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Old 09-22-2011, 03:50 PM
 
Location: District of Columbia
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From my understanding many post civil war confederates settled the American Southwest. That would be my guess as to why they sound southern. Of note, Central Florida historically has a large "Cowboy" population given its Spanish heritage. They are called "crackers", as in whip cracker.

Last edited by sandlapper; 09-22-2011 at 04:04 PM..
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Old 09-25-2011, 11:01 PM
 
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i recently saw a program over the labor day weekend, which spoke on the topic of the mason-dixon line, the south, linclon, and emancipation proclamation. the narrator was clearly defining the current identification of what part of the u.s. was identified as the south. according to him, it had noting to do w/ the transplants, which he seemed to realize was a hot topic these days. rather, he stated that the mason dixon line is a clearly defined northern, southern, western, and eastern border of the u.s. in fact, w/ the current definition as it has always been, pennsylvania is identified as a southern state, due to its admission to the union, as all of the mason-dixon states came in to the alliance on or before the designation of the recognized line.

to conclude, the south has always been clearly defined solely by geographical lat. and longt. lines, and never by customs, dialect, manners, transplantation or by other means, such as the displacement of ethnic groups, large areas of land, such as hispancis, mexicans, latinos, etc. ordinarily, i would assert that such things would remain that way, because of their current locations, and foundings; however, two or so years ago, i never would have thought americans would have trouble recognizing the difference in a male and a female, and the definition of marriage, which being the legally joining of one man and one woman by God before God the Almighty, eternally bound by solemn vow, not broken, until separated by death.

personally, i would have enjoyed hearing more on the assertion, which, no doubt, could have advanced to a very interesting and worthwhile argument and conversation on this perspective.
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Old 09-26-2011, 09:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by hucky27 View Post
I found this blog by accident and yes, it is interesting. I would say your post is very accurate. People from the South's accents are derived from Scotland and parts of England obviously. Some of the word choices and even the word yall is of Scottish roots just not of modern Scottish times. I would add that I think most states that historically were Southern in terms of first real pioneers like Arizona and Missouri have basically lost their identities because of all the folks from the big cities like Chicago moving there. If you look at all of the people who swear that these states are not Southern or were never places where Southerners migrated to, their American heritage probably does not go back very far back. It just amazes me how people can say that certain states like Missouri, Maryland, and yes even Arizona were never Southern. Maryland is full of people from New Jersey originally and I am sure if you ask most folks from Maryland they will say it is not a Southern state. Gosh, I am from North Florida, and many do not even feel my state is Southern.
When the Rebs here in CA (which was technically a Border State but banned slavery at the last minute as the "price" of entering the Union) realized they would be stuck "behind the lines" a small force of them actually assembled, pushed through to AZ and joined their brethren. When they were routed by Union Troops they fled to the East and many ended up in TX.
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Old 06-03-2018, 07:53 AM
 
Location: West Seattle
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Originally Posted by BeauCharles View Post
I went to school in tiny Mariposa County, California (Sierra Gold Country). There were kids who lived on foothill cattle ranches (and had for generations) who had a slight Western drawl. This was back in the late 70s, so their kids probably don't (seems like most kids sound the same coast to coast now). I remember thinking to myself - "This is California, why do they sound like they're from Texas?". I thought it was put-on.
One of my coworkers is from rural central California; he's in his 20s but he has that Western drawl going on pretty strong. I know another guy from around there, though, who sounds totally standard American (or, rather, he has the stereotypical "gay accent" - non-regional, though, at least).
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Old 06-06-2018, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,094 posts, read 807,666 times
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Originally Posted by LAX-PHX View Post
I knew what he meant and I was disputing it. From the very beginning AZ was settled by people from the Midwest and East. The people attracted to AZ were usually from places with harsh winters. The migration patterns to AZ aren't much different from California, Nevada or other western states. I'm nearly 40 and almost everybody I went to school with had relatives from the midwest or back east. Saying the northern migration to AZ is just recent is patently false. Even 4th or 5th generation Arizonans don't have southern or Texas like accents. It's the classic neutral midwest or whatever you want to call it. In all my time in the Phoenix area if you run into someone with a twang or drawl, which is rare you know immediately they are from somewhere else.
It's pretty interesting how the Southwest is so different from the Southeast despite both being in the Sunbelt. If it weren't for Southerners migrating to Texas, Texas would've been considered purely western as well. If the confederate would've moved further west, Socal would be totally different than it is today. People in LA make fun of the South's politics but yet geographically LA is about as far south as South Carolina, and people in the south call Californians yankee's but most Californa from a pure geographic standpoint is pretty southern, even the Bay Area is below the mason-dixon line.
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Old 01-12-2024, 01:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LAX-PHX View Post
I have to respectfully disagree Cacto. You've got to be kidding me if you think more people from the South migrated to AZ than Minnesota and the upper midwest. My gosh. Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan are all places where many people migrate to AZ from. It's far more common to hear a nasally Chicago accent than a southern one in Arizona. I have to wholeheartedly disagree with you about migration patterns in the west. As for the OP's question. I think Hollywood pegs Arizona and other western states in with Texas. It fits a stereotype that goes back to the old westerns. Ironically many Hollywood types probably don't realize that people in Phoenix, Denver, etc. talk just like they do.
Speaking historically--during the period when the "cowboy" became a significant occupation in the West--the whites migrating to those southwestern states were more often southerners, particularly after the Civil War.

