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Old 11-15-2020, 05:34 AM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
When did she apply? The Social Security administration was started in 1935. At that time, my grandmother was a working single mother, so she applied. Many women didn't apply then, because they were not employed.

And it's likely that the required paperwork was not as stringent as it later became. If you peruse the section of the Social Security website that collects the most popular names for each birth year, you can see that in the early years, many people applied with their nickname instead of their full first name: Jim, Ed, Tom.

Yes, I know it's possible for someone to have been officially named Jim, Ed or Tom. However, if you compare studies on popular names which have been made from official birth records, such nicknames are not anywhere near as common as they are in the Social Security records. In other words, applicants must not have been required to present a birth certificate that matched the same name they were applying under.
How old are you? I'm 55. When I was 15 in 1980, a social security card was required if you worked. We did not have to provide any documents when applying, I actually think it was my dad who applied for mine. Mine was not in my given name Susan, it said Sue M last name. I've never gone by Susan. I remember because at some point, they had rules where you did have to provide documents, I had to get my social security card changed to my legal name. It was between 1985 and 1993 that documents became required.

My son was born in 1985, back then it was not required to get a social when born unless the child had a bank account. I was given the social form at the hospital. I had to hand in the birth certificate app before I left. My daughter was born in 1993, by then we had to fill in the social security app before we left the hospital.

Someone I know that was born in the late 50's was able to change their whole name a few times without filing any paper work. You can see the history on the SSDI. Her 1st name was right when she applied for it, then she must have applied for welfare when she had her 1st child; it shows she dropped a letter which gave her a new 1st name. When she had her 2nd child, she decided to start using the last name of the father of her kids.
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Old 11-15-2020, 09:53 AM
 
10,113 posts, read 6,222,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
How old are you? I'm 55. When I was 15 in 1980, a social security card was required if you worked. We did not have to provide any documents when applying, I actually think it was my dad who applied for mine. Mine was not in my given name Susan, it said Sue M last name. I've never gone by Susan. I remember because at some point, they had rules where you did have to provide documents, I had to get my social security card changed to my legal name. It was between 1985 and 1993 that documents became required.

My son was born in 1985, back then it was not required to get a social when born unless the child had a bank account. I was given the social form at the hospital. I had to hand in the birth certificate app before I left. My daughter was born in 1993, by then we had to fill in the social security app before we left the hospital.

Someone I know that was born in the late 50's was able to change their whole name a few times without filing any paper work. You can see the history on the SSDI. Her 1st name was right when she applied for it, then she must have applied for welfare when she had her 1st child; it shows she dropped a letter which gave her a new 1st name. When she had her 2nd child, she decided to start using the last name of the father of her kids.
Interesting to read about the changes over time. I'm 51. Three of my older siblings and I all got SS cards at the same time because the oldest was starting to work. I think she would have been about 16, so the rest of us were 13, 10, and 7 (me) which would make this around 1976. My mom applied for all of us and we have consecutive SS numbers. But she did put our full names on the cards, not our nicknames.

I also recall sending in documentation for a new SS card with my married name, after I got married. And I applied for cards for all of my children right after birth (the oldest was born in 1999).
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Old 11-15-2020, 01:28 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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My "official" hand written birth certificate has my middle name misspelled and then written over with a correction so it is sort of jumbled. I guess I have my pick?
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Old 11-15-2020, 05:25 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
. . . I think that's just how it was back then. My MIL born in the US in 1937 has a middle name Rose but when she married, her maiden name or initial of became her middle name. Her mother in law, Margaret Mary, "Peg", born in 1907 was known as Mrs. J.D. last name until she passed away in 2015, 6 days shy of her 108th birthday. Her address labels or envelopes always said Mrs. J.D. last name.

Back when I married my ex, I had asked MIL why gram went by Mrs. J.D. since her husband had been deceased 20 years at that point. She said that's what she preferred and to make sure that's how I addressed any mail to her so that I didn't disrespect her. . .
Thinking the information just wasn't known I recently got a lady's name changed on findagrave from Mrs. Husband's Initials MarriedLastname to her First Middle Maiden MarriedLastname. Wherever she is I hope she doesn't feel disrespected.
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Old 11-15-2020, 05:32 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I have some ancestors who had middle initials with no documentation of what they stood for, but a middle name is widely accepted as the actual name. This makes me wonder if the name was someone's guess and then was widely copied, and if it could be wrong. For example, "James C. ____" is said to be "James Christopher ____" but there is no proof. There is nobody named Christopher in the family.

