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Old 08-25-2010, 08:18 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Not to be racist, but for what it's worth, I heard several young black people in Minnesota (at the Mall of America) say "y'all." The MOA is a popular tourist attraction, so maybe they weren't from MN.

This is NOT intended as racism/prejudice, just an observation.
That wasn't racist at all. I realized with black people, accents are more distinguishable among different area than other races. For instance, a white person from Philly and a White person from Baltimore accent sound similar. But Philly and Baltimore accents coming from black people are very distinct, some similarities but you'll notice the difference. The distinctions are also noticed amongst southern cities. It may be a middle class, lower class kind of situation.
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Old 08-25-2010, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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OTOH when I was a teenager and my family moved from DC to northeast Louisiana, I thought everyone there - white people primarily - "sounded black". No doubt because the African-American population in DC at that time generally retained a very characteristically Deep Southern accent. At that point I was only used to hearing North Texas or Northern Virginia accents on a regular basis. The typical accents of ALL persons in Northern Louisiana and Mississippi just sounded stereotypically African American to me at that time.
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Old 03-02-2012, 03:47 AM
 
716 posts, read 1,230,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I have never heard ANY southerner saying "Y'all" in the manner of "YOWL". Are you serious?
Black southerners say it like "yowl"...listen to a ti song where he says the word.
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Old 03-02-2012, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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I'd say I hear it somewhat around here from the younger whites around here, but they don't have southern accents. I'd say it comes from either hanging around blacks or being southern migrants. It definitely turns heads when people use it around here. You all or you guys is more common around here. Some of the whites here that use it speak African-American vernacular...I've seen two examples of white girls around here that talk just like blacks. So basically, I'd say the term "y'all" is still mainly a southern characteristic, but not everybody that uses it speaks with a southern accent, especially outside of the south. The Lower Midwest tends to feature it to a slight degree for sure...i've heard people use "y'all" as far north as central Indiana and central Ohio. Still, I'd say that north of the Ohio River and highway 60, it is used much more sparingly.
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Old 03-02-2012, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
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Never hear it here in Northwest Montana. Like ever. It's either you guys or youse guys if you're around Butte/Anaconda. Even 'you all' sounds very bizarre in most situations. My county is only 0.2% black though.
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Old 03-02-2012, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh (via Chicago, via Pittsburgh)
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No. I never hear it.
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Old 03-03-2012, 02:35 AM
 
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I think "you guys" is more common in the South than "ya'll" is outside of the South (with the exception of African American communities) If "you guys" is said with a Southern accent, then nobody thinks anything of it.
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:52 PM
 
28,896 posts, read 53,955,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltaire's Shadow View Post
Yes you can hear y'all all over the country. Unfortunately. Moreso in urban speech. As far as the debate on southern characteristics coming out and bleeding into other regions speech patterns, I just think it's a sign that Americans are getting lazy when it comes to general everyday speech. I blame popular media and a breakdown in the education system. Parents should take more interest in their children so they know they are going to school so they can be educated and will talk correctly, and not like a prison inmate.
As someone who speaks and writes proper English, right down to drilling my children on adverb endings, I tend to disagree.

Language changes. After all, where are Thee, Thou, Thy, and Thine? Yet, 250 years ago, these words served a very useful purpose of distinguishing between formal and informal address, the way Germans use 'Du' and 'Sie' today, with Thee denoting a closer and more intimate bond than the more formal You. Today, outside of the Book of Common Prayer, Rite I, you won't find them in common usage at all.

In that sense, I would offer that Y'all is actually a very practical construction, solving an awkward problem in English -- The lack of a pronoun to differentiate between speaking to one person or speaking to several. No Southerner would ever say y'all to one person, after all. Y'all got that?
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Old 12-20-2012, 08:20 AM
 
1,437 posts, read 2,555,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post

Language changes. After all, where are Thee, Thou, Thy, and Thine? Yet, 250 years ago, these words served a very useful purpose of distinguishing between formal and informal address, the way Germans use 'Du' and 'Sie' today, with Thee denoting a closer and more intimate bond than the more formal You. Today, outside of the Book of Common Prayer, Rite I, you won't find them in common usage at all.

In that sense, I would offer that Y'all is actually a very practical construction, solving an awkward problem in English -- The lack of a pronoun to differentiate between speaking to one person or speaking to several. No Southerner would ever say y'all to one person, after all. Y'all got that?
Lets hear it for some Rite I!! or even some 1928 BCP. That's what I grew up with. It really annoys me when TV shows.. big offender here is "Family Guy" ... have Southerners saying y'all to one individual. If y'all is said to one person, that person represents a larger group. A lot of Northerners don't understand this distinction. If I said to my friend "are you coming over to watch the game of Sunday" it would be just him. But it I said to to him( and him alone) "are y'all coming..." it would be known I was asking about him and his wife and kids. Or if you go into the store and ask the clerk "where is y'alls bathroom" the clerk represents a larger organization. We are aware that the clerk is singular. You would not say "i like the color shirt y'all are wearing" because it is just her wearing the shirt
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Old 12-20-2012, 10:21 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,868 posts, read 12,505,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
As someone who speaks and writes proper English, right down to drilling my children on adverb endings, I tend to disagree.

Language changes. After all, where are Thee, Thou, Thy, and Thine? Yet, 250 years ago, these words served a very useful purpose of distinguishing between formal and informal address, the way Germans use 'Du' and 'Sie' today, with Thee denoting a closer and more intimate bond than the more formal You. Today, outside of the Book of Common Prayer, Rite I, you won't find them in common usage at all.

In that sense, I would offer that Y'all is actually a very practical construction, solving an awkward problem in English -- The lack of a pronoun to differentiate between speaking to one person or speaking to several. No Southerner would ever say y'all to one person, after all. Y'all got that?

you are even more correct than you state. In fact back when Thee,etc existed, you was a PLURAL - you didnt say Thee, thou, thine to a group of people, no matter how informal (and anyone can pick up a King James bible and confirm that usage)

The absence of a the singular/plural in the second persons means that we tend to generate new plurals - the most common ones in the North are youse or you guys. I dislike both those usages and will sometimes use Y'all (note I grew up in NYC, my speech is mostly northeastern/NYC, but I picked up 'Y'all' (and a liking for grits) while living in North Florida - and I currently live in yankeefied Northern Virginia)
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