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Old 08-07-2009, 04:00 AM
 
1 posts, read 10,892 times
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budget and penske are less convient than uhaul. uhaul is all over the united states and canada..all the trucks have low decks( made for easy loading) mom attick(good for storing muliple items) budget and penske have frieght tucks..which sucks...the Right equipment at the LOWEST cost.
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Old 08-11-2009, 01:25 AM
 
Location: here and then there...!
947 posts, read 3,162,896 times
Reputation: 596
Hi there!
I am going to jump in here, if I may!?

I will be making a move from Phoenix to LA area in a couple months. I would like to arrange and complete this move to the very best of my ability without burdening others, that being either my dad or my boyfriend-- both busy and out of state...

So,...
I have a motorcycle that I need to load, I have not done that before -- I am sure that I will need and have help to load it and to tie it down, so that is good!

Anyone loaded bikes before?... do you have trick/tips? what is the best way to load it and tie down? what would be the best (if any is better) truck for a bike?

Also,... I have Never driven a truck like this before! I am confident I can do it, but just a little concerned about it. Guess I should drive it a little before I hit the road, get a feel for it and using the mirrors. I am used to driving trucks all my life, but that is like pick up trucks, so I know it is different, but really think that I will be fine.

Any tips on "first timers"!?

Looks like Budget is less costly thus far in my search from Phx to LA...

Thanks!
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Old 08-12-2009, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
1,232 posts, read 3,550,807 times
Reputation: 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by need4Trees View Post
Hi there!
I am going to jump in here, if I may!?

I will be making a move from Phoenix to LA area in a couple months. I would like to arrange and complete this move to the very best of my ability without burdening others, that being either my dad or my boyfriend-- both busy and out of state...

So,...
I have a motorcycle that I need to load, I have not done that before -- I am sure that I will need and have help to load it and to tie it down, so that is good!

Anyone loaded bikes before?... do you have trick/tips? what is the best way to load it and tie down? what would be the best (if any is better) truck for a bike?

Also,... I have Never driven a truck like this before! I am confident I can do it, but just a little concerned about it. Guess I should drive it a little before I hit the road, get a feel for it and using the mirrors. I am used to driving trucks all my life, but that is like pick up trucks, so I know it is different, but really think that I will be fine.

Any tips on "first timers"!?

Looks like Budget is less costly thus far in my search from Phx to LA...

Thanks!
I have found plenty of discount coupons online for Budget. Check them all out when you book the truck as well as negotiate with each Budget business owner. Oftentimes, they will work with you. I have had great experiences with Budget overall.

As for moving a motorcycle... my last move entail pulling a vehicle trailer including my motorcycle in the back of the truck. I've transported motorcycles a lot. Quite simple, actually.

I use tie-down straps bought from a home improvement store. I use four. Two for the front bars. Two to stabilize the back of the bike.

I first place the bike either centered or off-center (depending on the space I need) and use the kickstand to hold the bike up. The bike will lean a bit toward the kickstand, obviously, and away from one side of the truck.

There are usually horizontal wood cross members across the sides of the inside bed of a Budget Truck with vertical metal beams supporting the outer shell at various intervals.

I hook each side of the front bars and each side of the back frame of the bike and let the straps hang down loose, then I lightly connect each strap around each horizontal wood cross-member just ahead of each vertical beam in front of the bike and behind the bike (you will probably end up wrapping the hook and strap around the wood beam and connect the hook back on the incoming strap... I say head of the vertical beam and behind the vertical beam away from the bike so that each strap has some resistance to slippage during the move).

Once each side is loosely connected, I use the come-along on each tie-down to crank the side leaning away from the one side of the truck tight (unless they are the pull type, then I pull them till each strap is snug). The side of the kickstand, I leave a bit of slack since I will want to straighten up the bike and NOT leave the kickstand down once each strap is tightened.

Now, I have a long reach, so I can now on my own (or with the help of a friend) tighten each strap on both sides until they are taught all the while keeping leaning the bike into a vertical position off the kickstand. You'll see that once you tighten each strap while the bike is in the vertical position, that the bike will be fine holding up on its own. But there's one more thing you want to do... create a little more resistance.

