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Old 01-29-2020, 07:36 AM
 
Location: SC
216 posts, read 138,767 times
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If your hobbies are largely connected to a specific geographic area, ex: rock climbing, surfing, white-water kayaking, snow-shoeing, 4X4 rock crawling, ATVing, Motorcycle riding, hunting, etc. really understand if you can participate in said hobbies in your new area. Having moved half away across the countryto a place which offers zero in what I like to do outside, I will now never consider another area that doesn't allow for my hobbies.
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Florida
13,640 posts, read 6,732,513 times
Reputation: 27959
I like the color coding the box idea. I marked the boxes from 1-whatever. In my computer I wrote down everything that was in box #1, #2, etc. rather than having to write everything on the outside of the box and printed it out. Unfortunately I numbered the top of the boxes and when the movers put them on top of each other I was screwed. Lesson Learned.

I also kept a box with me that had the important things we needed for the first night & next morning in the new place: soap, toilet paper, linens, towels, shampoo, etc.
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:55 AM
 
1,222 posts, read 558,989 times
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TimAZ said:
My advice: Don’t move 2/3 of the stuff that you think you need. It’s often cheaper to buy new replacements than to pack/move/unpack the old stuff. Donate, donate,donate.

I respectfully disagree it is cheaper to buy replacements unless your stuff is very old and you don't like it.
We gave away sofas and much much more, to charities, craigslist and curb for months but still ended up with a lot of belongings that I held in my hands and asked "is it worth 50 cents a pound" (professional movers cost) and yes it was. It ended up costing less than 50 cents/lb and I regret nothing moved except the exhaustion of packing.

My looking back: We thought we knew what "moving day" would be like but it was so many more hours, over 8 hours, and as senior citizens was absolutely exhausting, supervising, having worked until midnight night before packing last kitchen stuff. Even the movers were not prepared for our size load. The estimator underestimated because they ran out of room on the truck (they had a quarter load already on trying to maximize profit) and had to come pick up what would not fit and send it a week later. Highly experienced company got it wrong.

Secondly (very important), we let the driver push us around on how quickly we had to drive to our new home. We should have put our foot down harder and said "no way we can accept delivery in 2 days". We were physically exhausted and spent the night at motel in town and then 1,000 mile drive. They pushed us for less time on road but if they get another short job they delay delivery to us, adding another night in destination motel for us not knowing when they'd arrive. Exactly what happened to us. Stress, stress and exhaustion. Delivery day another 7 hours of on our feet all day long, no breaks.

Worst thing I've done in 20 years and I've moved several times in my life. It gets much harder with age.
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
6,810 posts, read 5,674,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I can tell you, though I'm not sure it would be helpful.

We "moved" -- the reason for the sneer quotes will become apparent -- in November 2018 from Silicon Valley to Scottsdale, Arizona.

We were under no pressure to sell the house we moved from and in hindsight, that was a mistake. I should have realized my unmotivated spouse would leave 99% of his hoarded crap -- er, valued belongings -- behind.

This guy was so move-resistant that he only brought a few things with him to the new house. Then he would return to the old house, 750 miles away, and bring back 4 or 5 more things, mainly computers, radios and other devices. Lather rinse repeat. When he left me a few months ago to go back to Silicon Valley, everything he'd brought fit into his car: A PT Cruiser, not exactly a commodious vehicle. It's almost like he planned a temporary stay from the beginning.

So I guess the moral of the story is: If you're moving, really MOVE. Don't leave things behind in storage or at a relative's place.
Well, the individual that wanted to move really did!

(PS — you are better off now!)
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:08 AM
 
1,222 posts, read 558,989 times
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parentologist said: If at all possible, rent for some time first, to get the lay of the land.

We really wanted to do this. Looked and toured rentals in our move location but spouse didn't like the rentals and didn't want to move twice. Luckily we found the perfect home to buy on our scouting "vacation". Buying was stressful (hadn't planned to buy this quickly) but after our very stressful move I am so VERY happy we didn't rent first (spouse gets full credit for this decision).

Renting would have added a lot more expense plus 2nd move cost plus storage of stuff that would not fit.
Our house turned out to be perfect for us and we were lucky.
Spend more time in the area before buying, check crime, check loud dogs or neighbors. We are grateful our home is not one street over, ours is a cul de sac and the next street is a throughway shortcut (we didn't know that). We did not have a great realtor, she had her eye on the commission.
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
6,810 posts, read 5,674,895 times
Reputation: 15179
Check your health insurance coverage; you may need a new provider if you are changing States.

Also, if you are still looking a places to live, be sure to visit at night, during daytime business hours and early morning to get an understanding of noise. I once was getting ready to sign a contract to buy an investment townhouse and decided to run by once more (at 11am) to see the driveway over concerns about how steep it was. I heard loud noises coming from behind the concrete wall on the back property line. I knew that was the back lot of an auto dealership and all was quiet when I’d viewed the prior evening. But they were unloading new cars from a transport truck. I soon learned that happened all day a few times a week. Very loud! Would have been ok for me, but a potential family with kids who took naps would not fit...... so check it out.
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Old 01-29-2020, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,343 posts, read 22,178,234 times
Reputation: 36334
Unfortunately, all of my moves have been for employment. I moved back to my hometown a few years ago for a job. I used to live in Indianapolis, which was central to a lot of other places for weekend trips. Where I live now is about an hour and a half from the nearest metro and three and a half hours from a major city.
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Western MA
2,174 posts, read 1,491,406 times
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Another one from me:

If at all possible, try to have some kind of window coverings in place when you move in, or at least some plan for window coverings in the bedrooms, even if that is just tacking up sheets or even garbage bags over the windows until you can get something more permanent installed. You're going to be exhausted. You're going to want to sleep and have privacy and not have to deal with street lights, car lights, sunlight at the crack of dawn, etc.

Along the same line, keep a box with you (not with the movers) that will contain some immediate essentials. Sheets and pillows to make up beds, shower curtain, soap, change of clothes, whatever you need to cover windows, makings for coffee, toilet paper, bottle opener, scissors. Start your list now.

Also, set up your bed (or beds) first before you do anything else. Trust me, you'll thank me.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:12 PM
 
44,986 posts, read 18,637,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spedteach17 View Post
Timely because we are moving 1200 miles in about a month.

This time of year, considering weather is important for driving. I did not consider it on our way out here and we lucked out that year.

I numbered and color coded our boxes so we will see how well that works. I have a notebook with the box list and a quick description of contents. Colored dots - kitchen=yellow, brown=garage and kids are red/pink, adults a color. Even if they don't make it the right room, I can sort quickly.

Do not leave too much for the last minute! Last time, I severely underestimated how much stuff I had left to pack. I've been planning this move for a year and my kids aren't little anymore.

I'm busy making lists of accounts who will need address changes, bill pay changes, etc.

I have another list for things to do like oil change, get vet records, things to carry in our car vs the moving truck, looking up boarding for our pets for a few days when I get there.
^^^This^^^

We rented for a months before we bought. But we never were at the neighborhood where we bought during rush hour times, nor did we take a close look at development plans for the area.

I wish we had. When we leave our neighborhood, it is off to the races. Our home value has gone up considerably, because of the surrounding development, but don't carte for the traffic.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:14 PM
 
44,986 posts, read 18,637,016 times
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Also, I would have spent more time scouting out a good real estate agent.

In NC, you sign on with a buyers' agent. Once we signed on the dotted line, her enthusiasm waned. I wish we had parted ways right there. Instead we hauled her across the finish line.
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