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Old 11-12-2010, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Floyd County, IN
23,662 posts, read 41,001,456 times
Reputation: 16254

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For all the talk about the huge in-migration of people to the South over the past several decades as well as job growth, one would think that poverty rates would continue to lower. That is not the case in the vast majority of the South.

States with counties that have a poverty rate of <10% as of 2008.


Arkansas- 1 county (Saline, Little Rock metro)

Louisiana- 1 parish (Ascension, Baton Rouge metro)

Mississippi- 1 county (DeSoto, Memphis metro)

Alabama- 1 county (Shelby, Birmingham metro)

South Carolina- 0 counties

Georgia- 11 counties (Harris, Columbus metro, Columbia, Augusta metro, Oconee, Athens metro, Gwinnett, Atlanta metro, Coweta, Atlanta Metro, Fayette, Atlanta metro, Forsyth, Atlanta metro, Cherokee, Atlanta metro, Paulding, Atlanta metro, Douglas, Atlanta metro, Cobb, Atlanta metro.)

North Carolina- 5 counties (Cabarrus, Charlotte metro, Union, Charlotte metro, Wake, Raleigh metro, Currituck, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News metro, Camden, Elizabeth City micro)

Tennessee- 4 counties (Willamson, Nashville metro, Wilson, Nashville metro, Sumner, Nashville metro, Cheatham, Nashville metro)

Kentucky- 6 counties (Boone, Cincinnati metro, Bullitt, Louisville metro, Oldham, Louisville metro, Spencer, Louisville metro, Woodford, Lexington-Fayette metro, Anderson, Frankfort micro)


Virginia- 36 counties
(Roanoke, Roanoke metro, Botetourt, Roanoke metro, Bath, rural, Augusta, Staunton micro, Rockingham, Harrisonburg metro,
Shenandoah, rural, Frederick, Winchester metro, Clarke, Washington DC metro, Loudon, Washington DC metro, Fairfax, Washington DC metro, Prince William, Washington DC metro, Fauquier, Washington DC metro, Stafford, Washington DC metro, Spotsylvania, Washington DC metro, Rappahannock, rural, Culpeper, Culpeper micro, Orange, rural, King George, rural, Greene, Charlottesville metro, Bedford, Lynchburg metro, Isle of Wight, Virginia Beach-Norfolk metro, James City, Virginia Beach-Norfolk metro, Amelia, Richmond metro, Powhatan, Richmond metro, Fluvanna, Charlottesville metro, Louisa, Richmond metro, Goochland, Richmond metro, Hanover, Richmond metro, Henrico, Richmond metro, Chesterfield, Richmond metro, New Kent, Richmond metro, King William, Richmond metro, York, Virginia Beach-Norfolk metro, Gloucester, Virginia Beach-Norfolk metro, Caroline, Richmond metro, Mathews, Virginia Beach-Norfolk metro,

Last edited by GraniteStater; 11-13-2010 at 05:57 PM..
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Old 11-12-2010, 11:59 PM
 
4,684 posts, read 8,679,239 times
Reputation: 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
For all the talk about the huge in-migration of people to the South over the past several decades as well as job growth, one would think that poverty rates would continue to lower. That is not the case in the vast majority of the South.

States with counties that have a poverty rate of <10% as of 2008.


Arkansas- 1 county (Saline, Little Rock metro)

Louisiana- 1 parish (Ascension, Baton Rouge metro)

Mississippi- 1 county (DeSoto, Memphis metro)

Alabama- 1 county (Shelby, Birmingham metro)

South Carolina- 0 counties

Georgia- 11 counties (Harris, Columbus metro, Columbia, Augusta metro, Oconee, Athens metro, Gwinnett, Atlanta metro, Coweta, Atlanta Metro, Fayette, Atlanta metro, Forsyth, Atlanta metro, Cherokee, Atlanta metro, Paulding, Atlanta metro, Douglas, Atlanta metro, Cobb, Atlanta metro.)

