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View Poll Results: Is the grass actually greener on the other side sometimes?
Yes, sometimes the grass is truly greener on the other side 13 68.42%
Yes, but the new place you move to will have its problems and may even be worse 5 26.32%
No, same place same thing 1 5.26%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-16-2011, 08:55 PM
 
Location: The Southeast
97 posts, read 124,757 times
Reputation: 45

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I am an 18 year old guy and I honestly hate the place I am in right now. The place I am in is the deep south portion of the US. I can see how people would be attracted to this place if they are older and stuff and want to retire but I am 18.

There is really nothing to do in this place. The education system is complete garbage to be honest (high school and middle school education that is). Tons of people here are "hood" or redneck. Another problem is that this place has made my life miserable in the 7 to 8 years I have been here.

Now I want to live in the Northeast or out on the West Coast but people will say "oh the grass is always greener on the other side", is that true sometimes?

Also, how often do you get to move around once you get older and stuff?
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:01 PM
 
Location: The Southeast
97 posts, read 124,757 times
Reputation: 45
- Due to the lack of things to do, my family and I have gotten fat (I managed to lose the weight due to internet help and really going out of my way to find ways to exercise), I mean you can't even go outside during the summers because the bugs will bite the living life out of you. A lot of people decide to stay inside.

- I went through two terrible schools, a terrible junior high school full of people who are "hood" and a high school which had no diversity (90 percent Black). The high school was okay but rarely sent kids to decent schools, did not have any sports, did not have a lot of extra curriculars but the kids were not rude and rowdy like the junior high kids.

- Due to a terrible high school system (made an 1900 on my SAT, was recommended to not take it again by counselor, said I wanted a 2200 for the Ivies, counselor said "oh nobody really gets that score"), I am stuck at a local university now where I commute to college. A terrible high school system bit me when it came to college admissions, rarely had any help.

- Not a lot of diversity here, I am 18 and have not had a girlfriend yet, next part may be a bit racist. Most women in my area are Black and honestly, I am just not into Black girls. The White girls in my area aren't like foreign White, most are Anglo and I am just not into Anglo girls either. I love Brown girls (Latinas, Persian, and even Asian) but there are barely any of them in my area. Also the Black girls here aren't exactly classy, you have a lot who are "ghetto" (they describe themselves as this, then proceed to say they will F you up).
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Old 05-17-2011, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,470,877 times
Reputation: 7746
If you don't like they way things are where you are, you won't like them somewhere else either as it's mostly a matter of perception.

In other words, problems are usually in the eyes of the beholder and, without a change in attitude, you'll find the same problems in another place.
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Old 05-17-2011, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,470,877 times
Reputation: 7746
Maybe you ought to try the Army for a complete change of pace, and location, which will REALLY open your eyes!
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Old 05-17-2011, 07:39 AM
 
Location: The Southeast
97 posts, read 124,757 times
Reputation: 45
more opinions plz
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Old 05-17-2011, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
786 posts, read 1,671,045 times
Reputation: 465
Well that phrase is about perception. Some people always want what the don't have and assume it'll be better.

Your question confuses me though. You seem to be asking 'Are things actually better in other parts of the country?' Is that right?

If you mean, is the phrase true, ie 'Will I get somewhere else and find I hate that and wish I was back home?',maybe. We don't much about you.
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Old 05-17-2011, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh (via Chicago, via Pittsburgh)
3,887 posts, read 4,826,904 times
Reputation: 3098
Yes, the grass sometimes is greener on the other side, despite what people who try to convince you otherwise tell you. Think of it as a realist, different people have different personas and like different things and qualities of a place. One person may move from the deep south to NYC and hate it and say "the grass sure isn't greener on the other side so just stay where you are" and tell everyone he/she knows. Someone else might move from the same place to NYC and love it and say the grass truly is greener on the other side. It depends what you like. You may love it and it could be the best decision you ever made, or you may realize where you are now really wasn't bad. Either way, it's a life experience, which is always beneficial.

MY ADVICE: DO IT! Move wherever you want. Live life and explore your options. Don't listen to people who say the grass is never greener on the other side. Sometimes it is. Just make sure you make the move when you are financially sound and have a job set up and/or plan on attending college in whatever city you're considering. Start planning and researching now, sometimes the year or two before you make the move is the most exciting time of all. Start researching some cities that interest you! Good luck.

EDIT: And I know exactly what you mean when you say people are either "hood or redneck". The town I grew up in was exactly like that for the most part, and I'm not even from the south (grew up in a small town outside of Pittsburgh).
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Old 05-17-2011, 08:18 AM
 
Location: The Southeast
97 posts, read 124,757 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
Yes, the grass sometimes is greener on the other side, despite what people who try to convince you otherwise tell you. Think of it as a realist, different people have different personas and like different things and qualities of a place. One person may move from the deep south to NYC and hate it and say "the grass sure isn't greener on the other side so just stay where you are" and tell everyone he/she knows. Someone else might move from the same place to NYC and love it and say the grass truly is greener on the other side. It depends what you like. You may love it and it could be the best decision you ever made, or you may realize where you are now really wasn't bad. Either way, it's a life experience, which is always beneficial.

MY ADVICE: DO IT! Move wherever you want. Live life and explore your options. Don't listen to people who say the grass is never greener on the other side. Sometimes it is. Just make sure you make the move when you are financially sound and have a job set up. Start planning and researching now, sometimes the year or two before you make the move is the most exciting time of all.

I am 18 right now and just finished my first year of college, plan is to transfer.

Also, I told you guys what I find wrong with the deep south.
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Old 05-17-2011, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh (via Chicago, via Pittsburgh)
3,887 posts, read 4,826,904 times
Reputation: 3098
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDude1 View Post
I am 18 right now and just finished my first year of college, plan is to transfer.

Also, I told you guys what I find wrong with the deep south.
That kind of makes it easier then, since you are already enrolled in a college and transferring usually isn't as tough as applying all over again for the first time. But my advice doesn't change. Just do it.
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Old 05-17-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,910 posts, read 19,750,579 times
Reputation: 12553
I definitely know what it is like to be in your shoes at that age. At age 18 I considered the West Coast more or less as a Utopia as a trip to Southern California right after high school ran my imagination wild. Then reality hit (bills, cost of living in SoCal, not familiar enough with the area or people out there). Basically a beautiful San Diego beach had painted the picture for me of a fantasyland. But eventually it evolved into inspiration, though I decided that SoCal wasn't for me and did more traveling until I found a more compatible city which eventually landed me in Seattle at the age of 22, after considering Denver first.

I ended up staying in Seattle for 5 years and it was one of the best experiences I've had, and definitely made my life richer and made me wiser and more open minded. Now I'm moving to New Mexico by the end of the year. In my 20's Seattle was a good fit for the trendy urban experience that I was seeking out at the time. Nowadays I'm leaning more towards living in a dryer and sunnier climate and getting away from the rat race of city, but also starting new traditions, and NM has plenty of room for that as it has a lot of character.

At 18, I'd have to tell you that patience is key. My moves in the past were in better economic conditions; in 2011 I'm making more solid and less spontaneous plans. My advice would be to research what you like, be confident in what you're looking for, find a city that is compatible, and definitely play it safe! Get to know some people where you think you'd like to move, try and network. Easier said than done would be, try not to bring your baggage with you to where you move. When you move, typically there is a one year honeymoon phase if you particulalrly like or love where you moved to. It took me about 2 years before I felt I had developed a close circle of friends. Reality does set in, but it works for some people, the grass is greener from their personal perspective in spite of what the cynics say.

Last edited by Champ le monstre du lac; 05-17-2011 at 08:45 AM..
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