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Old 07-18-2018, 05:12 PM
 
3,820 posts, read 5,516,816 times
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A few months ago the Golden State Killer was identified using DNA and genetic genealogy. Now it made the news that the case of April Tinsley, a girl sexually assaulted and killed in Indiana in 1988, was solved using similar methods by genetic genealogist CeCe Moore, the founder of DNA Detectives and chief genealogist for Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s PBS show, "Finding Your Roots."

CeCe Moore had earlier said she wouldn't help law enforcement but now has changed her position after the Golden State Killer was found:

"Over the years, she received inquiries from law enforcement departments asking if she could help with criminal cases. She always declined, she said, because she didn’t believe it would be right to track down criminals using DNA data that people had uploaded to a family history database without knowing the data was being used by law enforcement agencies.

"Her viewpoint changed in April after the arrest of a man suspected of being the Golden State Killer who was wanted for several murders and a string of rapes in California.

"News coverage reported extensively that he had been identified by genetic genealogy research using the free, open-source GEDmatch genealogy database, Moore said. The operators of GEDmatch then changed their terms of service to let users know their data could be checked by law enforcement personnel."


http://www.news-sentinel.com/news/lo...in-cold-cases/

This is just the tip of the iceberg, apparently many more cold cases are now going to be processed by Parabon NanoLabs in Reston, Va., and uploaded to GEDmatch in hopes of identifying criminals.
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Old 07-18-2018, 07:05 PM
 
2,686 posts, read 3,256,350 times
Reputation: 3023
Default Double homicide from 1987 in Washington State

Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
This is just the tip of the iceberg, apparently many more cold cases are now going to be processed by Parabon NanoLabs in Reston, Va., and uploaded to GEDmatch in hopes of identifying criminals.

Tip of the iceberg it is.

This below is the 3rd story I have heard about in the media regarding DNA and finding murder suspects in cold cases. This additional recent story in May 2018 out of Washington state did not get the attention that the Golden State murderer had just a bit earlier this year. The suspect in a double-murder of 2 Canadians in 1987 was located due to DNA research as well.

Seattle man arrested in connection with 1987 slayings of B.C. high school sweethearts
DNA genealogy match leads to arrest in double homicide of Tanya van Cuylenborg and Jay Cook


A 55-year-old Seattle-area man has been arrested in the cold case double homicide of a young B.C. couple who were killed in Washington state more than 30 years ago.

William Earl Talbott II was taken into custody after a DNA test came back as a positive match to DNA collected from the crime scene more than three decades ago. His bail has been set at $2 million US.

Tanya van Cuylenborg, 18, and Jay Cook, 20, both of Saanich, B.C., were last seen alive on Nov. 18, 1987. Their bodies were found within days of their disappearance, and police had been baffled by the case ever since.
- click link to read the rest.
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Old 07-18-2018, 07:16 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
39,022 posts, read 25,745,934 times
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Hopefully they'll keep solving these cases, finding these old a-holes and holding them accountable! Interesting how many neighbors or acquaintances interviewed say, he was always angry, shouting and cursing. Sociopaths. Angry entitled-feeling sociopaths. Lock 'em up and throw away the key.
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Old 07-18-2018, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
6,420 posts, read 5,121,932 times
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If it puts guilty parties behind bars when they've gone years as free people, then I say GOOD!!

Why should these criminals be walking around free? Lock them up no matter what their age is.
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Old 07-19-2018, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Forest bathing
2,549 posts, read 1,532,351 times
Reputation: 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by maus View Post
Tip of the iceberg it is.

This below is the 3rd story I have heard about in the media regarding DNA and finding murder suspects in cold cases. This additional recent story in May 2018 out of Washington state did not get the attention that the Golden State murderer had just a bit earlier this year. The suspect in a double-murder of 2 Canadians in 1987 was located due to DNA research as well.

Seattle man arrested in connection with 1987 slayings of B.C. high school sweethearts
DNA genealogy match leads to arrest in double homicide of Tanya van Cuylenborg and Jay Cook


A 55-year-old Seattle-area man has been arrested in the cold case double homicide of a young B.C. couple who were killed in Washington state more than 30 years ago.

William Earl Talbott II was taken into custody after a DNA test came back as a positive match to DNA collected from the crime scene more than three decades ago. His bail has been set at $2 million US.

Tanya van Cuylenborg, 18, and Jay Cook, 20, both of Saanich, B.C., were last seen alive on Nov. 18, 1987. Their bodies were found within days of their disappearance, and police had been baffled by the case ever since.
- click link to read the rest.
The road that the woman was discovered on isnt too far from where we live. I was a SAHM with a baby and I was truly afraid. I an so glad that this technology is available. RIP to all the victims. Now, their famulies can maybe find some solace. And, maybe, other crimes may be solved.
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Old 07-24-2018, 09:30 AM
 
Location: NJ
15,604 posts, read 24,495,672 times
Reputation: 15347
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
A few months ago the Golden State Killer was identified using DNA and genetic genealogy. Now it made the news that the case of April Tinsley, a girl sexually assaulted and killed in Indiana in 1988, was solved using similar methods by genetic genealogist CeCe Moore, the founder of DNA Detectives and chief genealogist for Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s PBS show, "Finding Your Roots."

CeCe Moore had earlier said she wouldn't help law enforcement but now has changed her position after the Golden State Killer was found:

"Over the years, she received inquiries from law enforcement departments asking if she could help with criminal cases. She always declined, she said, because she didn’t believe it would be right to track down criminals using DNA data that people had uploaded to a family history database without knowing the data was being used by law enforcement agencies.

"Her viewpoint changed in April after the arrest of a man suspected of being the Golden State Killer who was wanted for several murders and a string of rapes in California.

"News coverage reported extensively that he had been identified by genetic genealogy research using the free, open-source GEDmatch genealogy database, Moore said. The operators of GEDmatch then changed their terms of service to let users know their data could be checked by law enforcement personnel."


http://www.news-sentinel.com/news/lo...in-cold-cases/

This is just the tip of the iceberg, apparently many more cold cases are now going to be processed by Parabon NanoLabs in Reston, Va., and uploaded to GEDmatch in hopes of identifying criminals.
I'm not surprised CeCe changed her mind.

Has anyone seen if Parabon will be doing Doe DNA like DNA Doe Project? If they do, I wonder if they'll do kids because DNA Doe Project said they won't do kids because family is usually the ones responsible for their deaths. People have asked if they can do one case of a 3-6 year old little boy known as Boy In The Box found in Philly, February 25, 1957. With his case being so old, chances are his parents are long dead so they appear to be considering it.

I have a great case for Parabon; an age 8 to 11 African American little girl was found headless in St. Louis, MO. Here is the link to her album. One of my friends took a forensic art class a few months ago, someone from Parabon was there, they said funding is available for some cases so my friend called her LE. Hopefully we'll see a recon done from her DNA. It's the only way we'll have an idea of what she looked like.

I sent Parabon an email yesterday to ask if they're gonna take on Doe and kid cases, so we'll see. I hope they do. There's so many out there that both DNA Doe Project and Parabon can be busy for years.
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