North Carolina- 5 counties (Cabarrus, Charlotte metro, Union, Charlotte metro, Wake, Raleigh metro, Currituck, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News metro, Camden, Elizabeth City micro)

Tennessee- 4 counties (Willamson, Nashville metro, Wilson, Nashville metro, Sumner, Nashville metro, Cheatham, Nashville metro)

Kentucky- 6 counties (Boone, Cincinnati metro, Bullitt, Louisville metro, Oldham, Louisville metro, Spencer, Louisville metro, Woodford, Lexington-Fayette metro, Anderson, Frankfort micro)


I did leave out the outliers like Maryland, Florida, Texas, and Oklahoma as the focus is on the core of the Southeast. I am still tabulating Virginia.
Great information and keep it coming. I think a more interesting, perhaps a question as a result of your question, is why is the South with its migration numbers still experiencing higher poverty rates?
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Old 11-13-2010, 07:54 AM
 
Location: The South
767 posts, read 2,152,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
Great information and keep it coming. I think a more interesting, perhaps a question as a result of your question, is why is the South with its migration numbers still experiencing higher poverty rates?
We probably need a better quality migrant.
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Old 11-13-2010, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Virginia Highland, GA
1,939 posts, read 4,349,623 times
Reputation: 1275
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
For all the talk about the huge in-migration of people to the South over the past several decades as well as job growth, one would think that poverty rates would continue to lower. That is not the case in the vast majority of the South.

States with counties that have a poverty rate of <10% as of 2008.


Arkansas- 1 county (Saline, Little Rock metro)

Louisiana- 1 parish (Ascension, Baton Rouge metro)

Mississippi- 1 county (DeSoto, Memphis metro)

Alabama- 1 county (Shelby, Birmingham metro)

South Carolina- 0 counties

Georgia- 11 counties (Harris, Columbus metro, Columbia, Augusta metro, Oconee, Athens metro, Gwinnett, Atlanta metro, Coweta, Atlanta Metro, Fayette, Atlanta metro, Forsyth, Atlanta metro, Cherokee, Atlanta metro, Paulding, Atlanta metro, Douglas, Atlanta metro, Cobb, Atlanta metro.)

North Carolina- 5 counties (Cabarrus, Charlotte metro, Union, Charlotte metro, Wake, Raleigh metro, Currituck, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News metro, Camden, Elizabeth City micro)

Tennessee- 4 counties (Willamson, Nashville metro, Wilson, Nashville metro, Sumner, Nashville metro, Cheatham, Nashville metro)

Kentucky- 6 counties (Boone, Cincinnati metro, Bullitt, Louisville metro, Oldham, Louisville metro, Spencer, Louisville metro, Woodford, Lexington-Fayette metro, Anderson, Frankfort micro)


I did leave out the outliers like Maryland, Florida, Texas, and Oklahoma as the focus is on the core of the Southeast. I am still tabulating Virginia.
The states you conveniently left out, have huge poverty areas, especially TX, FL and OK.
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Old 11-13-2010, 08:03 AM
 
430 posts, read 1,002,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
Great information and keep it coming. I think a more interesting, perhaps a question as a result of your question, is why is the South with its migration numbers still experiencing higher poverty rates?
Because people that move in do not move to the poorest areas. The parents do not say "hey lets put our kids in the worst school system so that they will come out as top of their class." There is a cycle that has been going on for generations that involves dropping out of school and not worrying about education. Until you can stop that cycle, then you will continue having poverty problems.
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Old 11-13-2010, 08:20 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,123 posts, read 39,375,160 times
Reputation: 15768
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghett61 View Post
Because people that move in do not move to the poorest areas. The parents do not say "hey lets put our kids in the worst school system so that they will come out as top of their class." There is a cycle that has been going on for generations that involves dropping out of school and not worrying about education. Until you can stop that cycle, then you will continue having poverty problems.
That pretty much sums it up.
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Old 11-13-2010, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Augusta, GA ''The fastest rising city in the southeast''
7,425 posts, read 13,512,038 times
Reputation: 897
Intresting statistics, but Florida is definitely apart of the core in the southeast. I don't include Arkansas and Louisiana as the Southeast.
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Old 11-13-2010, 09:08 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,344 posts, read 21,636,824 times
Reputation: 13374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
For all the talk about the huge in-migration of people to the South over the past several decades as well as job growth, one would think that poverty rates would continue to lower. That is not the case in the vast majority of the South.

States with counties that have a poverty rate of <10% as of 2008.