You create a little more resistance (again with the help of someone or on your own if you have a long reach or feel comfortable or strong enough to get off the bike and pull each strap) by pushing down a little bit on the front forks and give each of the front straps a few extra cranks. You can do the same for the back. Once you do this, the bike should not be going anywhere. Basically, you have four straps at relatively 30 to 45 degree angles away from each corner of the bike. I've never had a problem with this method.

Word of caution regarding aesthetics... make certain that no straps are touching any paint or chrome. During the move, you may get tiny movements that rub the straps against the frame or paint job. If you make sure while the straps are taught that they aren't touching anything, you should be fine. I always make it a point on the first stop (i.e. gas, bathroom break, etc.) to double check the strapping. After that, no worries.

As for driving a big truck.... well, it can be a bit nerve wracking at first, but just make sure to take it a bit slower at first; give yourself a fair amount of breaking distance; don't tailgate anything; note the height of your truck being cognizant of overhead pass heights; and always give yourself some extra distance between you and the curb when making a right turn (go wide, usually). Before you know it, you'll be driving it with ease. I had driven bigger moving trucks once before moving the truck and trailer across country. I was doing it alone and, at first, I was a extra cautious. By the time I reached Arizona from California, I was in great shape and even backed that whole thing up a few times during my move. Just don't hot dog and just take it easy. Use your mirrors wisely and stay alert. And, for your first time out, you may want to buy the extra waiver insurance, just in case (but make sure they cover overhead issues because sometimes they don't).
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Old 08-12-2009, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Florida
6,262 posts, read 17,984,452 times
Reputation: 4724
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridaballerboy View Post
budget and penske are less convient than uhaul. uhaul is all over the united states and canada..all the trucks have low decks( made for easy loading) mom attick(good for storing muliple items) budget and penske have frieght tucks..which sucks...the Right equipment at the LOWEST cost.
how about the vehicle that will get you there without breaking down.
U-Haul trucks are not reliable--at all. Moving a few miles-maybe.
Longer than that-Penske

U-Haul has places all over run by inept individuals and the trucks are old and not maintained.
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Old 08-12-2009, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Upstate
6,512 posts, read 7,312,380 times
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Like DreamWeavin said, I would pass on U-Haul and go with Penske, Ryder or Budget in that order. Over the years I've rented from all except Budget. Penske and Ryder were the best by far and their prices if you shop around were as good or better the U-Haul.

If you do go with U-Haul, make sure the dealer has new trucks and demand one of those.
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Old 08-12-2009, 10:18 AM
 
Location: here and then there...!
947 posts, read 3,162,896 times
Reputation: 596
Hey Thanks CaliBoy! This helps lots!

I have been pricing Budget, UHaul, Penske
from Phoenix to the South Bay, CA Budget is the cheapest and if it happens to be pretty safe, I'll take it!
Budget:
16ft truck $234 but has a mile limit, which I do not think I will go over at 477.
Penske:
16ft truck $270, No mile limit
UHaul is more than both the above and for only a 14ft truck instead!

No UHaul!

Another question about tying down bike:
I knew not to put on center stand...! and in a trailer prop up bike with out side stand, but I thought (don't know why) if in a truck then use the side stand and tie down from that...? I was thinking that it would be safer to use side stand, keep it down
Oh, and another thought- what is the easiest way to get bike on truck? I am not tall enough to turn it on and steer it up the ramp. A friend that will help me is not much taller than me.
I am thinking to find a high curb or something to assist me with this??

I will look for those online coupons! Great!
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Old 08-12-2009, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
1,232 posts, read 3,550,807 times
Reputation: 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by need4Trees View Post
Hey Thanks CaliBoy! This helps lots!

I have been pricing Budget, UHaul, Penske
from Phoenix to the South Bay, CA Budget is the cheapest and if it happens to be pretty safe, I'll take it!
Budget:
16ft truck $234 but has a mile limit, which I do not think I will go over at 477.
Penske:
16ft truck $270, No mile limit
UHaul is more than both the above and for only a 14ft truck instead!

No UHaul!

Another question about tying down bike:
I knew not to put on center stand...! and in a trailer prop up bike with out side stand, but I thought (don't know why) if in a truck then use the side stand and tie down from that...? I was thinking that it would be safer to use side stand, keep it down
Oh, and another thought- what is the easiest way to get bike on truck? I am not tall enough to turn it on and steer it up the ramp. A friend that will help me is not much taller than me.
I am thinking to find a high curb or something to assist me with this??

