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Old 01-21-2011, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Ohio
500 posts, read 1,146,110 times
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This question is for those of you who have seasonal affective disorder, grew up in a place that had long cold dark winters and/or lots of cloudy days, and then relocated to somewhere that had long hot summers and/or mostly sunny days. Did you SAD dissipate or go away?
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Old 01-21-2011, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
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My DH grew up in a valley in PA. I think, by family, he was predisposed to depression. Anyway, he did suffer from SAD. He moved to Florida and he says he would have to be dragged away from the long sunny days, kicking and screaming, before he would willingly go back to the cold and dark days.

My oldest daughter experienced some of the same when she moved to the Washington/Maryland area back in the 1980's. She worked on it with lighting, etc, and eventually managed to deal with it. She now lives in the Carolinas and doesn't seem to have the problem.

I am sure it is debilitating for you. Good luck.
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Old 01-21-2011, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Wow -- That's really interesting!
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Old 01-22-2011, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Melbourne
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I spent last year living in Seattle and 12 months later went down to LA, even through the smog, the sunshine brightened up my outlook. I'm prone to depression, but my wife isn't and she also noticed her mood change from gloomy to more positive. Apart from sunshine itself, it also facilitates doing good healthy outdoors stuff which is hard in wet places. My .02
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Old 01-22-2011, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Pahoa Hawaii
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I used to get it when I lived in Oregon. Now I live in Puna Hawaii, one of the wettest places in the USA and never get it, but rainy weather here is much nicer than on the mainland.
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Old 01-22-2011, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,397 posts, read 20,910,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skippercollector View Post
This question is for those of you who have seasonal affective disorder, grew up in a place that had long cold dark winters and/or lots of cloudy days, and then relocated to somewhere that had long hot summers and/or mostly sunny days. Did you SAD dissipate or go away?
Stayed the same for me(I moved from Pennsylvania to Florida)......new data suggests that the time of the year in which you are born affects and sets your biological clock and this cannot be changed by increasing daylight hours later in life.

I just read a short article(Blame It On Winter) in the February 2011 issue of Scientific American Magazine but the research is as yet not conclusive.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:30 PM
 
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The UV energy above 42 degrees north latitude (a line approximately between the northern border of California and Boston) is insufficient for cutaneous vitamin D synthesis from November through February; in far northern latitudes, this reduced intensity lasts for up to 6 months. In the United States, latitudes below 34 degrees north (a line between Los Angeles and Columbia, South Carolina) allow for cutaneous production of vitamin D throughout the year.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PITTSTON2SARASOTA View Post
Stayed the same for me(I moved from Pennsylvania to Florida)......new data suggests that the time of the year in which you are born affects and sets your biological clock and this cannot be changed by increasing daylight hours later in life.

I just read a short article(Blame It On Winter) in the February 2011 issue of Scientific American Magazine but the research is as yet not conclusive.
I take Scientific American but haven't had a chance to look at it. That is interesting. I can clearly say though that my DH, who was born on Dec. 25th, did seem to respond to more exposure to sunlight. Even when we have a period of rainy weather, he gets "droopy" after a couple of days. Part of that may be psychological but whatever, it happens ..... LOL.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 9,183,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Catfish View Post
The UV energy above 42 degrees north latitude (a line approximately between the northern border of California and Boston) is insufficient for cutaneous vitamin D synthesis from November through February; in far northern latitudes, this reduced intensity lasts for up to 6 months. In the United States, latitudes below 34 degrees north (a line between Los Angeles and Columbia, South Carolina) allow for cutaneous production of vitamin D throughout the year.
and skin cancer.....catch 22 I suppose!
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Old 01-23-2011, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Ohio
500 posts, read 1,146,110 times
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Default february

Yeah, I heard about the month when you were born. For me it was February. My sister was also born in February two years after me, but she copes with the winter much better than I.
Last year I finally started taking antidepressants, which have actually helped. It's also helped that, even though Ohio has had more than its usual amount of snow, there are more bright sunny days this year than last.
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