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Old 02-15-2021, 06:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
I've noticed a lot of people used to switch their first and middle names. They could just make the change and move forward. Now they'd probably have to get it changed legally.
I have a relative that has always gone by his middle name. I assume it was because his first name was the same as his dad's (and this way there was no confusion between the two).
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Old 02-21-2021, 03:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Neither of my parents have middle names. I guess they're not popular in Hungary. ...

My 2nd MIL born in Germany to Polish parents was not given a middle name at birth. Her 1st name was Klara. ...

In some countries middle name is always father's first name, even for women

I know that you are into DNA and genealogy - see if it helps sometimes, hopefully

According to this article, patronymics were used in Hungary, not sure if it could be used in people of Polish descent too?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patronymic

Last edited by Nik4me; 02-21-2021 at 03:37 PM..
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Old 02-22-2021, 04:33 AM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
In some countries middle name is always father's first name, even for women

I know that you are into DNA and genealogy - see if it helps sometimes, hopefully

According to this article, patronymics were used in Hungary, not sure if it could be used in people of Polish descent too?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patronymic
Thanks, I'll keep it in mind if I run into it.

All I've found so far as that Hungarian men go by V. first name last name. My uncle isn't sure what V stands for, probably like Mr.

I know my grandmother, his mother, was buried under a female version of my grandfather's name even though they were divorced since my dad and his brother were teenagers. I was really surprised when my uncle sent me a pic of her burial plot.

On my mothers fathers side, some of his siblings got a different spelling last name. I had wondered if it was a male/female thing because my mothers was spelled different then my grandfathers but it wasn't because his brothers who came to the US also had the same spelling as my mother. I think it was just a spelling mistake when the birth was recorded.
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Old 02-22-2021, 06:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Thanks, I'll keep it in mind if I run into it.

All I've found so far as that Hungarian men go by V. first name last name. My uncle isn't sure what V stands for, probably like Mr.

I know my grandmother, his mother, was buried under a female version of my grandfather's name even though they were divorced since my dad and his brother were teenagers. I was really surprised when my uncle sent me a pic of her burial plot.

On my mothers fathers side, some of his siblings got a different spelling last name. I had wondered if it was a male/female thing because my mothers was spelled different then my grandfathers but it wasn't because his brothers who came to the US also had the same spelling as my mother. I think it was just a spelling mistake when the birth was recorded.
My grandfather was born in Hungary. When he came to the USA as a child, his school teacher decided he needed an English sounding name which became his legal first name.. Therefore his Hungarian name became his middle name. (As far he didn't have a middle name prior and nor did his Hungarian relatives.)

In Russian married women's last names are different than their husbands as there is an extra sound (syllable) added the man's last name to make it feminine for their wives.
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Old 02-23-2021, 06:05 AM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
My grandfather was born in Hungary. When he came to the USA as a child, his school teacher decided he needed an English sounding name which became his legal first name.. Therefore his Hungarian name became his middle name. (As far he didn't have a middle name prior and nor did his Hungarian relatives.)

In Russian married women's last names are different than their husbands as there is an extra sound (syllable) added the man's last name to make it feminine for their wives.
Back in the good old days when a person could change their name without going to court lol

My dad was 20 when he came. He just Americanized his 1st name which is a very common name here.
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Old 02-25-2021, 09:27 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Some people didn't have a middle name. If you're not finding one recorded anywhere on any record, maybe it's because they didn't have one. In some cultures (I think German is one of the exceptions), middle names weren't very common before the late 18th century (I think around the 1780s/90s), but even after that point, you can find people who simply didn't have a middle name.
It could be regional. I am well-acquainted with families in Germany from different regions.

For example, a German man born in 1943 in North Rhine Westphalia has a middle name (as do his parents) and a German man born in 1959 in Berlin to East Prussian parents has none.
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Old Today, 04:28 AM
 
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Old time census enumerators don't generally write down a complete name because there is no room on the form they fill out by hand. Initials there can be written as C but it reads like an E. You need government legal registries and marriage licenses/certificates to get the legal names in entirety. Birth certificates or Roman catholic baptism registries will work too.
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