I will look for those online coupons! Great!
I don't think you'll go wrong with Penske. They always seem like the trucks moving the fastest up hills when I have driven cross country. Budget has strong trucks, but some of the older (and newer, too) have governors that limit how fast you can drive. I wouldn't recommend exceeding limits, but sometimes you want to get some momentum before you hit a hill and a governor will inhibit your ability to do that. Still, the Budget trucks I have driven (and I have driven a lot) have been slugs up hills. I got used to it, but that was the biggest pain.

The budget trucks I used in the past all had ramps. And my last bike wasn't running at the time, else I would have simply driven it up. High curbs will help. Budget's ramps have a fairly steep incline, especially on the bigger trucks, but if your driveway angles down toward the street, the ramp can be adjusted to more level. However, I recommend having, at least, a second person with you during your first time when loading. I actually turned my bike around in the truck so it was facing the back so that I could ride it out in neutral when I was done with the move.

As for the kickstand, I don't like strapping the bike down as tight as I do with the it down. For two reasons... one, too much pressure and force against the kickstand, along with the bumps of moving, could break it and, two, the kickstand could still release (although doubtful).

When I'm loose tying the straps, I have the kickstand down. But I center the bike when I'm tightening and, then, pushing down on the front handle bars and forks while tightening to really secure the thing. Once I'm done doing that, the bike ain't moving.

However, if you feel more comfortable, I have in the past kept the kickstand down. One benefit to that is when you release the straps. Some people forget they have their kickstand up and when they release the straps, the bike falls (or leans depending on the slack). If you remember you have the kickstand up, then you can get on the bike, release the straps, and drop the kickstand.

The idea is to strap the bike securely using the frame and handle bars as your anchor points. A LOT of bumping goes on in the back of those trucks. A good tying down of the bike will not phase the bike and more than likely, it'll be the only thing that doesn't move in the truck. As I said, been moving motorcycles since I was a child with pops and through adulthood... never a problem with a good set of tie-downs.
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Old 08-17-2009, 12:07 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,380 posts, read 11,249,880 times
Reputation: 2524
Penske for long distance. I used them when I moved from TX to WA and am looking at them on the move back. I was concerned because I had a car on a carrier and was driving mountain passes. It was a brand new truck and diesel. Gas still cost alot, but I got there in one piece. I would use pods if I didn't have a piano to move. Too much shaking and rattling on those freight trucks.
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Old 08-17-2009, 12:42 PM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,194 posts, read 3,837,478 times
Reputation: 756
Default Moved from PA to FL

We used the largest vehicle that we could rent for 5 days. A moving company wanted $17,000 to move our home and we thought it ws crazy high. I drove to Florida 3 times and had fun doing it....Uhaul was expensive so we went to Budget and they were the only agency that would let us take the vehicle out of state....Go figure...We traveled 1,100 miles to Florida to our new home and back to PA 2 week later 3 times.

The first 2 trucks were large and the last one was a panel van around 14' long....The total cost including fuel was $8,300 including unloading and loading fees and the road tolls.

It took us 1.5 days to load 2.5 days to travel and 1 day to unload which I paid 2 neighborhood teenagers $300 to do. It was a very tough move and I would recommend that you recruit friends to load as we did. Our friends worked very hard to load the vehicle in a timely way as anyone can imagine. In return we gave them an open greeting to visit us in Florida as they want.


....
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Old 08-18-2009, 06:03 AM
 
3,646 posts, read 10,130,203 times
Reputation: 5471
We have moved state to state several times.

We have been moved by professionals, used U-pack, U-Haul and Budget.

The professional move was convenient but VERY expensive.

U-Haul/Budget were cheaper, but a pain. Uhaul is less reliable than Budget, but cheaper and the trucks are bigger - the "attic" in the truck would've made a HUGE difference during our last move. Budget's customer service is better - they actually GUARANTEE the availability of the truck you reserve for the day & place you reserve it vs Uhaul's 48 hour/100 mile policy.

U-pack was somewhere in the middle, and the way I'd recommend.
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