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Old 01-28-2020, 02:51 PM
 
6,542 posts, read 3,009,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kab0906 View Post
There are lots of factors, many of which depend on individual circumstance.

But I would say the highest thing we didn't take into consideration when we first moved was traffic. We opted to rent for a year while looking for a house to buy. We scoped several complexes and found one that suited us for square footage and seemed close enough to hubby's workplace. Traffic didn't seem bad, but then we were out looking at midday. 7 am traffic was much, much worse than we realized. What should have been a 20 minute drive turned into an hour or more. By the time we were ready to buy we had a better understanding of traffic difficulties and purchased accordingly.
Good point. One thing anyone can do is get on some map app (I found google best for this) and plot the trip from your potential home to your work. Do it at the morning and evening rush hour or whenever you’d be driving it. It will give you an idea of how good or bad traffic will be.

By the way, this is one of the most helpful threads I’ve seen. Very good information here. Thanks to everyone.
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Old 01-28-2020, 03:40 PM
 
135 posts, read 55,562 times
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VERY good point about traffic. I looked around over a holiday weekend. The house I have my eye on is next to a school. I need to go park the car on that street during school pickup/dropoff and see how busy it is.

Drive the route from your potential new neighborhood to work and see if it's a killer. I need to do the same between the house and where I plan on docking the boat. Thank you, wouldn't have thought of that.

And good point about checking the weather on your move day, particularly with pets (which I'll have). I did a similar oopsie trying to drive a car cross country in the winter with summer shoes (tires on). Got stuck in a traffic jam in WY and couldn't make it up a hill. Ooops.


Good stuff, keep 'em coming!
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Old 01-28-2020, 04:51 PM
 
Location: on the wind
12,934 posts, read 6,459,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TechieTechie View Post
And good point about checking the weather on your move day, particularly with pets (which I'll have). I did a similar oopsie trying to drive a car cross country in the winter with summer shoes (tires on). Got stuck in a traffic jam in WY and couldn't make it up a hill. Ooops.
Actually, you don't wait for move day, you start checking the forecast a few days before and update yourself. Find out how to check road conditions/construction or accident delays along that route (state DOT or police recorded phone message?)
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Old 01-28-2020, 05:19 PM
 
160 posts, read 92,287 times
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I've been looking at google maps about the normal commute times to see what different roads look like.

If you are moving for a new job, make sure you have the right documents handy. Luckily I knew my husband needed a new SS card and got it ordered ahead of time. Now I have a binder with dog vacc records, important docs, etc. That will ride in the car with me.

I also learned to look up how to get a license, register a car, and pet licenses so we are ready. Last time, it was a scramble to get all the steps done at various offices in 30 days.

Lesson learned last time, don't forget the pet bowls at a rest stop. That was also a husband thing. He and his dad drove them.
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Old 01-28-2020, 05:23 PM
 
135 posts, read 55,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spedteach17 View Post
I also learned to look up how to get a license, register a car, and pet licenses so we are ready. Last time, it was a scramble to get all the steps done at various offices in 30 days.

Lesson learned last time, don't forget the pet bowls at a rest stop. That was also a husband thing. He and his dad drove them.

Eggcellent. Oh, and confirm car insurer covers policies in the new state (some don't cover all 50).
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Old 01-28-2020, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Western MA
2,174 posts, read 1,491,406 times
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For me it's:

1: As much as you think you are editing and getting rid of stuff while packing and before the move, get rid of MORE. A lot more.

2: Don't underestimate the time it will take you to feel settled in and comfortable. Even if you love your new place, if you have moved away from family and/or friends and/or to a different state, it will take some time to really transition.

More on #2: Even though I unpacked immediately, the emotional aspect of uprooting my life has really taken me about a year to overcome. The last time I moved to a new state, it was about the same. Do what you need to for self care. Don't be surprised if you go through a period of depression or just don't feel up to jumping right into your normal activities.

The above doesn't mean that I would necessarily change anything, but just to be aware and to be kind to myself, to give myself time to adjust.
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Old 01-28-2020, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Western MA
2,174 posts, read 1,491,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy4Chickens View Post
We moved from sunny California to Western Wyoming over Thanksgiving weekend. In hindsight we should have been checking our route to see how the weather would be on the day we wanted to leave. If there were any winter weather warnings etc. We only checked the weather in our part of California and it showed rain. No big deal. Until in Utah it became snow and then we got a notification that there was a lot of traffic backed up, but instead of stopping to plan a new route, we continued on getting trapped in the traffic because some semi truck had crashed out on the top of Scipio pass. We finally were able to get off the I-15 and ended up in a tiny town called Delta, Utah. Exhausted we stopped for food. We couldn't stay anywhere because we had several large and small animals in our vehicles. We continued on the back roads of Utah before we finally made it to Provo. Again this entire time it was snowing and road conditions were poor. We slept in the Walmart parking lot in Provo, before we continued our journey up into Idaho and finally over to Wyoming. A trip that should have taken 15 1/2 hours, took us 22 white knuckle hours.

So yeah in hindsight we should have checked the weather a couple days before and left a day earlier, or later, but we picked the worst possible day to travel. And for the record I did tell my husband we should leave a day earlier and he shot me down and said that we'd be fine.
Wow, you must have kissed the ground when you finally arrived!
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Old 01-28-2020, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Dessert
5,675 posts, read 2,668,329 times
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Try to move with a sensible partner.

My husband was all gung ho to move to Arizona. Now we're here, he insists he needs to be near the ocean. The Pacific Ocean. In California or Oregon, not Mexico or Washington. He might accept Hawaii, but we've already lived there and he knows I won't go back.

Dude, woulda been nice if you decided that before you insisted on buying a house in Tucson.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:10 PM
 
5,779 posts, read 5,043,698 times
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Pare down possessions drastically before the move. If at all possible, rent for some time first, to get the lay of the land. If you have school age kids, make sure you obsessively research the schools that your kid would attend, not just the district, especially if your kid is not racially/ethnically/religiously like most of the families around you. Anticipate reactive depression if you have a tendency - even if the move is a good one, for a good reason, to a good place, it is a tremendous life stressor.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ and Redwood City, CA
11,029 posts, read 7,195,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
Try to move with a sensible partner.
I'm sorry.

Quote:
Dude, woulda been nice if you decided that before you insisted on buying a house in Tucson.
Yep.
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