Arkansas- 1 county (Saline, Little Rock metro)

Louisiana- 1 parish (Ascension, Baton Rouge metro)

Mississippi- 1 county (DeSoto, Memphis metro)

Alabama- 1 county (Shelby, Birmingham metro)

South Carolina- 0 counties

Georgia- 11 counties (Harris, Columbus metro, Columbia, Augusta metro, Oconee, Athens metro, Gwinnett, Atlanta metro, Coweta, Atlanta Metro, Fayette, Atlanta metro, Forsyth, Atlanta metro, Cherokee, Atlanta metro, Paulding, Atlanta metro, Douglas, Atlanta metro, Cobb, Atlanta metro.)

North Carolina- 5 counties (Cabarrus, Charlotte metro, Union, Charlotte metro, Wake, Raleigh metro, Currituck, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News metro, Camden, Elizabeth City micro)

Tennessee- 4 counties (Willamson, Nashville metro, Wilson, Nashville metro, Sumner, Nashville metro, Cheatham, Nashville metro)

Kentucky- 6 counties (Boone, Cincinnati metro, Bullitt, Louisville metro, Oldham, Louisville metro, Spencer, Louisville metro, Woodford, Lexington-Fayette metro, Anderson, Frankfort micro)


I did leave out the outliers like Maryland, Florida, Texas, and Oklahoma as the focus is on the core of the Southeast. I am still tabulating Virginia.
It's interesting that the only "core city" county of a MSA on this list for NC is Wake County. Raleigh is actually in Wake County unlike the other NC counties listed here. This doesn't surprise me at all. Wake has added the most people (by far) of any NC county over the last ten years and is just now passing Mecklenburg (Charlotte) as the state's most populated.
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Old 11-13-2010, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Meggett, SC
10,955 posts, read 10,185,072 times
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If you look at the evolution of the South, I think the answer lies in there. The South, in the 17th and 18th century, had a class structure with a well defined aristocracy. There was simply no middle class in this structure but rather the very wealthy land owners, then the poor small farmers, followed by the indentured servants and slaves. With the Civil War, this entire society collapsed, with both the landowners and the freed slaves catapulted into severe poverty. Reconstruction, as it was employed, served to reverse the policies and politics, albiet largely unsuccessful until the Civil Rights era of the 60s, with little thought or purpose brought to the reconstruction of the financial markets.

Even when industry finally came to the South in the late 19th century, it was primarily in the form of textile mills. These mills encouraged an uneducated populace and encouraged child labor until the government put a stop to that in the early 20th century. Thus, the majority of the South has been living in poverty for generation after generation. Remember, with the influx of industry moving into the South, this has been a recent phenomena.

I would hesitate to say the South doesn't value education. I believe it does like any other area but it is dealing with a lower tax base to help fund schools, a more geographically widespread poverty issue, and generations of its populace that has lived in poverty.
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Old 11-13-2010, 11:17 AM
 
4,684 posts, read 8,679,239 times
Reputation: 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbel View Post
If you look at the evolution of the South, I think the answer lies in there. The South, in the 17th and 18th century, had a class structure with a well defined aristocracy. There was simply no middle class in this structure but rather the very wealthy land owners, then the poor small farmers, followed by the indentured servants and slaves. With the Civil War, this entire society collapsed, with both the landowners and the freed slaves catapulted into severe poverty. Reconstruction, as it was employed, served to reverse the policies and politics, albiet largely unsuccessful until the Civil Rights era of the 60s, with little thought or purpose brought to the reconstruction of the financial markets.

Even when industry finally came to the South in the late 19th century, it was primarily in the form of textile mills. These mills encouraged an uneducated populace and encouraged child labor until the government put a stop to that in the early 20th century. Thus, the majority of the South has been living in poverty for generation after generation. Remember, with the influx of industry moving into the South, this has been a recent phenomena.

I would hesitate to say the South doesn't value education. I believe it does like any other area but it is dealing with a lower tax base to help fund schools, a more geographically widespread poverty issue, and generations of its populace that has lived in poverty.
What you say makes sense. I will have to do some more research to see about education. While I do not disagree, I find that to be a hard pill to swallow. However, this aristocratic society in the South I believe still exists.
.
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