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Old 05-14-2009, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Southern California
15,084 posts, read 18,576,452 times
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What is the purpose of a weigh station anyway?
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Old 05-14-2009, 12:27 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 5,195,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
What is the purpose of a weigh station anyway?
They make sure trucks aren't overloaded, drivers aren't working too many hours, and trucks are in safe operating condition. If the truckers aren't in compliance with the law, they get huge fines.

Those fines are the reason I'd avoid the weigh stations if you have a chance. States are hurting for money, and a lot of them are looking for ways to increase revenue through traffic enforcement. If your rental truck happens to have a light out, or cracked bushings, or a tire that isn't quite legal, you could be the proud new owner of a traffic citation. I know you're thinking it's just a rental truck, but try to explain that to a bureaucrat.
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Old 05-14-2009, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Southern California
15,084 posts, read 18,576,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
They make sure trucks aren't overloaded, drivers aren't working too many hours, and trucks are in safe operating condition. If the truckers aren't in compliance with the law, they get huge fines.

Those fines are the reason I'd avoid the weigh stations if you have a chance. States are hurting for money, and a lot of them are looking for ways to increase revenue through traffic enforcement. If your rental truck happens to have a light out, or cracked bushings, or a tire that isn't quite legal, you could be the proud new owner of a traffic citation. I know you're thinking it's just a rental truck, but try to explain that to a bureaucrat.
Thanks for the info. I pass a one in each direction on my daily commute through the local mountain pass. I thought it has something to do with safety through the pass but that didn't make sense on the days when I saw the stations closed...
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Old 05-15-2009, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,536 posts, read 13,470,968 times
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Upon entering each state from PA to FL we would stop at the first weigh station. Depending on the state, some waved us through saying we didn't have to stop while others gave us a brief scrutiny and then sent us through. Since weigh station compliance is not a federal regulation and is instead regulated by each state, your best bet is to stop at the first "chicken coop" and get the info straight from the horse's mouth. It was our experience that the blanket "you don't have to stop" was not true.
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Old 05-15-2009, 11:38 AM
 
Location: In God's country
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My husband has been in the moving business for 10+ years. and NO it is not required that you stop at weigh stations.
The only time the weigh stations will stop you...is if you have a moving companies name on the side such as Allied, United ect...Penske is not one of these.
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Old 05-16-2009, 10:35 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 20,046,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
They make sure trucks aren't overloaded, drivers aren't working too many hours, and trucks are in safe operating condition. If the truckers aren't in compliance with the law, they get huge fines.

Those fines are the reason I'd avoid the weigh stations if you have a chance. States are hurting for money, and a lot of them are looking for ways to increase revenue through traffic enforcement. If your rental truck happens to have a light out, or cracked bushings, or a tire that isn't quite legal, you could be the proud new owner of a traffic citation. I know you're thinking it's just a rental truck, but try to explain that to a bureaucrat.
People who rent "U Haul" type rental trucks and are moving their own personal property are not treated the same way that commercial truck drivers (and their vehicles) are. The GVW rating of these trucks is below the requirement to have a CDL and any equipment violations you receive would go to the owner of the truck you've leased. Besides, most equipment tickets ("fix-it" tickets) don't involve fines for non-CDL holders. As other posters have said, just drive into the weigh station and you'll most likely be waved on (or given the green light). Have a great trip!

BTW, the folks at the weigh stations have a VERY good idea of who they are dealing with even before the truck drives onto the scale. (And they know the difference between a rental truck and a commercial vehicle!) They have databases that give the trucking company's safety ratings and inspection history. They know who the "bad actors" are. They're NOT out to get folks who don't drive trucks for a living and are just moving their personal property!

Last edited by Crew Chief; 05-16-2009 at 11:02 PM..
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Old 05-16-2009, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
71 posts, read 481,234 times
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While JKWing maybe correct that the DOT in weigh stations don't know if you're a commerical vehicle or not and they may chase you down, it is a small likelyhood, especially in a 16' truck. Weigh Stations are for commerical vehicles only. They are primarily looking for commerical drivers driving over hours or trucks overloaded. If you are moving yourself in a 16' truck, it is very, very unlikely you would get pulled over for passing a weigh station because you certainly wouldn't be overweight in most cases. In fact, I've been in the moving industry for over 26 years like JK, while my time is now spent in national account sales, I was an interstate driver for 16 years, operations for another 3 years and I have never heard of anyone getting pulled over in a rental truck for passing a weigh station. I'm sure it has happened to someone...maybe, but I've never heard of it.

I'm just saying....

Unrelated to this topic, I would never dismiss anyone who has 30 years of experience in this business like JKWing. In fact, it is a definite benefit having someone with that experience posting on this forum. Thank you JK.

Last edited by Scott Luther; 05-16-2009 at 11:07 PM..
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Old 05-16-2009, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
71 posts, read 481,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
Upon entering each state from PA to FL we would stop at the first weigh station. Depending on the state, some waved us through saying we didn't have to stop while others gave us a brief scrutiny and then sent us through. Since weigh station compliance is not a federal regulation and is instead regulated by each state, your best bet is to stop at the first "chicken coop" and get the info straight from the horse's mouth. It was our experience that the blanket "you don't have to stop" was not true.
Just a clarification...weigh stations are not regulated by the states. The laws are enforced by each states' state police officers, but empowered by the DOT. These are federally regulated. Back when they created CDL's, they also empowered the state troopers with the ability to enforce DOT laws. Every commerical truck driver has to obey the same laws in each state.
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Old 05-17-2009, 11:33 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 20,046,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Luther View Post
...Every commerical truck driver has to obey the same laws in each state.
Not true; truckers must obey all federal, state AND local laws of the jusridictions they operate in. And state and local laws vary WIDELY. For example, I must follow all truck routes unless I'm delivering locally. Local regulations concerning engine brake usage, parking and MANY other issues affect truckers everywhere they drive.
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Old 05-18-2009, 10:47 AM
 
Location: this side of knoxville tn...
253 posts, read 743,774 times
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Default from a trucker

Quote:
Originally Posted by WVfatboy View Post
I'm getting ready to move from Virginia to Louisiana. I rented a 16ft Penske truck and car puller. I noticed that they require you to stop at weigh stations. I found a thread on here that says you don't really have to if you are hauling PERSONAL items. I also noticed that they we all pretty talking about different weights and truck sizes. most of the trucks they were talking about were the larger moving trucks. So, with a 16ft truck going from VA to LA will I need to stop in the weigh stations?
hubby is a over the road trucker, meaning a full semi, and no....uhaul things do not have to stop....if you take notice of the "weight" part of the weight station signs, you will see, that you only stop if you are OVER the posted weight, which almost always excluded a typical uhaul type truck. he sees so many uhaul trucks, even camper trailers thinking they have to go in a weigh station it aint funny....they are wiegh stations for truckers to make sure they are not carring to much weight for the roads they travel, its a DOT(dept of transportation) requirement, etc.
we are retired military, and move alot still, always use a uhaul, you do not have to pull in, they will just laugh when you do an gives them something to talk about rest of the day....read the signs in regards to posted wieght, if your haulen very heavy and want to be sure...weigh your uhaul empty, and again when loaded, write down your final weight, and if you see a sign that says "anything over "x"amount of wieght and you are over that...then pull in"......other then that...your good to go. again...wieght stations are manily set up for truckers to be sure they are following DOT laws. bes of luck on your move...
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