I'd disagree, though that the "Western" accent is "Southern."
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Old 01-14-2024, 04:54 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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When I think about the West I think mostly about the difference in geography. We went to Denver, Colorado, in 1967 for my husband to study computers at his company's Western Division School and many people we met thought we were from Texas. Evidently the Texas accent is very much like the North Carolina Mountain accent because we do not identify with the way people in the plantation south sound. Many of these people were raised by black nannies and to me they have a mixture of white and black southern accents.

One expert on accents said with the people in the mountains being isolated because of the lack of roads and other ways of traveling some of them had pure Shakespearean accents.

While working in the library I experienced many people who came to North Carolina from Texas looking for ancestor records.
I have no opinion on this subject beyond saying many people like to put down our accents but if you knew our lineage you might want to change that opinion.
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Old 01-14-2024, 08:18 PM
 
28,664 posts, read 18,771,597 times
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Originally Posted by NCN View Post
When I think about the West I think mostly about the difference in geography. We went to Denver, Colorado, in 1967 for my husband to study computers at his company's Western Division School and many people we met thought we were from Texas. Evidently the Texas accent is very much like the North Carolina Mountain accent because we do not identify with the way people in the plantation south sound. Many of these people were raised by black nannies and to me they have a mixture of white and black southern accents.
The slaves picked up the accents of their owners. What you will hear is the same distinction of southern accents among blacks that you hear among whites. There is a distinct difference between those of the eastern south (think of the accents of Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter) and those of the deep south (think of George Wallace). The accents of black people originally from those areas reflects the same difference. There are some other differences, of course, in smaller populations, such as the Geechies and Gullahs, Cajuns, et cetera. There was also the injection of deep south accent into Atlanta and some larger urban areas during the migration of deep-south blacks to urban areas in the latter 20th century.
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Old 01-19-2024, 07:00 AM
 
73,002 posts, read 62,569,376 times
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Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
The slaves picked up the accents of their owners. What you will hear is the same distinction of southern accents among blacks that you hear among whites. There is a distinct difference between those of the eastern south (think of the accents of Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter) and those of the deep south (think of George Wallace). The accents of black people originally from those areas reflects the same difference. There are some other differences, of course, in smaller populations, such as the Geechies and Gullahs, Cajuns, et cetera. There was also the injection of deep south accent into Atlanta and some larger urban areas during the migration of deep-south blacks to urban areas in the latter 20th century.
That is one thing many people don't think about. What so many people think about as "sounding Black" or the "Black accent", it has deep roots in the southern USA. Black Americans didn't come up with that out of nowhere.

It makes it all the more ironic when comments like "you talk White" get thrown around.
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Old 01-19-2024, 10:10 AM
 
73,002 posts, read 62,569,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
When I think about the West I think mostly about the difference in geography. We went to Denver, Colorado, in 1967 for my husband to study computers at his company's Western Division School and many people we met thought we were from Texas. Evidently the Texas accent is very much like the North Carolina Mountain accent because we do not identify with the way people in the plantation south sound. Many of these people were raised by black nannies and to me they have a mixture of white and black southern accents.

One expert on accents said with the people in the mountains being isolated because of the lack of roads and other ways of traveling some of them had pure Shakespearean accents.

While working in the library I experienced many people who came to North Carolina from Texas looking for ancestor records.
I have no opinion on this subject beyond saying many people like to put down our accents but if you knew our lineage you might want to change that opinion.
Alot of people from Tennessee moved to Texas in its early years.
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