797 times
Reputation: 8337
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
Interesting:
"In 1783, the Paris peace treaty was signed. This treaty identifies the King of England as the prince of the United States contradicting the belief that America won the war of independence. And although King George III of England gave up most claims over his American colonies, he kept his right to continue receiving payments for his business ventures of colonizing America. If America won the war of independence, why would the agree to pay reparations to the king."

When the 13th amendment to the constitution was passed, the U.S. president was made subservient to the King of England. The 13th Amendment (the title of nobility amendment) forbids U.S. officials from using royal titles like king, or prince. For some strange reason though, the 13th amendment which was ratified in 1810 no longer appears in current copies of the U.S. constitution.

https://mainerepublicemailalert.com/...-roman-empire/

The 13th amendment was not ratified in 1810.....


And the blog you cited looks like a lot of mumbo jumbo. Hope if you're in the UK you're not basing your knowledge of American governmental history on it.



Note that I am from NW Ohio and our representative in Congress - James Ashley was one of the sponsors of the 13th Amendment. He was born in 1824...
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Old 07-11-2018, 01:51 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,655 posts, read 9,130,944 times
Reputation: 7977
The "Titles of Nobility Amendment", proposed in 1810, was never ratified by enough States. FWIW, it still could be.
And there were copies of the Constitution printed with it, in error.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles...Misconceptions
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Old 07-11-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,766 posts, read 8,399,066 times
Reputation: 13723
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
The "Titles of Nobility Amendment", proposed in 1810, was never ratified by enough States. FWIW, it still could be.
And there were copies of the Constitution printed with it, in error.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles...Misconceptions

While it is true that no time limit was imposed by Congress for the ratification of the 1810 13th Amendment, at the present time it would require ratification by 26 more states to become part of the Constitution. Since few people today see it as a needed amendment that would serve any useful purpose, that is very unlikely.
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