There are lots of examples of "presidential" or historic names, my ancestor "Benjamin F. ___" was assumed to be "Benjamin Franklin _____". But I have known of other instances where similar names were proven wrong, where "George W. ____" was assumed to be "George Washington _____" but later turned out to be "George Wilfred _____".
True, it's hard to know how many names are just accepted then copied. Often a middle initial of an oldest male matching the initial of his mother's maiden name can mean his middle name is her maiden name. Or there are traditional naming patterns that can help, but can be inconclusive. I notice in the era of large families after usually naming kids after themselves, parents and grandparents, then they often name kids after their siblings. That can give us a hint. It can be really tempting to think we know, but unless we see a document from their life or a close relative's the actual name, if found, can be unexpected.
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Old 11-15-2020, 08:29 PM
 
488 posts, read 159,006 times
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My husband's g-grandfather was Henry F. [surname]. No where is it recorded what F is. He became a prominent man in his town and had newspaper articles written about him. Always with just the middle initial F. Awards, certificates, his obituary, even a commemorative cup with only F. His mother's maiden name began with F and he was the first born son so it's assumed but not actually known.

My g-grandmother's middle name was actually just the letter V, not V. just V
My mother who was named after her changed it to Vee because 20th c. identification documents wouldn't accept the letter V as a middle name.
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Old 11-16-2020, 06:14 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyandPearl View Post
My husband's g-grandfather was Henry F. [surname]. No where is it recorded what F is. He became a prominent man in his town and had newspaper articles written about him. Always with just the middle initial F. Awards, certificates, his obituary, even a commemorative cup with only F. His mother's maiden name began with F and he was the first born son so it's assumed but not actually known.

My g-grandmother's middle name was actually just the letter V, not V. just V
My mother who was named after her changed it to Vee because 20th c. identification documents wouldn't accept the letter V as a middle name.
Like John Dee Smith and Robert Jay Jones.

It's unfortunate not to know for certain, but you're probably right: it probably is the mother's maiden name.
Don't you wish someone somewhere had written it down?
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Old 11-16-2020, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
30,617 posts, read 32,987,075 times
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My dad, born in 1922, did not care for his first name and was always called by his middle name or a shortened version of it. When he joined the Navy during WWII he tried to ditch the first name altogether, enlisting as (Middle Name) (No Middle Initial) (Last Name). After he came home from the war he just switched his first and middle names and used the initial for his original first name. At least we always knew what the original first name is.
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Old 11-16-2020, 07:39 PM
 
13,633 posts, read 22,268,460 times
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Some mini factoids — My husband only went by his middle name. His grandfather did not have a middle name but a middle initial.

I knew a guy who is named Richard Matthew and went by his middle name. Turns out the reason he went by his middle name is he had four brothers and they were all named Richard and went by their middle names.

My dad’s middle name was the month he was born in. As was his Dad’s, and a number of boys in the family, all born in August. Apparently it was cold in November where they lived, because there were a lot of August babies.

And then there’s the joke. I saw it first done by Henry Cho but it is a very old joke. He claimed it was his wife’s grandfather, serving in World War II. They were from the south. And the man’s name was R B Jones. The army was not set up for that. He didn’t get his pay one week because they couldn’t figure out a name. People have names, not initials. His commanding officers were giving him grief. So he filled out some new paperwork and he said R(only) B(only) Jones.

Apparently that made them happy at headquarters, but now when everybody called him, they called him Ronly Bonly Jones.
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Old 11-18-2020, 05:16 AM
 
Location: NJ
15,557 posts, read 24,477,936 times
Reputation: 15302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
Some mini factoids — My husband only went by his middle name. His grandfather did not have a middle name but a middle initial.

I knew a guy who is named Richard Matthew and went by his middle name. Turns out the reason he went by his middle name is he had four brothers and they were all named Richard and went by their middle names.

My dad’s middle name was the month he was born in. As was his Dad’s, and a number of boys in the family, all born in August. Apparently it was cold in November where they lived, because there were a lot of August babies.

And then there’s the joke. I saw it first done by Henry Cho but it is a very old joke. He claimed it was his wife’s grandfather, serving in World War II. They were from the south. And the man’s name was R B Jones. The army was not set up for that. He didn’t get his pay one week because they couldn’t figure out a name. People have names, not initials. His commanding officers were giving him grief. So he filled out some new paperwork and he said R(only) B(only) Jones.

Apparently that made them happy at headquarters, but now when everybody called him, they called him Ronly Bonly Jones.
LMAO! I knew you were gonna say they called him Ronly Bonly Jones lol
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