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Old 08-23-2010, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Thornrose Cemetery
27 posts, read 28,565 times
Reputation: 32

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Yes you can hear y'all all over the country. Unfortunately. Moreso in urban speech. As far as the debate on southern characteristics coming out and bleeding into other regions speech patterns, I just think it's a sign that Americans are getting lazy when it comes to general everyday speech. I blame popular media and a breakdown in the education system. Parents should take more interest in their children so they know they are going to school so they can be educated and will talk correctly, and not like a prison inmate.
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:40 PM
 
2,757 posts, read 5,642,341 times
Reputation: 1125
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
and what is with all the fixin. I fixin dinner etc.

Was it broke?
It's basically old slang for to prepare/make or to present. Here you go (it's the 4th verb). My father and his family are all from Cincinnati and I remember being up there and my grandmother saying junk like "Fix yourself and sandwich" or "did you fix yourself some cereal?" I haven't used it in a long time because it'll throw people off but it's just a different verb to use. Now "fittin'/fitting is just wrong.
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Old 08-23-2010, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 11,975,473 times
Reputation: 2650
The use of "fixin'" [to do something] is almost as common in Texas as the use of "y'all". I prefer to speak standard English, but the foregoing usages are perfectly legitimate regionalisms, although they should be confined to colloquial speech and not used in formal writing.
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Old 08-23-2010, 06:12 PM
 
2,757 posts, read 5,642,341 times
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^^^Yeah, I agree with that.
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Old 08-24-2010, 01:05 PM
 
2,757 posts, read 5,642,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
RE: Southern Blacks- Yao
Southern Whites- Yawl



Been busy and off line most of the week and probably will mostly be until the weekend, but had a few free minutes to look in and caught this thread.

This may well be the case, Spade. Earlier when you said in Texas it was pronounced "Yao" I did a double-take! LOL Because I had never heard it pronounced that way, or at least that I could discern...even among blacks.

But then again, maybe I really wasn't listening too closely and that there well could be such a general difference between the two groups. I think I will pay some closer attention because it has me curious now!
I know you were speaking to Spade but I haven't heard anyone say Yao before and I think a of y'all are missing something. I have heard the very open/drawn out version of "y'all" and it does sound like yao but it ends with the letter l at the end (yaol). The only people I've heard it say it that way are people from the Appalachians, rural folks,and people who have long family roots in the city I live in.
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Old 08-24-2010, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,982 posts, read 35,197,088 times
Reputation: 7428
Once people realize the South is a extremely large region and is not monotholic; the better off people will be. People attempting to define southern language and dialect; when in reality I've never heard or pronounced any of those words like the way most of you have defined.
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Old 08-24-2010, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,984 posts, read 13,409,040 times
Reputation: 3371
Not to be racist, but for what it's worth, I heard several young black people in Minnesota (at the Mall of America) say "y'all." The MOA is a popular tourist attraction, so maybe they weren't from MN.

This is NOT intended as racism/prejudice, just an observation.
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Old 08-24-2010, 09:58 PM
 
4,803 posts, read 10,169,748 times
Reputation: 2785
yeah and it's really annoying especially when Paula Dean uses it as she's pouring globs of butter all over her food.
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Old 08-24-2010, 10:54 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,966 posts, read 24,148,184 times
Reputation: 14762
To answer the OP's question: Yes. It has.
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 11,975,473 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Not to be racist, but for what it's worth, I heard several young black people in Minnesota (at the Mall of America) say "y'all." The MOA is a popular tourist attraction, so maybe they weren't from MN.

This is NOT intended as racism/prejudice, just an observation.
I don't think there's any issue of racial prejudice here. African Americans with long-established roots in the North and in Canada (dating back prior to the Civil War) reflect the accent patterns and dialect typical for those regions. However, the first half of the 20th Century also saw a large migration of African Americans from the South up to the industrial North. This migration carried with it typical Southern dialect and accents, a good deal of which have been maintained to the present. In an earlier post I suggested the possibility that one factor in what I perceive to be the general Southernization of American English vowel pronunciation and accent stress may be the spread of Southern speech and language features into the overall population as a result of Black migration from the South to other areas of the country.
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